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Author: Subject: Working surface for Labconco fume hood
SuperOxide
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[*] posted on 1-5-2022 at 11:46
Working surface for Labconco fume hood


I just got a new fume hood which I made a separate thread about. The fume hood came with basically just the top piece, not the bottom solvent storage unit or the working surface.
I can put this on pretty much anything, it doesn't need to be a Labconco solvent storage unit. However, the working surface is something I would like to get right.

The fume hood is their 4 ft unit, and I'm 95% sure that the working surface that usually comes with it is this one which costs $1,266 new, I couldn't find any used ones anywhere or 3rd party replacements.

Here's what they look like:


Now I found some nice material I could use as the working surface (either phenolic resin or even just HDPE sheets), but I wanted to see about getting the holes drilled in the right areas and ideally even the "spillstoper" part that's slightly inset to prevent liquids from spilling out the front (under the air foil) or on the sides (getting under the fume hood base).

Question: Does anyone have one of these that could maybe give me the exact dimensions that I could use as a template? Or maybe know where I could go to get those schematics? I might send Labconco an email asking for them, but I can't imagine they would be eager to help someone who wants to make a DIY replacement for their $1,266 piece of equipment, and it's not on their product data sheet either.

Thanks!

[Edited on 1-5-2022 by SuperOxide]
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crow6283
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[*] posted on 2-5-2022 at 14:52


I know this isn’t what you’re asking for… but it’s a lot easier just to build your own to whatever specs you want once you have the hood in front of you. Want to store a pump underneath? No problem. A cup sink? A cup sink is very convenient. I’ve been fortunate enough to buy a couple of hoods of similar size from surplus sales very cheap - one for around 50 USD in fact.

It’s also convenient just to look for old chemical resistant countertops you can put it on. I managed to find one with a sink already in it!

I would email Labconco anyway, they will probably give you SOMETHING even if it’s not 100% or what you need.
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[*] posted on 2-5-2022 at 15:40


I once found a large, very heavy, chemical resistant countertop at a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store for $20. Worth checking around places like that. Never know what you’ll find.



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SuperOxide
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[*] posted on 2-5-2022 at 16:10


Quote: Originally posted by crow6283  
I know this isn’t what you’re asking for… but it’s a lot easier just to build your own to whatever specs you want once you have the hood in front of you. Want to store a pump underneath? No problem. A cup sink? A cup sink is very convenient. I’ve been fortunate enough to buy a couple of hoods of similar size from surplus sales very cheap - one for around 50 USD in fact.
That's actually the same conclusion I'm coming to. I actually did order two of those cup sinks off of Alibaba, and I may look for a goose neck faucet to go with it.
I think what would be best is to just make a temporary one out of plywood and use it for some time, once I know I like the layout then I can make one out of HDPE or epoxy. I will end up putting in a distillation/lettuce rack as well, so I should be damn sure I know where I want everything to be before I start drilling holes in some expensive surface.

Quote: Originally posted by crow6283  
It’s also convenient just to look for old chemical resistant countertops you can put it on. I managed to find one with a sink already in it!
Really? That's interesting. I know my 4' fume hood definitely does't have much room for a sink (just a gooseneck faucet and cup sink), but that does sound pretty neat.
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crow6283
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[*] posted on 3-5-2022 at 09:28


Well to clarify when i said mine are similar sizes they are actually a bit larger one 72” one is 60”.

But the principle is the same I’m just saying building your own gives the opportunity to do whatever you want with it. Another instance is plumbing, the fixtures made for fume hoods for various gas lines are quite expensive, but if you just use stuff from the hardware store and plumb them in from the bottom… we’ll it’s quite easy and cheap to have WHATEVER you want in there.
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[*] posted on 3-5-2022 at 13:41


Quote: Originally posted by crow6283  
Well to clarify when i said mine are similar sizes they are actually a bit larger one 72” one is 60”.

But the principle is the same I’m just saying building your own gives the opportunity to do whatever you want with it. Another instance is plumbing, the fixtures made for fume hoods for various gas lines are quite expensive, but if you just use stuff from the hardware store and plumb them in from the bottom… we’ll it’s quite easy and cheap to have WHATEVER you want in there.

No I understood, and I get what you mean. It actually comes with the "VAC" and "AIR" appliances... I'm wondering if the air one can be used for something else though. And I have a cold water and gas accessories on the way.

But as you said, the cup/rain thing and a gooseneck faucet will need to be put in from the bottom, which is what I will probably have to do (Shouldn't be too hard).

Of course, the first step is.... Get a house. With a garage. So I suppose most of this is a few months away anyhow, lol.

P.S. Do you have any pictures of yours? Maybe the plumbing?

[Edited on 3-5-2022 by SuperOxide]
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Oxy
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[*] posted on 3-5-2022 at 19:18


You can make your own very easily and cheap.
You will need following things:
1) wooden board that you will cut on your own or pre-cut
2) silicone from hardware store
3) Floor tiles - enough to cover all the internal surface
4) Glue and other things that you need to glue tiles

Put some silicone on the edges of the hood which will have contact with the wooden board.
Place the hood on the wood.
Place floor tiles on the internal part of the wood board. Glue it properly, do not forget about proper grouts
When it's done, put some silicon on the internal edges of the hood, just to make it sealed (there is nothing funny when you have a toxic spill in place you thought it will contain it).

Et voila!
Yo have your bottom surface made cheaply. You don't need to worry about chemical compatibility, there is not so much of substances which can damage them. Tiles are hard, they can take some kinetic energy without breaking. They are very, very easy to clean.

If you want to have there a sink then just buy it, make a hole in the place where you want to have it, attach to receiving system and done. As a tap I recommend to use a lab grade tap as they have very good shape which makes easier things like cleaning. It is better to have valves on the outside of hood but you can have it also inside. Just put it close enough to be able to use it without sticking your head to the hood.

A good improvement of the design will be a sill that will prevent any spills from getting outside via the front. Can be also done relatively simple.

It is very easy to do, if you haven't tools needed for that you can order pre-made wooden surface and rent the tile cutting machine. It will take you maybe 2 days, I assume that you will wait for the stuff that you ordered longer than it will take to make the basic type of surface.

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SuperOxide
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[*] posted on 4-5-2022 at 04:56


Quote: Originally posted by Oxy  
You can make your own very easily and cheap.
You will need following things:
1) wooden board that you will cut on your own or pre-cut
2) silicone from hardware store
3) Floor tiles - enough to cover all the internal surface
4) Glue and other things that you need to glue tiles

Put some silicone on the edges of the hood which will have contact with the wooden board.
Place the hood on the wood.
Place floor tiles on the internal part of the wood board. Glue it properly, do not forget about proper grouts
When it's done, put some silicon on the internal edges of the hood, just to make it sealed (there is nothing funny when you have a toxic spill in place you thought it will contain it).

Et voila!
Yo have your bottom surface made cheaply. You don't need to worry about chemical compatibility, there is not so much of substances which can damage them. Tiles are hard, they can take some kinetic energy without breaking. They are very, very easy to clean.

If you want to have there a sink then just buy it, make a hole in the place where you want to have it, attach to receiving system and done. As a tap I recommend to use a lab grade tap as they have very good shape which makes easier things like cleaning. It is better to have valves on the outside of hood but you can have it also inside. Just put it close enough to be able to use it without sticking your head to the hood.

A good improvement of the design will be a sill that will prevent any spills from getting outside via the front. Can be also done relatively simple.

It is very easy to do, if you haven't tools needed for that you can order pre-made wooden surface and rent the tile cutting machine. It will take you maybe 2 days, I assume that you will wait for the stuff that you ordered longer than it will take to make the basic type of surface.



Thanks for the input. I think I like the idea of the spill-stopper kinda thing where it's a dished surface. I may try to do that with wood, then just coat it in epoxy or something. But im not sure I can do that with tile, at least not as well (but I could be wrong)
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