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Author: Subject: Anyone know what dyes can be used for anodizing or what they are made of?
RogueRose
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[*] posted on 27-10-2020 at 11:57
Anyone know what dyes can be used for anodizing or what they are made of?


I need to anodize a number of parts and would like to have the option of a few colors, but at $25-30 for 2oz-4oz, it's getting rather expensive if doing a number of colors. I'm wondering if anyone anodizes aluminum and know of a good dye - or possibly if there is some compound that works or can be made fairly easily.

I'd really like to be able to do a lot of colors if possible but that is currently price prohibitive for the amount of parts I'll be doing.
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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 27-10-2020 at 12:36


IIRC some textile dyes (Rit?) can be used, google should find this for you.



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valeg96
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[*] posted on 27-10-2020 at 13:29


There's a video, in Italian, of a guy with a lot of workshop tutorials. In his aluminium anodization video he uses inkjet printer liquid dyes. He keeps note of the brand and the proportions to make them reproducible, and claims they work very well.

Blue inkjet dyes should be phthalocyanine based, so pretty harmelss but persistent as hell.





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macckone
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[*] posted on 27-10-2020 at 13:34


Anodizing leaves a rough surface that makes dying easy.
It also forms a tougher protective layer on the aluminum.
Any colorfast dye will probably work.
Rit is easy to get in the USA.
Many paints can also be used with a dip and rinse technique.
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bobm4360
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[*] posted on 27-10-2020 at 21:20


Most of the DIY anodizers in the home machining/model engine building community use RIT.
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RogueRose
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[*] posted on 29-10-2020 at 15:35


Quote: Originally posted by Fulmen  
IIRC some textile dyes (Rit?) can be used, google should find this for you.


Yeah that is what is noted on A LOT of internet sites - but if you look at the reviews of the results after a few months to a year - the dye supposedly fades A LOT - especially when exposed to UV light. Now IDK if this is due to people using too weak a concentration, or if it is inherent in the dye that is use. I had been planning on using this until I read some machining forums and there were LOTS of posts warning people to avoid this for long term use.
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RogueRose
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[*] posted on 29-10-2020 at 15:39


Quote: Originally posted by macckone  
Anodizing leaves a rough surface that makes dying easy.
It also forms a tougher protective layer on the aluminum.
Any colorfast dye will probably work.
Rit is easy to get in the USA.
Many paints can also be used with a dip and rinse technique.


As I said in the above post - many - if not most How To's - suggest RIT - but in many of the Knife, gun, computer parts, electronics, car part forums they say it just doens't last as it fades relatively quickly as compared to "professional" dies. But I also read that Caswell dyes (meant for anodizing) doesn't work as well as RIT - so I'm just kind of lost here as to what the truth is.
It seems like one of those Internet things where you get both sides of the story and you come away not really knowing anything more than when you started researching it..

[Edited on 10-29-2020 by RogueRose]
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rockyit98
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[*] posted on 30-10-2020 at 01:26


after e Phosphoric acid a light rinse and dunk it in to a FeCl3 Bath. some people have tried black coffee IDK.



acid that repeat its qualities called "Periodic acid".
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macckone
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[*] posted on 30-10-2020 at 07:39


RogueRose,
There are three factors in the fastness of anodizing dyes.
One is wear
Two is dye fading
Three is dye fastness

One is dependent on the anodizing as well as the dye thickness
Two is mostly a UV light issue, metallic dyes are going to be more permanent than organic.
Three has so many factors that it would require a whole book.
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