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Author: Subject: Glassware cleaning routine
CycloRook
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[*] posted on 15-3-2022 at 04:43


I have a question. Can you use a dishwasher to clean glassware ?

I noticed that dish detergent is a great cleaner in general.

If I ran glassware through my dishwasher then took it out and ran the dishwasher empty several time to clean it would that present a health hazard ?

I think in general this is a bad idea
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Tsjerk
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[*] posted on 15-3-2022 at 07:40


Depends on what you use the glassware for. Mercury? Probably better not. Kitchen salt? Shouldn't be a problem.
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Rainwater
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[*] posted on 15-3-2022 at 08:03


If in dought, incineration will decompose most waste products, no heavy metals please. But most organics are substantially reduced.
I have a pressureized container bleeding into the air inlet of my forge burner.
12cfm air
6psi propane
150ml of byproducts from making dixoane
Can process about 2 liter per minute. Depending on how energetic the combustion is and now much water is present.

This was . Very flammable.
https://youtu.be/RqdhXs26fE8




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Fyndium
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[*] posted on 15-3-2022 at 08:08


This is a topic that has interested me for some time.

Are there any studies how much soluble OR insoluble mercury is left in a glass beaker after it has been thoroughly washed and cleaned and rinsed?

I would presume the amounts are extremely small, but detectable with sufficient equipment even after ordinary washing procedure, because glass is non-porous surface. Acid washing would likely be pretty exclusive.

I'm not paving a slope for using mercury laced pyrex for cooking after you've finished cooking, just out of interest. :)
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ManyInterests
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[*] posted on 1-7-2022 at 16:24


Quote:
This is a topic that has interested me for some time.

Are there any studies how much soluble OR insoluble mercury is left in a glass beaker after it has been thoroughly washed and cleaned and rinsed?

I would presume the amounts are extremely small, but detectable with sufficient equipment even after ordinary washing procedure, because glass is non-porous surface. Acid washing would likely be pretty exclusive.

I'm not paving a slope for using mercury laced pyrex for cooking after you've finished cooking, just out of interest.


One way of doing that is to never use the same things you use for chemistry for cooking. I have two glass baking dishes and I only use them for chemistry.
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Mateo_swe
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[*] posted on 15-7-2022 at 13:28


Never use chemistry glassware for cooking or something you eat or drink and never use cooking tings for chemistry unless they stay chemistry only after.
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