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Author: Subject: Best Place to learn Chemistry Online (Beginner to Expert) ?
LuckyWinner
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[*] posted on 31-1-2022 at 09:46
Best Place to learn Chemistry Online (Beginner to Expert) ?


what website has *the best* from beginner to expert interactive and properly structured chemistry course?

this can be a payed service or free.
I assume payed services provide the best overall package
and get you the most condensed time/learning effectiveness

there are some amazing free youtube channels like
prof dave explains or
leah4sci

(other threads about this topic are already outdated and
several months old)

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B(a)P
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[*] posted on 31-1-2022 at 11:53


Michel van Biezel
This is another youtube channel that is worth a look.
MIT Open is also worth a look
MIT Chemistry

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LuckyWinner
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[*] posted on 31-1-2022 at 17:34


are there any payed online courses that give you animations,tasks, good structure, ...
maybe 'brilliant. did anyone try that, is it any good?'

the complete package, not just videos.

[Edited on 1-2-2022 by LuckyWinner]
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Texium
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[*] posted on 1-2-2022 at 12:34


If you're willing to do paid online courses, you might as well see what your local community college has to offer. Many times they'll offer courses online at fairly affordable fees. Especially now with covid, most classes besides the labs are online. And as an added bonus, you can get yourself an associate's degree if you pass enough of them.



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Rainwater
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[*] posted on 1-2-2022 at 12:56


Nothing beats snuggling up with a good textbook. Openstax has a free one. It comes with lesson problems, chapter reviews, and section tests



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Texium
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[*] posted on 1-2-2022 at 13:26


Quote: Originally posted by Rainwater  
Nothing beats snuggling up with a good textbook. Openstax has a free one. It comes with lesson problems, chapter reviews, and section tests
A textbook is good if you have the discipline to follow through with reading all the material and working all the problems, even the less interesting parts. I struggle with that somewhat myself, so I found that I learned quite a bit through formal education, even though I'd already been reading some college level books by the time I started. I likely wouldn't have learned a lot of what I know now if I had to learn it by making myself read books. Another part of that is that a good teacher should be able to provide something that a textbook alone is not able to, in the form of answering questions that aren't addressed by the book, and leading class discussions.

Point is, textbooks are great, but they aren't a perfect substitute for a class, especially if you're like me and don't have the self-discipline to teach yourself about molecular orbital theory and the other more intangible subjects that are rather dense and difficult to wrap one's head around.




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Rainwater
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[*] posted on 1-2-2022 at 13:44


Quote: Originally posted by Texium  
Another part of that is that a good teacher should be able to provide something that a textbook alone is not able to, in the form of answering questions that aren't addressed by the book, and leading class discussions.

100% behind you on that. A good teacher will make the difference between passing a class and loving a subject

Another good resource is online tutoring videos.

https://www.mathtutordvd.com/ is the first one i purchased. He does a great job solving common problems.

Organic chemistry tutor has a lot of free lessons on youtube
https://youtube.com/c/TheOrganicChemistryTutor





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MidLifeChemist
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[*] posted on 6-2-2022 at 00:25


ChemTalk has simple explanations for a wide range of topics: https://chemistrytalk.org/

For paid options, Dr. Scott has a good assortment of videos and live classes: https://learnwithdrscott.com/

You can find decent 4 or 8 week chemistry classes on outschool, and also sometimes private lessons for a reasonable price: https://outschool.com/

you can purchase a used copy of "chemistry - the central science" online for not too much, and it is a great book.

>> what website has *the best* from beginner to expert interactive and properly structured chemistry course?
I haven't found a good properly structured course online yet. Let us know what your research comes up with!


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[*] posted on 6-2-2022 at 14:27


I agree with Tex, Text Books are a great resource, but you really do need to have the discipline, I have struggled with that in my self teaching too. In school it is no problem, I am there, learning the topic, but on my own I get distracted, sometimes, wanting to do a little more research on a topic mentioned in a paragraph and forget about it.

I like to combine different resources and if I can also find a video of the reaction to actually see it. I did that often in school too, I would read the chapter in the text book, fill out my log book, maybe read a bit more about the reaction, if there was a video, watch it. I found that combining them all helped a lot.

If you are a visual learner some good YouTube channels are "Professor Dave Explains", "Leah 4 Sci", "The Organic Chemistry Tutor". There are others, but there 3 I like and if searching for something I will look for one or all 3 of their videos.
What I like about these creators is they really go into good explanation of specific topic. There is one issue I have however with The Organic Chemistry Tutor, he needs to draw his structures a little more neat, I mean a benzene ring doesn't need to be a perfect hexagon, but it should not be leaning too far either.

Edit:

I forgot my second point, I also agree that a good teach makes a world of difference.

Org I we had an awesome teacher who was a PhD, he had as thick accent but made up for it in his teaching skills.

Org II we had a crappy teacher, I had to correct her several times, students had a hard time learning from her.

[Edited on 6-2-2022 by Syn the Sizer]
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[*] posted on 3-3-2022 at 00:18


Hello,
Here is a list of websites where you can learn chemistry online
Udemy
On Udemy, you may find a variety of chemistry classes to help you learn more about the fundamentals of the topic. Their numerous courses include topics for persons who have studied little to no chemistry as well as those who want to become experts in the field. Their introductory chemistry lectures cover a variety of subjects, including what different ways you may use to make different combinations and how these mixtures are generated on a molecular level.
Coursera
Coursera has a large number of chemistry courses that you may take whenever you want. They feature a solid selection of classes that cover a wide range of topics, allowing you to master all of the fundamental principles you'll need to get started in the discipline of chemistry. Their courses for beginners, intermediates, and expert chemists are all well-explained and simple to follow, and they were created by some of the world's most prestigious institutions.
Preply
Preply is another website that has qualified teachers who can teach you all you need to know about chemical fundamentals. All of the teachers on the site have a lot of expertise and have studied chemistry for a long time, so they're more than qualified to assist you learn the basics or anything more complex.
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[*] posted on 3-3-2022 at 00:35


Quote: Originally posted by LuckyWinner  
are there any payed online courses that give you animations,tasks, good structure, ...
maybe 'brilliant. did anyone try that, is it any good?'

the complete package, not just videos.

[Edited on 1-2-2022 by LuckyWinner]


What did you end up going with @LuckyWinner?
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Tsjerk
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[*] posted on 3-3-2022 at 01:55


I use Udemy for IT courses, those are numerous and vary from beginner to expert. Never pay the $100+ prices though, just wait for them to become the $10 - $14, they always do.
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