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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 22-5-2024 at 19:11
bacteria


howdy forum its been a minute. i have been struggling with gut bacteria for a while and need to keep my stomach more acidic.i found this electrolyte i like because it has plenty potassium but the potassium is in form of potassium bicarbonate.it fizzes in water making it like a soda but sodas are bad for me.question is if i want to make it less basic will vinegar balance the alkiline?i know water takes out some of the fizz after a while because it stops bubbling.i got ph strips but i thought i ask first.
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Sir_Gawain
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[*] posted on 22-5-2024 at 20:25


Using vinegar should work, but it will taste better if you’d use citric acid.



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Sulaiman
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[*] posted on 22-5-2024 at 20:26


If you dissolve bicarbonate in water then heat to well over 50C,
the bicarbonate will decompose by releasing CO2 and becoming carbonate.
This will be as alkaline but will release 1/2 the CO2 when ingested.




CAUTION : Hobby Chemist, not Professional or even Amateur
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Precipitates
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 02:02


Quote: Originally posted by Sir_Gawain  
Using vinegar should work, but it will taste better if you’d use citric acid.


Yes, use citric acid.

By my crude calculations:

Potassium bicarbonate (1 tsp = approx 4 g) + citric acid (7.7 g = 5.5 ounces of lemon juice = 3-4 lemons) should give you monopotassium citrate, which is mildly acidic, so should keep your stomach more acidic I guess!

[Edited on 23-5-2024 by Precipitates]
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leau
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 04:20


If your:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiome?wprov=sfla1

Is toxic then perhaps some beneficial microorganisms should be consumed :cool:
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bnull
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 08:34


Why not a lemonade? Mix the electrolyte with some lemon juice, add water and sugar. Or orange juice. You'll solve the acidity problem while getting some vitamins.

Did you go to the doctor's? Maybe, like Paul Dirac, you're not producing gastric acid enough.




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leau
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 09:10


Regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota: Implications for psychoneuroendocrinology

Timothy G. Dinan & John F. Cryan

Psychoneuroendocrinology (2012) 37, 1369—1378

doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.03.007

There is now an expanding volume of evidence to support the view that commensal organisms within the gut play a role in early programming and later responsivity of the stress system. The gut is inhabited by 1013—1014 micro-organisms, which is ten times the number of cells in the human body and contains 150 times as many genes as our genome. It has long been recognised that gut pathogens such as Escherichia coli, if they enter the gut can activate the HPA. However, animals raised in a germ-free environment show exaggerated HPA responses to psychological stress, which normalises with monocolonisation by certain bacterial species including Bifidobacterium infantis. Moreover, increased evidence suggests that animals treated with probiotics have a blunted HPA response. Stress induces increased permeability of the gut allowing bacteria and bacterial antigens to cross the epithelial barrier and activate a mucosal immune response, which in turn alters the composition of the microbiome and leads to enhanced HPA drive. Increasing data from patients with irritable bowel syndrome and major depression indicate that in these syndromes alteration of the HPA may be induced by increased gut permeability. In the case of irritable bowel syndrome the increased permeability can respond to probiotic therapy. Detailed prospective studies in patients with mood disorders examining the gut microbiota, immune parameters and HPA activity are required to throw further light on this emerging area. It is however clear that the gut microbiota must be taken into account when considering the factors regulating the HPA.


is attached :cool:

Attachment: gut microbiome and stress ms9.pdf (582kB)
This file has been downloaded 74 times

[Edited on 23-5-2024 by leau]
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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:29


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
If you dissolve bicarbonate in water then heat to well over 50C,
the bicarbonate will decompose by releasing CO2 and becoming carbonate.
This will be as alkaline but will release 1/2 the CO2 when ingested.
50 c is 122f heck one summers day in texas is almost there. thanks thats easy peasy
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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:37


Quote: Originally posted by Precipitates  
Quote: Originally posted by Sir_Gawain  
Using vinegar should work, but it will taste better if you’d use citric acid.


Yes, use citric acid.

By my crude calculations:

Potassium bicarbonate (1 tsp = approx 4 g) + citric acid (7.7 g = 5.5 ounces of lemon juice = 3-4 lemons) should give you monopotassium citrate, which is mildly acidic, so should keep your stomach more acidic I guess!

[Edited on 23-5-2024 by Precipitates]
1 tsp is actual dose of whole ingredients and the potassium bicarbonate in question is 400mg a good dose of potassium but not the carbonate i guess. so maybe wont need too many lemons? thanks!
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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:41


Quote: Originally posted by bnull  
Why not a lemonade? Mix the electrolyte with some lemon juice, add water and sugar. Or orange juice. You'll solve the acidity problem while getting some vitamins.

Did you go to the doctor's? Maybe, like Paul Dirac, you're not producing gastric acid enough.
yeah been to doc. i got hpylori like 1/2 of the world's population but my is out of control so lots of anxiety which is what cause low stomach acid to began with.3 rounds of antibiotics and been 2yrs trying to repopulate good bacteria. i dehydrate quickly because the damn bug blocks magnesium absorption.thanks!
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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:50


Quote: Originally posted by leau  
Regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota: Implications for psychoneuroendocrinology

Timothy G. Dinan & John F. Cryan

Psychoneuroendocrinology (2012) 37, 1369—1378

doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.03.007

There is now an expanding volume of evidence to support the view that commensal organisms within the gut play a role in early programming and later responsivity of the stress system. The gut is inhabited by 1013—1014 micro-organisms, which is ten times the number of cells in the human body and contains 150 times as many genes as our genome. It has long been recognised that gut pathogens such as Escherichia coli, if they enter the gut can activate the HPA. However, animals raised in a germ-free environment show exaggerated HPA responses to psychological stress, which normalises with monocolonisation by certain bacterial species including Bifidobacterium infantis. Moreover, increased evidence suggests that animals treated with probiotics have a blunted HPA response. Stress induces increased permeability of the gut allowing bacteria and bacterial antigens to cross the epithelial barrier and activate a mucosal immune response, which in turn alters the composition of the microbiome and leads to enhanced HPA drive. Increasing data from patients with irritable bowel syndrome and major depression indicate that in these syndromes alteration of the HPA may be induced by increased gut permeability. In the case of irritable bowel syndrome the increased permeability can respond to probiotic therapy. Detailed prospective studies in patients with mood disorders examining the gut microbiota, immune parameters and HPA activity are required to throw further light on this emerging area. It is however clear that the gut microbiota must be taken into account when considering the factors regulating the HPA.


is attached :cool:



[Edited on 23-5-2024 by leau]
thanks man! yep i got hpylori i thought i was having a heart attack but its a damn stomach bug that cause ulcers.i remember paul harvey say a dr won nobel peace prize for discovering cause of ulcers.up until then we thought ulcers were caused by hot food and beer.some old timers were on the right track because the noticed worry worts were prone to ulcers. actually worts are are also more prevalent on peple with anxiety.worry wort?haha.thats been around for centuries.
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:51


Quote: Originally posted by leau  
If your:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiome?wprov=sfla1

Is toxic then perhaps some beneficial microorganisms should be consumed :cool:
thank you!
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cyanureeves
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[*] posted on 23-5-2024 at 15:54


i forgot how to rely properly its been a while. carry on madnessers!
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[*] posted on 24-5-2024 at 10:01


Probiotics, prebiotics, and the host microbiome: the science of translation

Bryon Petschow, Joel Dore, Patricia Hibberd, Timothy Dinan, Gregor Reid, Martin Blaser, Patrice D. Cani, Fred H. Degnan, Jane Foster, Glenn Gibson, John Hutton, Todd R. Klaenhammer, Ruth Ley, Max Nieuwdorp, Bruno Pot, David Relman, Andrew Serazin, and Mary Ellen Sanders

Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923

ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Recent advances in our understanding of the community structure and function of the human microbiome have implications for the potential role of probiotics and prebiotics in promoting human health. A group of experts recently met to review the latest advances in microbiota/microbiome research and discuss the implications for development of probiotics and prebiotics, primarily as they relate to effects mediated via the intestine. The goals of the meeting were to share recent advances in research on the microbiota, microbiome, probiotics, and prebiotics, and to discuss these findings in the contexts of regulatory barriers, evolving healthcare environments, and potential effects on a variety of health topics, including the development of obesity and diabetes; the long-term consequences of exposure to antibiotics early in life to the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota; lactose intolerance; and the relationship between the GI microbiota and the central nervous system, with implications for depression, cognition, satiety, and mental health for people living in developed and developing countries. This report provides an overview of these discussions

The Role of Prebiotics and Probiotics in Human Health: A Systematic Review with a Focus on Gut and Immune Health

Gill Jenkins & Pamela Mason

Food Nutr J 7: 245. DOI: 10.29011/2575-7091.100245

Probiotics, and more recently prebiotics, are the subject of increasing research for an understanding of their impact on the gut microbiota, gut health and immune health. The science is advancing, with benefits of probiotics in certain types of diarrhoea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and also eczema in children well established. The study of the gut microbiota is leading to the discovery of potential benefits in organs beyond the gut including the brain, cardiometabolic system, the lungs, the eyes and the oral cavity. Researchers are beginning to understand the mechanisms by which these health outcomes occur and are obtaining clinical evidence supporting these newly emerging areas. This review describes the concept of probiotics and prebiotics, explains the importance of the gut microbiota in health and disease and discusses the role of probiotics in gut and immune health as well as clinical evidence-based interventions with probiotic and prebiotic supplements.


are attached :cool:

Attachment: Probiotics-in-Human-Health-A-Systematic-Review-with-a-Focus-on-Gut-and-Immune-Health.pdf.zip (1.5MB)
This file has been downloaded 54 times

[Edited on 24-5-2024 by leau]
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[*] posted on 27-5-2024 at 12:53


Greetings, here's my medical advice.

Earlier this year I suffered gastroenteritis. Then, for a whole week, all my defecations were diarrhea, no matter how much vegetables I eat.

Then, my mom gave me garlic, I ate ~5 whole pieces of garlic for lunch and another ~5 pieces of garlic for dinner, and that completely solved by diarrhea problems.

Garlic is by far, the most anti-bacteria food to eat.
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