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Author: Subject: Pressure resistant test tube?
ryan0713
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[*] posted on 25-9-2011 at 13:32
Pressure resistant test tube?


Is there a clear, sealable test-tube that can withstand pressures of 5.1 atm. or more? If so, how much does it cost?
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bbartlog
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[*] posted on 25-9-2011 at 15:42


Internal or external pressure? Anyway, five atmospheres is nothing extraordinary so far as the strength of the glass (for small test tubes) is concerned, it's more a question of finding a stopper that won't be blown out.
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ryan0713
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[*] posted on 25-9-2011 at 16:01


I plan to liquify dry ice in it. Once dry ice hits 5.1 atm. it liquifies. Pressure will go up steadily after that and that is why I need something that can resist very high pressure. Preferably with a screw-on cap.
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smuv
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[*] posted on 25-9-2011 at 20:31


They are called pressure tubes/ace tubes. They sometimes come on ebay called pressure vessels.
http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/labware/labware-products.html?Ta...

You could also improvise something, as 5atm is not too bad for smaller containers
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=11637&...

Use a rubber cork/stopper. Natural corks always leak.

Edit: definitely these can't do the 60atm required to liquify CO2 at room temp, so you are going to have to use a satisfactory cooling setup.

[Edited on 9-26-2011 by smuv]




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bbartlog
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[*] posted on 26-9-2011 at 14:36


Ah, so 5.1 atmospheres is really just your starting point. Well, I have seen mention in 19th century texts of use of thick-walled beer bottles up to pressures of 20 atmospheres; however, I really don't think that I would use glass here given that you will be starting at such low temperatures (and potentially going to multiple kpsi if you lose control of the temperature). If you want visible liquid CO2 (like the guy who posted on here recently), I recommend basically the same approach he took.
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[*] posted on 27-9-2011 at 05:35


Soda Bottle Preforms :) They can easily take 150PSI with the existing cap. Make a better cap, it could be more than 300PSI (but this is speculation).

http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-GEOCACHE-SODA-BOTTLE-PREFORM-CONTA...
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LIGAND
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thumbup.gif posted on 27-9-2011 at 06:31


i feel u can use test tubes made of quartz...they are really costly....but normal lab glasses i.e. schott dhuran or Merck glass can be used, provided u make glass hooks on glass stoppers with springs. all-glass setup is useful. ask Ur manufacturer to mend it with standard joint. i am sure u will succeed with no hazard bcz 5 atmp is withstand-able by these glasses as they can withstand vacuum up to 0.01 mm of Hg.
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[*] posted on 27-9-2011 at 09:23


@Ligand- Glassware handling a vacuum can be MUCH less mechanically complex than withstanding pressure- A vacuum of 10^-20 torr is still only about 14.7PSI :) 5 ATM is about 73.5PSI.
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Mildronate
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[*] posted on 27-9-2011 at 09:48


you can make test tube from steel pipe
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Endimion17
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[*] posted on 29-9-2011 at 11:02


Quote: Originally posted by Mildronate  
you can make test tube from steel pipe


What's the point of making a test tube from an opaque material, if his goal is to see liquid carbon dioxide?

Not to mention that your idea is a perfect starting point for a "pipe bomb gone wrong" scenario.




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peach
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[*] posted on 29-9-2011 at 11:46


See this thread



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gutter_ca
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[*] posted on 29-9-2011 at 13:58


http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2004/GC/b40581...

Liquid CO2 extraction as developed for teaching labs
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Mildronate
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[*] posted on 29-9-2011 at 23:51


Quote: Originally posted by Endimion17  
Quote: Originally posted by Mildronate  
you can make test tube from steel pipe


What's the point of making a test tube from an opaque material, if his goal is to see liquid carbon dioxide?

Not to mention that your idea is a perfect starting point for a "pipe bomb gone wrong" scenario.


It not gone wrong if you calculate it, a friend of mine make thermal rubines in "pipe bomb".
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