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Author: Subject: Do not keep illegal drugs for personal use in your house, if you do chemistry as a hobby
Fyndium
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 04:07


Issue with ordering third countries is they go through customs, while EU shipments are screened only in need or random basis.

Sometimes forensic analysis for chemicals mean they do a drug test on them and if they do not show up anything, they discard them or give them back depending on circumstances. I know a case where there was a dozen of seized items described as "white powder" or "yellow liquid" or "brown mass" with notation "test result: negative". They never knew what they were, and did not care. The guy even asked if they could analyze what one powder was because he forgot what it was due to labels missing, but they told him to f* off.

I also'd be interested to hear what sentence you got, karlos³. I would presume that even in the less harsh parts of europe, minor amounts of upper class drugs with notable amounts of precursors would get more than fines.
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karlos³
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 07:30


Yeah I remember the case with Lippert Lehrmittel too, and later they've ruined Technikhandel Wendt's existence as well.

I got 3 years on probation for slightly less than what the law considers a large amount of amphetamine freebase.
The money fines hurt though, I had to pay the court session and the work of the forensics.
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Antigua
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 07:36


Quote: Originally posted by karlos³  
Yeah I remember the case with Lippert Lehrmittel too, and later they've ruined Technikhandel Wendt's existence as well.

I got 3 years on probation for slightly less than what the law considers a large amount of amphetamine freebase.
The money fines hurt though, I had to pay the court session and the work of the forensics.


The one thing I'd best most scared of would be that it's all left one one's CV for the rest of life. Not even the fines or probation, maybe not even a couple of months in jail - being stigmatized by employers not for killing someone, hurting or destroying one's life, but for making yourself some drug that makes you go *bhhawaahh*. Shaking my head, it's annoying. Glad you're with us, carl :)
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 08:36


Antigua, why would you put a sentence on your CV? Is that a thing?

I don't know how it works in other countries, but here the only thing an employer can ask for is a VOG, a declaration you are fit for a certain profession.
The declaration is given out by the government and whether or not you get it depends on the profession you are applying for.

So you won't get a VOG for driving a taxi if you got caught for drunk driving but you wouldn't have a problem becoming a teacher. When you were convicted for a drug related offense you can't work with minors for five years but driving a taxi wouldn't be problem.
Child abuse would obviously permanently exclude you from working with minors for example.
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Antigua
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 08:45


I'm aware, what I meant is that many problems emerge (especially with education institutes like colleges or universities). Where I live, some HRs check university workers for being sentenced. I might've exaggerated a bit - I'd just personally suffer a lot from stress in a moment when anyone could percieve me as a criminal.

edit: Also what's this under Tsjerks post? :o

[Edited on 29-11-2020 by Antigua]

123.PNG - 4kB
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karlos³
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 08:57


You're really showing your age, thats the AOL instant messenger :D
A thing of the past now.
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Texium (zts16)
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 09:36


In the US, pretty much any job application will require the applicant to state if they have ever been convicted of a felony. You’re legally obligated to tell the truth, and it’s just a check box, binary choice, with no room to elaborate that it was only a personal drug offense and you didn’t commit armed robbery or kill anyone. For many applicants, having to check that box is a death sentence for most jobs. You’ll already be weeded out before they bother running a background check on you.



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Tsjerk
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 11:00


Quote: Originally posted by Texium (zts16)  
In the US, pretty much any job application will require the applicant to state if they have ever been convicted of a felony.


That sucks! Quite unfair. Sounds counter productive as well, when someone is convicted, they can't get a job and go back into criminality...

Quote: Originally posted by Antigua  

edit: Also what's this under Tsjerks post? :o

[Edited on 29-11-2020 by Antigua]


Ah! So that is what Aim in the profile section is for... I filled out something there long ago to see what it is for. Now I know.

[Edited on 29-11-2020 by Tsjerk]
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karlos³
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 11:01


I applied for two jobs after that.
I told them of that in both job interviews, in the one, they didn't took me because of that, and the other in turn took me because of that.
They actually found that interesting.
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 11:05


Wow, that is unusual. I wonder whether it's anything chemistry related :o
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Texium (zts16)
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 12:05


Quote: Originally posted by Tsjerk  
Quote: Originally posted by Texium (zts16)  
In the US, pretty much any job application will require the applicant to state if they have ever been convicted of a felony.


That sucks! Quite unfair. Sounds counter productive as well, when someone is convicted, they can't get a job and go back into criminality...
Yes, unfortunately that is a commonly seen pattern here. Many small businesses are more conscientious and forgiving of past indiscretions, so it’s certainly possible to catch a lucky break, but larger companies will often discard any applications from felons unless they are for minimum wage jobs that nobody wants to do.



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macckone
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 12:26


It goes without saying don't do anything illegal and you have less issues.
Fortunately here they have made marijuana legal.
Possession of small quantities has been a misdemeanor in most of the US for decades but there are places with backwards policies like alabama.
That being said, if you get investigated because of a chemical purchase, you may beat the charge but not the ride.
Ie. you still have to go to jail and get bailed out, you still have to hire a lawyer, you still have to go to court, and if you live in a smaller community the whole town will know your charges even if they are expunged. And it will be expensive and you aren't getting a dime of that money back.
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 12:46


Quote: Originally posted by Antigua  
Wow, that is unusual. I wonder whether it's anything chemistry related :o

No, not that much.
It depends on how you've done it.
A friend of mine, sadly deceased now(google Olaf Lichtenberger) actually got a high paying job because of his lab being busted.
His supervisor actually was the great-grandson of one of the inventors of MDMA.
So it really depends.
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[*] posted on 29-11-2020 at 12:50


Quote: Originally posted by karlos³  
Quote: Originally posted by Antigua  
Wow, that is unusual. I wonder whether it's anything chemistry related :o

No, not that much.
It depends on how you've done it.
A friend of mine, sadly deceased now(google Olaf Lichtenberger) actually got a high paying job because of his lab being busted.
His supervisor actually was the great-grandson of one of the inventors of MDMA.
So it really depends.


Wow, Merck... I wish I could work there in the future. Always admired their ability of milking money out of gov and actually being helpful in some sciences.
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