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Author: Subject: Weird Names...
mineralman
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[*] posted on 19-6-2012 at 07:15


:D YES & NO, I was also curious as to the origin of the name.
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MR AZIDE
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[*] posted on 19-6-2012 at 11:03



I like Titanic Sulphate, Titanic Chloride etc........



Cummingtonite (Mg,Fe)7Si8O22(OH)2:D

Mannose......

I like Mercurous....i.e mercurous chloride,

linalool , ( linalo-ol...????)

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mineralman
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[*] posted on 19-6-2012 at 11:49


BOTRYOIDAL HEMIMORPHITE, When you get into minerals, theres some corkers out there. hope it counts MM
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Rich_Insane
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[*] posted on 19-6-2012 at 12:20


I always knew chemists had a sense of humor :D
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MrTechGuy1995
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[*] posted on 20-6-2012 at 14:33


Phallic Acid <==> Phthalic Acid

I feel bad for people who have slurs.




Currently in college, studying Computer Science. Missing my home laboratory, and all the fun things I got to do. Still trying to explore the outskirts of chemistry for curiosities sake.
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thelonious
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[*] posted on 20-6-2012 at 19:26


Quote: Originally posted by AndersHoveland  

And KClO4 is referred to as perchlorate, although it does not contain any oxygen-oxygen bonds.


I was taught that the per- is short for hyper- and indicates a higher oxidation state, although I could be wrong
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woelen
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[*] posted on 21-6-2012 at 00:10


The per-prefix comes from old times, when there was no knowledge on the structure of molecules and ions. People only knew the net formula.

They knew H2O and H2O2, hydrogen oxide and hydrogen peroxide.
They knew NaBO2 and NaBO3, sodium metaborate and sodium metaperborate.
They also knew BaO and BaO2, barium oxide and barium peroxide

The above are real peroxides. More examples are K2SO5, Na2S2O8.

There also are many compounds with very similar net formula, the difference being just a single oxygen atom, or having less of the other elements, relative to the oxygen.

Examples are KClO3 and KClO4, K2MnO4 and KMnO4. The more oxygen-rich compound received the per-prefix in its name. More oxygen-deficient chemicals received the -ite ending in its name, e.g. NaClO2, K2MnO3, Na2SO3.

Nowadays we know the essential difference between e.g. KClO4 and Na2SO5, but the old names survive and noone is willing to use the full IUPAC names for these components:
potassium tetraoxo chlorate(VII)
sodium monoperoxo trioxo sulfate(VI)

A compound like K3CrO8 has no common name from old times, because it was not known yet. In this case the IUPAC name is used:
potassium tetraperoxo chromate(V)

The full names can be simplified by leaving out all oxo-ligands and assuming these implicitly. The above names then become
potassium chlorate(VII)
sodium monoperoxo sulfate(VI)
potassium tetraperoxo chromate(V)
Only other ligands, other than oxygen are explicitly named. Common ligands can be fluoro, peroxo, chloro, cyano, hydroxo. E.g. Na2PFO3 is called sodium monofluorophosphate(V).




The art of wondering makes life worth living...
Want to wonder? Look at https://woelen.homescience.net
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DoctorOfPhilosophy
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[*] posted on 27-6-2012 at 23:30


Here's a big list
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chemical_compounds_with...
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Adas
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[*] posted on 24-4-2013 at 05:49


Tropic amide :D



Rest In Pieces!
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papaya
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[*] posted on 24-4-2013 at 11:59


luciferin ?:mad:
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mr.crow
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[*] posted on 24-4-2013 at 12:33


I think this thread has been beaten into the ground



Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble
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Antiswat
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[*] posted on 25-4-2013 at 06:10


not really a chemical, but of the binary explosive of ammonium nitrate and aluminium shortened to ANAL you get obvious comments regarding this on every video.. (:



~25 drops = 1mL @dH2O viscocity - STP
Truth is ever growing - but without context theres barely any such.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_table
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ParadoxChem126
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[*] posted on 25-6-2013 at 09:37


Churchane, basketane, bowtiediene...
Made me laugh :D




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Adas
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[*] posted on 13-3-2014 at 14:46


THEBACON rules them all :D



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numos
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[*] posted on 13-3-2014 at 20:50


Penguinone ^^






This has got to be the most adorable molecule in existence. :D
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Pyro
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[*] posted on 15-3-2014 at 18:42


Quote: Originally posted by mineralman  
Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".


Is that anything to do with the guy who put a cat in a box with a time release of poison gas.?
MM

You mean Erwin Schrodinger




all above information is intellectual property of Pyro. :D
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thesmug
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[*] posted on 15-3-2014 at 18:59


Quote: Originally posted by mineralman  
Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
My favourite is diethyl diazocarboxylate, which is known as "DEADCAT".


Is that anything to do with the guy who put a cat in a box with a time release of poison gas.?
He hypothasised that the cat was both dead & alive. not knowing when the gas would be released, he wouldn't know for sure if either was the actual fact at the time. (hope that made sense) MM

Nope, comes from Diethyl azodicarboxylate.
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unionised
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[*] posted on 16-3-2014 at 02:19


Does anyone know how you make Ethyl lactate?
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