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Author: Subject: Where to look for solubility data?
zerodan
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[*] posted on 14-12-2021 at 13:23
Where to look for solubility data?


I just spent 15 minutes looking for solubility data for the third time this month and it's been such a pain it motivated me to write this post.

I feel like every time I try to compare solubility of 2 compounds there is either only one temperature point (25C) in one, or things like acetone/methanol/glycerol are listed in only one of them, or they also have a single temperature point, or just says "slightly soluble" whatever that means.
The list could go on and on :mad:

As an example look at NaCl and NaClO acetone solubility,
NaCl has no mention of it in the usual place but some wierd table down at the bottom has it,
NaClO says "Sparingly soluble" but at least it's where it's supposed to be.

Usually I use wikipedia/smwiki or look through google images,
I also tried pubchem but it's even worse as it's in the form of citations that seem to be automatically generated as they are sometimes wrong/not related to question they should answer.
What do you guys use? Is there some secret website I don't know about where everything is in one place or do you also go through this journey each time you want to look things up?
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DraconicAcid
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[*] posted on 14-12-2021 at 13:26


I generally use chemister.ru for solubility data, although it's not perfect by any means.

http://chemister.ru/Database/properties-en.php?dbid=1&id...
http://chemister.ru/Database/properties-en.php?dbid=1&id...




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zerodan
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[*] posted on 14-12-2021 at 13:43


Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
I generally use chemister.ru for solubility data, although it's not perfect by any means.

http://chemister.ru/Database/properties-en.php?dbid=1&id...
http://chemister.ru/Database/properties-en.php?dbid=1&id...


Thank you, very neat website, this one had 2 sample points for nacl/acetone :).
Although as you said, it's not perfect, naclo/acetone is "sparingly soluble" at 1 sample point, also a little hard to navigate.
Biggest let down is http because if your isp sees random chem queries that might get you a knock on the door, and trust me they will see it, 99% of traffic is over https so it will stick out like a sore thumb with webpage title and all, and that .ru tld :P.
I probably wouldn't use it just because of that.

Oh nvm you can connect with https

[Edited on 14-12-2021 by zerodan]
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walruslover69
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[*] posted on 14-12-2021 at 20:11


I admit that I have run into the same problem trying to look up what are relatively common compounds, so the values must all be there somewhere in the literature. It surprises me that a better database doesn't exist. someone somewhere, some company has to have that data compiled already right?
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[*] posted on 14-12-2021 at 21:11


There's this:
https://srdata.nist.gov/solubility/sol_main_search.aspx (digital IUPAC-NIST database)
https://iupac.org/what-we-do/databases/solubility-data-serie... (scans of hard copy publications)



I don't think most sites go to the pains of publishing all of the data as its usually not really necessary for most syntheses. For anything you can't find, you can always conduct your own research and create your own tables.
It could be a useful project, set a standard, say 5 or 10mL of H2O, acetone, ethanol, and whatever else is of interest, and then add x amount in increments of mg or g until saturation. Then you can just convert it into grams/liter or grams/mL.


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[*] posted on 15-12-2021 at 02:42


I used book. I don't know how to correctly translate the name of that book, I couldn't find it. In my country we call that kind of book "tables" like mathematical-physical-chemical tables or chemical-analytical tables etc. I mostly used chemical-analytical tables, there is a first (chemical) part where is list of many compounds with their properties (molar mass, density, refractive index, solubility, enthalphy of formation/combustion etc.). Some properties like density, solubility, refractive index etc. are listed at several different temperatures. The second part of book is analytical, there are chapters about redox/precipitation/complex equilibriums, thermodynamic, optic etc.



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zerodan
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[*] posted on 15-12-2021 at 05:53


Quote: Originally posted by tetrogen  

It could be a useful project, set a standard, say 5 or 10mL of H2O, acetone, ethanol, and whatever else is of interest, and then add x amount in increments of mg or g until saturation. Then you can just convert it into grams/liter or grams/mL.

I considered doing this but realized I don't have the means to do it.
As in no lab, no temperature controlled heater/cooler, no time, no/few acs reagents so any results would be of little value.
My example of NaCl/NaClO3 stems from the fact that I wanted to separate the product from my cell, assuming it's even present I cannot vouch for it's purity and testing anything other than a pure reagent is pointless.

Quote:

It surprises me that a better database doesn't exist. someone somewhere, some company has to have that data compiled already right?


I think I'm gonna make myself one for the sake of convenience


Quote:

There's this:
https://srdata.nist.gov/solubility/sol_main_search.aspx (digital IUPAC-NIST database)
https://iupac.org/what-we-do/databases/solubility-data-serie... (scans of hard copy publications)


This seems to be the source material most sites reference.
Although it's anything but pleasant to use, selecting solubility system from drop down menu with thousands of entries lol? Searching by text for NH4Cl givers me "Ammonium dihydrogenphosphate with Ammonium chloride and Water" :o
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[*] posted on 15-12-2021 at 10:15
solubility


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
This is the basic source I sometimes go to for solubility data.

Before that it was the trusty CRC manual. I had a gripe about
the CRC. I bought the 81st edition(2000) on eBay. They had
limited the solubility specifications to 35C. That's useless to
me. The well worn pages of the 52nd edition(1971), which I
paid $15 for in a used book store has the solubility ranges,
in 100 ml water at 0C and 100C unless otherwise specified.
Best $15 I ever spent on a manual.





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[*] posted on 15-12-2021 at 10:29


Quote: Originally posted by zerodan  
Quote: Originally posted by tetrogen  

It could be a useful project, set a standard, say 5 or 10mL of H2O, acetone, ethanol, and whatever else is of interest, and then add x amount in increments of mg or g until saturation. Then you can just convert it into grams/liter or grams/mL.

I considered doing this but realized I don't have the means to do it.
As in no lab, no temperature controlled heater/cooler, no time, no/few acs reagents so any results would be of little value.
My example of NaCl/NaClO3 stems from the fact that I wanted to separate the product from my cell, assuming it's even present I cannot vouch for it's purity and testing anything other than a pure reagent is pointless.

Quote:

It surprises me that a better database doesn't exist. someone somewhere, some company has to have that data compiled already right?


I think I'm gonna make myself one for the sake of convenience


Quote:

There's this:
https://srdata.nist.gov/solubility/sol_main_search.aspx (digital IUPAC-NIST database)
https://iupac.org/what-we-do/databases/solubility-data-serie... (scans of hard copy publications)


This seems to be the source material most sites reference.
Although it's anything but pleasant to use, selecting solubility system from drop down menu with thousands of entries lol? Searching by text for NH4Cl givers me "Ammonium dihydrogenphosphate with Ammonium chloride and Water" :o


Yeah, its not the best by any means. I definitely suggest using pubchem to find the CAS ID of the compound prior to searching on the IUPAC database. Much more reliable. Still not sure if it will be of much help though since most involve multiple compounds and/or solvents.

I hear you on the project idea. You could start out with just room temp values, and whatever reagents you have, just note their speculated purity. Even if not of much help to others, it could be helpful to you since you are using those reagents, and any variations would of course be applicable to your experiments. Of course finding actual data would be the best and easiest way to go
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Linus1208
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[*] posted on 17-12-2021 at 04:56


I found this german website pretty useful when looking for solubilities of anorganic compounds in water.

https://www.internetchemie.info/chemie-lexikon/daten/l/loesl...
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[*] posted on 17-12-2021 at 22:16


Quote: Originally posted by zerodan  

What do you guys use? Is there some secret website I don't know about where everything is in one place or do you also go through this journey each time you want to look things up?


To obtain the solubility of different compounds at different temperatures, solvents, mixed systems, etc.
I always refer to

"Solubility Of Inorganic And Organic Compounds - A Compilation Of Quantitative Solubility Data From Periodical Literature By Atherton Seidell —
Second Edition, Enlarged And Thoroughly Revised, 1919"


It's almost a thousand pages filled with solubility data for various compounds arranged alphabetically, from simple salts to compounds whose names only the damn organic chemists could pronounce. It has tables with the solubility of 0 to 100 degrees Celsius, in pure water, various solvents, solvent mixtures, correction for anhydrous and hydrated salts, etc. Yes, it is a book from 100 years ago, but at that time they already had adequate instruments and standards to take fine measurements like these. If you compare the values ​​presented in the book with the values ​​in any modern database, you will see that they are identical or only slightly different. I will attach he download link for this book on the Internet Archive.

The copyright of the book has expired and therefore it is a work of free disclosure. I hope it's useful to you
.
https://archive.org/details/2ndsolubilitieso00seiduoft/page/...



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Sulaiman
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[*] posted on 17-12-2021 at 23:15


excellent book ... thank you



considering the time and manpower required to create such tables
I expect all of the best references to be expensive, or corporate IP.




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[*] posted on 5-4-2022 at 11:59
Book


Just ran across this thread today. Always looking for useful reference books.
Great find even if it is 103 years old. BTW, 1919 was the 1st year for CRC.




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[*] posted on 6-4-2022 at 01:27


Quote: Originally posted by Johnny Cappone  


To obtain the solubility of different compounds at different temperatures, solvents, mixed systems, etc.
I always refer to

"Solubility Of Inorganic And Organic Compounds - A Compilation Of Quantitative Solubility Data From Periodical Literature By Atherton Seidell —
Second Edition, Enlarged And Thoroughly Revised, 1919"



Thank you




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yobbo II
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[*] posted on 6-4-2022 at 12:03




Solubility data series

https://iupac.org/what-we-do/databases/solubility-data-serie...


I think it has been posted above

If you are looking for the solubility of two solids in a liqued, look up 'The system xxxx yyyyy zzzzz'

The ternary system sodium chloride potassium chloride acetone
on Google Scholar

https://scholar.google.com/

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C5&am...

Yob
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[*] posted on 19-4-2022 at 12:19


I came across this solubility table some time ago. I can't vouch for it's absolute accuracy, but I have used it as a guide a few times and it seems about right.

Attachment: Solubility table.xls (120kB)
This file has been downloaded 38 times





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