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Author: Subject: Thermite Heat Whille Mixing
Chemgineer
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[*] posted on 14-7-2021 at 08:44
Thermite Heat Whille Mixing


I recently produced some brown iron oxide using some scrap steel and a car battery charger. I dried it out and it broke into a nice fine powder.

I figured I would give it a test with some 325 mesh aluminium power in a 7:3 ratio iron oxide:aluminium.

Knowing it requires allot of activation energy to get thermite going I wasn't too cautious mixing the reactants together but was quite surprised when I started to feel heat being produced by my mixture!

Is it possible I had some i iron not yet oxidised and this was producing heat as it did so?
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MineMan
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[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 02:32


Like a hot pack. I wouldn’t worry about it. As long as it’s iron oxide your good.
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Brightthermite
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[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 09:30


Ive never had it happen but I use store bought oxide. Like MineMan said its like a handwarmer and not near enough heat to ignite the mix
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katyushaslab
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[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 11:57


Water in your oxide reacting with the aluminium powder is a possibility, this will generate some heat.

Ensure your stuff is dry.
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Gargamel
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[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 12:15



Quote:

Water in your oxide reacting with the aluminium powder is a possibility, this will generate some heat.

The only option that makes sense to me.

Especially when your aluminium is homemade and fresh, without or with very little oxide layer.


Quote:

Is it possible I had some i iron not yet oxidised and this was producing heat as it did so?


When it's still wet, yes.

Maybe you mixed it so hard it got warm from your mixing workout:P
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Chemgineer
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[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 12:21


Quote: Originally posted by Gargamel  

Quote:


When it's still wet, yes.



It had been baked in an oven for a couple of hours at 200 deg C but I think you are right, next time I might hit it with a gas torch to dry it fully.

[Edited on 15-7-2021 by Chemgineer]
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MineMan
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[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 02:23


Quote: Originally posted by Chemgineer  
Quote: Originally posted by Gargamel  

Quote:


When it's still wet, yes.



It had been baked in an oven for a couple of hours at 200 deg C but I think you are right, next time I might hit it with a gas torch to dry it fully.

I find it hard to believe 325 mesh Al would make heat when mixed with water. But the important thing is, your good in da hood. Make that thermite. Watch the magnificent sparks. Throw a few buckets in your back and get a job welding skyscrapers, and claim to be the best damn welder on the planet. Then, buy the worlds oldest cornbread recipe at auction, open up a cornbread business. You that sweet doughy cash to open a non profit helping young women in the twenties become models. Date one of those models. See where this got you? I do… thermite got you here!
[Edited on 15-7-2021 by Chemgineer]
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katyushaslab
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[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 05:07


Depending on the freshness of your Aluminium, it can start generating heat when mixed with water. Especially if its oxide layer is being abraded off by being mixed with something abrasive... Like a metal oxide, for example.
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Microtek
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[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 23:46


Another possibility if you were using a wet electrolytic process for the iron oxide, is that you inadvedently produced a little hydroxide as well.
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