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Author: Subject: Most extreme compounds known to man
JibbyDee
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 10:59
Most extreme compounds known to man


I like to know examples of compounds that exhibit a specific property more than any other known compound, so I can use it as a reference point. I'll throw in my knowledge, can you add your own knowledge of the most extreme compounds. If you know multiple extreme compounds list your top 3, in order of descending extremity.

Strongest Taste
Denatonium Benzoate

They add trace amounts of this to denatured alcohol to instill in it, an extremely bitter taste which would deter most people from drinking it.


Smelliest
Ethanethiol

According to the wiki page, this compound held the 2000 Guinness world record for smelliest compound. I'm sure there are smellier ones though.


Most Flammable
Chlorine Trifluoride

From what I read, the nazis were interested in this compounds potential as an incendiary but concluded that it was too dangerous to handle and abandoned it.


Most Explosive
Octanitrocubane

From what I've read, cubanes cubic shape allows it to pack very well so octanitrocubane contains a much greater amount of nitro groups per cubic centimeter than other nitro explosives such as TNT.


Most Acidic
Fluoroantimonic Acid

An antimony-fluorine complex which is supposedly 2 x 10^19 times more acidic than pure sulfuric acid. I like this one because its the first time I've seen antimony used to create a property that as of yet, cannot be produced with other elements.

Carborane Acid

From what I've read, trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was the strongest acid known up until carborane acid was discovered.

Trifluoromethanesulfonic Acid

I like to think of this compound as sulfuric acid on steroids. Fluorinating a weak acid like acetic acid results in trifluoroacetic acid, the strongest known carboxylic acid which has a pKa of -0.25. Fluorinating a strong acid such as sulphuric acid results in fluorosulphonic acid which has a pKa of -14. Attach a methyl group so that triple the amount of fluorine atoms can be attached and you get trifluoromethanesulphonic acid which has a pKa of -16.


I have way more to add to that list but I'll leave it at that for now.

[Edited on 17-12-2011 by JibbyDee]
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 11:57


Chlorine Trifluoride isn't flammable at all. It just causes most fuels to auto ignite. It has a rating of 0 for flammability on its MSDS.

Cool thread concept though.





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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 11:59


That's very interesting topic. Especially the first one.



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Bot0nist
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 12:37


Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
That's very interesting topic. Especially the first one.


Its in almost everything as a bitterant. Check your "100% Acetone" bottle's ingredients.




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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 13:00


I have been wondering for quite some time if there is any compound that has 4/4/4 in NFPA 704 danger classification.

If anyone knows, let us know also.
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 15:58


The Germans didn't abandon ClF3. It was never successfully weaponized but they produced multi-ton quantities of the stuff. The Russians eventually captured the factory, I believe.
I can't recall seeing a 4/4/4 danger classification. But good old hydrazine is 4/4/3.
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 16:52


Quote: Originally posted by bbartlog  
The Germans didn't abandon ClF3. It was never successfully weaponized but they produced multi-ton quantities of the stuff. The Russians eventually captured the factory, I believe.
I can't recall seeing a 4/4/4 danger classification. But good old hydrazine is 4/4/3.


Yeah, I've seen quite a couple of chemicals with 4/4/3, like diborane, germane etc, but never a 4/4/4.
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[*] posted on 17-12-2011 at 18:21


Quote:
Its in almost everything as a bitterant. Check your "100% Acetone" bottle's ingredients.


Checked it. No denatonium benzoate.




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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 02:29


Quote:
Most Explosive

Least meaningful . . .

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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 06:08


Also quite 'extreme': XeO4



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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 07:10


dicyanoacetylene => the hottest known flame temperature (5260K / 4900C in oxygen)

3-Nitrobenzanthrone => most carcinogenic compound known (identified in diesel exhaust)
1,8-dinitropyrene => second most carcinogenic compound known (also from diesel exhaust...)




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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 08:22


nitrogene triiodide has been poorly studied because of its well known sensitivity
copper acetylide is the only explosive as far as i could find that doesnt produce gasses when detonated.

tungsten carbide melts at 2800c and boil at 6000!
lithium fluoride is probably the most stable salt i`ve seen
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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 08:45


Quote: Originally posted by MagicJigPipe  
Quote:
Its in almost everything as a bitterant. Check your "100% Acetone" bottle's ingredients.


Checked it. No denatonium benzoate.






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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 08:50


Fluorine (F2) is the strongest oxidizing agent if I'm not wrong.
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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 09:30


I thought lead azide has the fastest velocity of propagation for non-nuclear explosives. Does Octanitrocubane beat it ?.
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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 10:07


yup nothing beats good old fluorine ... violents reaction garranteed with H2 even with liquid hydrogen at 20 K when F2 is solid
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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 10:50


The two most oxidizing compounds that has been isolated contain the AgF2[+] or NiF3[+] ions. From what I know, researchers have been unable to determine which is stronger because it is so difficult to measure. These ions are so oxidizing that they can spontaneously oxidize chlorine to all the way to ClF6[+].

http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?Location=U2&doc=Get...

Technically, the "strongest" acid yet prepared is dodeca-fluorocarborane acid, http://www.nature.com/news/2004/041115/full/news041115-5.htm...

B(CF3)4[-] is the probably the most inert anion, with the least interaction towards "naked" hydrogen ions.
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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 13:51


The smallest (neutral) atom is the hydrogen atom. Bet you guys didn't see that one coming.



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[*] posted on 18-12-2011 at 18:30


Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  
Also quite 'extreme': XeO4
I already read somthing about this compound and XeO3 , but how the hell , A compound of oxygen and an inert gas can exist at 0degree C....

[Edited on 19-12-2011 by plante1999]




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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 05:09


F2 is such an energetic oxidizer it will capture an electron from ALL other elements exept Helium , Neon and Argon...
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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 07:04


Quote: Originally posted by Bot0nist  
Chlorine Trifluoride isn't flammable at all. It just causes most fuels to auto ignite. It has a rating of 0 for flammability on its MSDS.

Cool thread concept though.



It is a tad better than that, not many things are hypergolic with asbestos! :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorine_trifluoride#Rocket_pro...
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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 10:58
Dimethyl Mercury


Most potent inorganic neurotoxin (I think Botulism is actually the most potent neurotoxin but given that it is a naturally occurring protein, I'm not sure where it should sit in a chemical taxonomy).
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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 11:49
Dihydrogen Monoxide


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111109111536.ht...
http://www.neatorama.com/2008/08/22/5-really-weird-things-ab...

Water, while extremely common to us, is really rather weird.

[Edited on 19-12-2011 by Bot0nist]




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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 14:12


The hardest material known: Aggregated diamond nanorods



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[*] posted on 19-12-2011 at 15:47


Quote: Originally posted by paulr1234  
Most potent inorganic neurotoxin (I think Botulism is actually the most potent neurotoxin but given that it is a naturally occurring protein, I'm not sure where it should sit in a chemical taxonomy).


Botulinum is in fact the most acutely toxic substance known. Less than a kilo is enough to kill the whole planet.
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