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Author: Subject: Occurrence of Chemical Elements in Household Substances
LanthanumK
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[*] posted on 23-5-2011 at 07:04
Occurrence of Chemical Elements in Household Substances


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[Edited on 23-5-2011 by LanthanumK]

[Edited on 23-5-2011 by LanthanumK]
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 1-8-2011 at 05:25


Yes.

Radon: An air sample from my basement, contains 6ppm Rn gas :D
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Mixell
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[*] posted on 1-8-2011 at 05:54


Lutetium is also used as a phosphor in some LED light bulbs, although its extremely hard to separate it from other rare earth elements.
Thallium: thallium oxide used in some high index refraction glass, thallium halogens (especially bromide and iodide) are used in infrared optical devices. Thallium sulfide is used in photo-resistors and thallium-mercury alloy (8-9% thallium) is used in low temperature thermometers.
Thulium- Thulium-chromium-holmium alloy is used in some lasers, especially those used in surgery. Also, it is used in some portable X-ray devices.

Basically all of the above mentioned elements are hard to get, unless you stumble upon some broken parts of the above mentioned devices.
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Mr. Wizard
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[*] posted on 1-8-2011 at 06:53


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  
Yes.

Radon: An air sample from my basement, contains 6ppm Rn gas :D


That does seem rather high. Do you live over a Uranium mine?
From Wijki:
The average concentration of radon in the atmosphere is about 6×10−20 atoms of radon for each molecule in the air, or about 150 atoms in each ml of air.

Your concentration is 6x10-6 or about 10^14 higher than normal.

Maybe I don't understand?

What is the radiation level in Bq/m^3 (Becquerels / cubic meter) or picocuries per liter ( pC/L)
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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 2-8-2011 at 08:15


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Wizard  
That does seem rather high. Do you live over a Uranium mine?


Perhaps "White Yeti" refers to his glowing in the dark? ;)
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 2-8-2011 at 14:20


Just a joke.
Lighten up guys. I don't know if I have radon in my basement, although I know some of my neighbours have radioactive basements.

In any case, you can't collect and store radon, it has a half life of a few days. The best you can do is find some uranium ore, or yellowcake and put it into a vial. if you've gone through all that trouble, you might be the proud owner of a few atoms of radon. I, personally, wouldn't bother. I'd rather take the air in my basement, put it into a glass vial, and say it contains traces of radon.
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Mister Junk Pile
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[*] posted on 2-8-2011 at 19:42


But, as you said, it wouldn't contain traces of radon for long. If you kept 1 mL of air in a vial and it contained about 7x the average amount (1000 atoms per mL...) it would be all gone in about 5 weeks. It would be better to just keep a beaker sitting there open to the air. That way it would always contain at least one radon atom.



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