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Kevintowe
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biggrin.gif posted on 10-7-2011 at 17:04
Ordering glassware


I am relatively new to the whole homemade chemistry and stuff, but I have quickly found out that i require some glassware along with some other basic materials. So if anyone could suggest some ideas for me, like what all to get and where to get it, that would be great:)
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Bot0nist
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[*] posted on 10-7-2011 at 17:40


What are you interested in trying? Have you had a look at <a href="http://woelen.homescience.net/science/chem/index.html">woelen's site?</a> :

Plug the title of this thread into this site's search feature and you will find many similar threads. A whole lot can be done with just some test tubes, beakers, and an odd flask. As you advance further you can get more specialty items as needed. What sort of chemistry sparks your interest?

Some recommendations:

Get a few texts and a couple blank journals so start with. Take note of the different reactions and mechanisms that you want to try, and work them on paper. Learn stichometry, proper measuring and unit conversion, etc.

Play around with what you can find around the house. Focus on learning the principles and the science of what you can do before spending on equipment. This will assure that you get much more joy, and understanding out of everything that will follow.

Get some cheap "student grade" glassware and lab equipment and try and see what reagents you can salvage and create from everyday products. Again, focus on the science and strive to identify each end product with good technique. Take lots of notes.

Take the time to always focus on the safety of yourself and those around you.


:EDIT:
Many reagents can be found locally with some work, but online ordering is a must for many things.

Here is two popular and trusted sites that cater to the amateur hobbyist. Each offering an array of glassware, lab equipment, and chemicals available to the individual.

<a href="http://www.elementalscientific.net/">Elemental Scientific</a>

<a href="http://www.unitednuclear.com/">United Nuclear</a>

[Edited on 11-7-2011 by Bot0nist]




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Kevintowe
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[*] posted on 10-7-2011 at 17:48


Thanks for the advice. Do you have any recommendations for texts to buy, like something I could buy at barnes and noble, and just to narrow any recommendations I have already taken a high school course in chemistry and am taking an Ap course next year along with some Ap physics and bio so I have a rather basic base built
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[*] posted on 10-7-2011 at 17:50


Academic texts are a good place to start. Check out our <a href="http://library.sciencemadness.org/library/index.html">free library here at SciMad</a>. Lots of in depth stuff free for download.




[Edited on 11-7-2011 by Bot0nist]




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bob800
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[*] posted on 10-7-2011 at 18:59


I would suggest buying Robert Bruce Thompson's book Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments, available at most bookstores. If nothing else, it contains a very useful section on setting up your lab, what glass to buy, etc.
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[*] posted on 10-7-2011 at 19:25


I also like the different sets that Elemental Scientific has that go with the "Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments" by Robert Thompson

http://www.elementalscientific.net/store/scripts/prodList.as...

For 44 bucks you can get some basic reagents and the book, Spend a bit more and get the standard or advanced set and glassware.




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Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 11-7-2011 at 09:53


I will shamelessly self-promote my post here, as I have lots of basic, used, glassware for a low price available. The post below has a spreadsheet with many basic items at very low prices. I still have most sizes of beakers, flasks and other basic items.

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=15667&...

As for books, look at Amazon and try to buy some older edition organic books, Fieser and Fieser being a good choice. You should be able to buy used copies of most chemistry textbooks for a few dollars apiece. Goodwill and other Thrift stores often have old textbooks for a dollar.

Bob
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Kevintowe
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[*] posted on 12-7-2011 at 10:41


If this is to much work you can just ignore this, but would you mind putting together a list of stuff I might need. Im kinda too new at this to know exactly what to buy so normally I would just wait, but this seems like a good offer and I don't want to pass it up.
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Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 12-7-2011 at 11:26


It really depends on what you are planning on doing. If you want to check out general chemistry, mostly beakers, erlenmeyer flasks, a few grad cylinders, and that will do a lot. If you want to try any organic chemistry, then a few round bottom flasks are good for a start. Organic work gets much more complex and expensive, especially if you want to run distillations or other more complex reactions. I would not start there unless you know what you are doing.

The main thing is not to heat glassware that is not heat safe. That means use a Pyrex (or similar brand glass) container if you are heating any liquids or mixing acids with water (which generates a lot of heat). Trying to heat chemicals in a soda lime glass container can cause it to break with bad things happening.

But I would read some other people's experiments here and then try to see what they used to do it. You can do a lot of chemistry in paper cups and disposable containers to start out with. That is what I did, many years back. It is very handy should they catch fire or turn into black tar.... :-)

Bob
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[*] posted on 12-7-2011 at 13:07


Start witht the following and keep building:

Test tubes
250mL conical flask
250mL florence flask
100mL beaker
2 250mL beakers
600mL beaker
100mL volumetric flask
and a couple cylinders

Or you can buy this. THis is how I started:
http://www.hometrainingtools.com/chemistry-equipment-kit/p/C...




hey, if you are reading this, I can't U2U, but you are always welcome to send me an email!


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[*] posted on 13-7-2011 at 19:11


is it common for ground joints to wear out? i have a used 24/40 adaptor arm and was wondering if it was wore out,it still locks good after giving it a half twist but i dont know. i read something about teflon tape here but it wasnt elaborated on further. i saw myfanwy's video on cyanide and instantly thought about how my set-up leaked out all the nitric and it could've been disastrous had i actually bought phosphoric acid. my homemade lab stand and clamps are the culprits because i need a better way to hold down the glassware because it moves when i go to tighten everything .what chemicals could be used as a safe test to check for malfunctions or defects?
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UnintentionalChaos
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[*] posted on 13-7-2011 at 19:23


Glass joints shouldn't lock...use grease. And liberal numbers of keck clips, but never rely on them. Treat them mostly as failsafes.



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[*] posted on 14-7-2011 at 07:27


Where would someone buy large glassware? For example....

Two 10 liter boiling flasks with glass joints and a condencer to scale. (Don't forget about the adaptors.)

A setup like this would be useful for preparing solvents.
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[*] posted on 19-7-2011 at 04:42


Quote: Originally posted by overload  
Where would someone buy large glassware? For example....

Two 10 liter boiling flasks with glass joints and a condencer to scale. (Don't forget about the adaptors.)

A setup like this would be useful for preparing solvents.


The best thing is to order it from a glassblower or a flameworker (they are more common these days, as glassblowing is mostly done by robots).
That way you can save lots of money, because companies that sell glassware are actually buying it from the glassblowers/flameworkers. :)

And the worst idea is to ask a third party (for example local pharmacy) to do buy it from a company, as they will add a third expense, and then you get a 10$ flask for 20$. :mad:


Find yourself a great old guy that's still working with his torch and draw him a few sketches. Those guys are usually happy to help homemade chemists.
Today, most of them buy ground glass joints, flasks and tubes, and just modify them. The end result is rarely sterile looking as it was made by a robot, but it is functional and has a unique touch to it.




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SovereignSolip
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[*] posted on 23-7-2011 at 12:12


Yeah I met a retired scientific glass blower that worked for corning for like 40 years. He was able to work from BC with his own team for like 15 years paid by corning. He mostly works on ornamental stuff that he sells with his wife. Glass candles that are completely made by the torch, even the wicks.

I have got him to make me double jacket-reflux condenser as well as a couple chromatography columns he didn't charge me for labour! :D

[Edited on 23-7-2011 by SovereignSolip]
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Rosco Bodine
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[*] posted on 23-7-2011 at 13:49


Quote: Originally posted by overload  
Where would someone buy large glassware?


large huh, okay.......Here ya go

http://cgi.ebay.com/Chemglass-50-liter-reactor-system-new-/2...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFXXQYPB8A0 Put your ear to a seashell and what do you hear :D

[Edited on 23-7-2011 by Rosco Bodine]
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