Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Formation of red Samarium (II) Chloride
ChemTalk
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 64
Registered: 13-12-2018
Location: United States
Member Is Offline

Mood: colloidal

[*] posted on 15-7-2021 at 14:39
Formation of red Samarium (II) Chloride


We made a short 60-second video showing the formation of the rarely seen red samarium (II) chloride, along with some close-ups of elemental samarium taken with our new macro lens.

We hope you enjoy, let us know how you like it, and if there are any other rare-earth element reactions or elements you would be interested in seeing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjBWzd04Qzo

Scott

PS -we heard that samarium (II) sulfate may be even more stable, but we have not been able to produce it yet.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Bedlasky
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 878
Registered: 15-4-2019
Location: Beleriand
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 01:18


Nice video! If you have THF and iodine, you can make stable solution of SmI2, which is red. You can also make green solution of YbI2 in the same way. Here are some materials:

https://books.google.cz/books?id=QUfQamGsEgwC&printsec=f...

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/ja00528a029

Ce(IV) form red complex [CeCl6]2- in conc. HCl (and also chlorine and Ce3+). Heating cause full decomposition to Ce3+ and Cl2.

I read something about Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) complexes with periodate, tellurate and phosphotungstate, which may be interesting and very strong oxidants.





If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

I can offer GC analysis of samples. Just U2U to me for more info.

"An old friend once told me something that gave me great comfort. Something he had read. He said that Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin never died. They simply became music." Dr. Robert Ford, Westworld
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
ChemTalk
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 64
Registered: 13-12-2018
Location: United States
Member Is Offline

Mood: colloidal

[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 07:54


Bedlasky, thanks for the nice comment, and for the suggestions. We'll try to get some THF. I wonder if it would work in Xylene?

I have several rare earth elements, I have to check to see if I have Ytterbium, I might. we have Cerium (IV). Thanks for the links.

Quote: Originally posted by Bedlasky  
Nice video! If you have THF and iodine, you can make stable solution of SmI2, which is red. You can also make green solution of YbI2 in the same way. Here are some materials:

https://books.google.cz/books?id=QUfQamGsEgwC&printsec=f...

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/ja00528a029

Ce(IV) form red complex [CeCl6]2- in conc. HCl (and also chlorine and Ce3+). Heating cause full decomposition to Ce3+ and Cl2.

I read something about Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) complexes with periodate, tellurate and phosphotungstate, which may be interesting and very strong oxidants.

View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
vano
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 502
Registered: 22-3-2019
Location: Georgia, Kutaisi
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 08:32


It isn't possible for xylene. Look at the photo, in solution samarium iodide is connected with five molecules of THF.

330px-Diiodopenta(THF)samarium(II)-3D-balls.png - 35kB




A narrow road cannot keep back Death, nor a rocky one; by him all are levelled, weak and strong-hearted; in the end the earth unites in one place youth and greybeard. Better a glorious death than shameful life!
—The Knight in the Panther's Skin
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Bedlasky
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 878
Registered: 15-4-2019
Location: Beleriand
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 11:40


ChemTalk: Other solvents are possible according that book. There are examples of other solvents: HMPA, acetonitrile, isopropyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol, heptan-2-ol and DME (but I honestly don't know what they mean by DME, there are several compounds with this abbreviation). It is important that solvent can coordinate to Sm(II).

[Edited on 16-7-2021 by Bedlasky]

[Edited on 16-7-2021 by Bedlasky]




If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

I can offer GC analysis of samples. Just U2U to me for more info.

"An old friend once told me something that gave me great comfort. Something he had read. He said that Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin never died. They simply became music." Dr. Robert Ford, Westworld
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
ChemTalk
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 64
Registered: 13-12-2018
Location: United States
Member Is Offline

Mood: colloidal

[*] posted on 16-7-2021 at 13:01


Bedlasky,

Thanks. It is easy to get THF here, they actually sell it on Amazon.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
nezza
National Hazard
****




Posts: 318
Registered: 17-4-2011
Location: UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: phosphorescent

[*] posted on 29-7-2021 at 10:26


Here's my video of Samarium dissolving in dilute hydrochloric acid.

Attachment: Samarium-1.mp4 (3.8MB)
This file has been downloaded 59 times





If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
ChemTalk
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 64
Registered: 13-12-2018
Location: United States
Member Is Offline

Mood: colloidal

[*] posted on 29-7-2021 at 20:46


thanks Nezza, this is a great video. I think you posted this some time ago? I feel like I've seen it before

You got much more samarium (II) chloride, yours was much more red. I'm not sure why, maybe your hydrochloric acid was more dilute? Or your samarium piece was larger than mine?
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User

  Go To Top