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Author: Subject: Most extreme compounds known to man
Fusionfire
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[*] posted on 25-1-2012 at 05:19


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Wizard  
Mono atomic Hydrogen combining to form H2. The reaction of H + H =H2 +422 kJ energy is more powerful than any other chemical reaction per unit mass. Some work has been done studying small amounts of H monatomic gas at very low (< 1K) temperatures and using a strong magnetic field. The gas has been used in Atomic hydrogen welding, but is generated at the tips of Tungsten electrodes in an arc, and only lasts until it strikes the cooler surfaces of the 'work', where it combines to produce it's prodigious energy. As a comparison 2 H2(g) + O2(g) → 2 H2O(l) + 572 kJ (286 kJ/mol) which weighs 36 grams per Mole of product, or 18 times as heavy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen

http://www.weldingarticle.com/atomic-hydrogen-welding/atomic...

and 'cough' ;-)
http://www.lateralscience.co.uk/AtomicH/atomicH.html

http://www.science.uva.nl/research/quant/sph.html


Very interesting. Anyone have this pdf about atomic hydrogen?

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ja01392a011
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rstar
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[*] posted on 25-1-2012 at 10:15


I think the strongest base is n-Butyllithium

eh... don't laugh...
..I might be wrong !!:P




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Adas
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[*] posted on 25-1-2012 at 11:03


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I think the strongest base is n-Butyllithium



What about n-Pentylrubidium? :D JK




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[*] posted on 25-1-2012 at 12:00


Quote: Originally posted by Methyl.Magic  
The organotellurium have the palm of the most putrid compound. Chemistry of telluride cannot be really investigated because chemists wouldnt work with this element anymore since they lost their wife and their friends because when some telluride compound are in the body they slowly diffuses a stroug garlic odour out of the skin that can lasts up to one year according to some source I've forgotten...

That's mostly old wives' tales. Yes they're bad, but not that bad. The body gets rid of Te compounds quite easily (easier than Se).
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[*] posted on 26-1-2012 at 03:56


Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I think the strongest base is n-Butyllithium



What about n-Pentylrubidium? :D JK


n-hexylcesium and n-heptylfrancium ? ;)




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[*] posted on 26-1-2012 at 12:02


n-octylununennium? :P

[Edited on 1-26-2012 by AirCowPeaCock]




BOLD

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[*] posted on 26-1-2012 at 12:43


TROLL
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[*] posted on 26-1-2012 at 15:43


Quote: Originally posted by GreenD  
TROLL


Hold on, don't jump to conclusions just yet.




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Mr. Wizard
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[*] posted on 27-1-2012 at 09:19


Fusionfire, I hadn't seen that interesting pdf about atomic hydrogen. I found a page in my McGraw / Hill Encyclopedia of Chemistry 2nd Edition, that gives104.2 kcal / mole at 25 degrees C which corresponds well with the value in your reference. Converting from joules it is a close match.


monatomic hydrogen scan.jpg - 169kB
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Fusionfire
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[*] posted on 27-1-2012 at 10:40


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Wizard  
Fusionfire, I hadn't seen that interesting pdf about atomic hydrogen. I found a page in my McGraw / Hill Encyclopedia of Chemistry 2nd Edition, that gives104.2 kcal / mole at 25 degrees C which corresponds well with the value in your reference. Converting from joules it is a close match.


Hmmm, fascinating scan you provided. I'm going to buy that book when I get back from my holidays :)

It is clear that anyone who makes atomic hydrogen not only makes a powerful fuel/explosive/energy store, but also a very useful precursor chemical that can be used to produce all sorts of reactive products (reduce reactive metals, H2O2, produce hydrides, etc.)

Care to start a thread in a suitable sub-forum (I think technochemistry) about ideas to try to stabilise atomic hydrogen?

Would continuous irradiation with photons of the right frequency work if the goal is to keep the hydrogen atoms as positive hydrogen ions + free electrons?
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[*] posted on 27-1-2012 at 17:00


I bought the book from some guy at a swap meet for next to nothing, and I see from a quick search of the name you can still buy it for next to nothing ($3.97) It is a fairly large book, filled with all kinds of esoteric information. I found the information about the monatomic hydrogen after my first post on this thread.

I don't care to or feel qualified to start a thread about it, but if want to feel free.

The method used now to isolate the material is to use the atoms that have their electron and proton spins aligned so as to make it possible to keep the atoms aligned in a magnetic field. Since atoms sharing the same magnetic spin or alignment cannot share the same orbital they can't combine to form H2. I can't say I understand the Pauli exclusion principle but it is based on it. I think its like bar magnets repelling like poles. When the bar magnets flip over the H atoms can combine, with the protons sharing the two electrons that have their spins in opposite directions. The spinning electron generate a magnetic pole. Anyone with more understanding please explain it better.
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[*] posted on 27-1-2012 at 22:42


Quote: Originally posted by Mr. Wizard  
I bought the book from some guy at a swap meet for next to nothing, and I see from a quick search of the name you can still buy it for next to nothing ($3.97) It is a fairly large book, filled with all kinds of esoteric information. I found the information about the monatomic hydrogen after my first post on this thread.

I don't care to or feel qualified to start a thread about it, but if want to feel free.

The method used now to isolate the material is to use the atoms that have their electron and proton spins aligned so as to make it possible to keep the atoms aligned in a magnetic field. Since atoms sharing the same magnetic spin or alignment cannot share the same orbital they can't combine to form H2. I can't say I understand the Pauli exclusion principle but it is based on it. I think its like bar magnets repelling like poles. When the bar magnets flip over the H atoms can combine, with the protons sharing the two electrons that have their spins in opposite directions. The spinning electron generate a magnetic pole. Anyone with more understanding please explain it better.


OK I'll go start a thread in the technochemistry forum so we don't hijack this thread.
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[*] posted on 28-1-2012 at 19:09


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I think the strongest base is n-Butyllithium

eh... don't laugh...
..I might be wrong !!:P


No, tert-butyllithium is the strongest base available. Since n-butylpotassium can be made via the schlosser method I think n-butylcesium can be made too ?
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[*] posted on 30-1-2012 at 11:03


Hardest - Rhenium diboride >10 Mohs

Cyclopentyl cesium ought to be pretty basic. It's not really possible to name the most basic.

I think the strongest acids known presently may be the carborane superacids.



[Edited on 30-1-2012 by Zan Divine]
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[*] posted on 30-1-2012 at 12:29


Quote: Originally posted by Zan Divine  
I think the strongest acids known presently may be the carborane superacids.
[Edited on 30-1-2012 by Zan Divine]


Yeah, and the cool thing about it is, that they are also very gentle. Perfect H+ donor for making AP :D




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Formatik
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[*] posted on 4-2-2012 at 23:57


Superfluid helium (beyond "liquid helium") is one of the most extreme liquids known:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z6UJbwxBZI&NR

Here is an aluminium boat floating on sulfur hexafluoride (d= > 6g/L). The gas is completely harmless to inhale:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PJTq2xQiQ0
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[*] posted on 9-2-2012 at 13:37


Quote: Originally posted by nezza  
I thought lead azide has the fastest velocity of propagation for non-nuclear explosives. Does Octanitrocubane beat it ?.


Of course. Lead Azide is in the middle with his 5180 m/s @ 4.0 g/cc.

ONC : 10100m/s




Adrenaline filled experimentalism.
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[*] posted on 17-11-2012 at 17:14


Quote: Originally posted by Methyl.Magic  
Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I think the strongest base is n-Butyllithium

eh... don't laugh...
..I might be wrong !!:P


No, tert-butyllithium is the strongest base available. Since n-butylpotassium can be made via the schlosser method I think n-butylcesium can be made too ?


It is known that t-BuLi is stronger than n-BuLi. But, as already said, for these extreme compounds, measure of pKa is difficult, if not impossible. Maybe another way to measure the strength of these compounds could be their rate of deprotonating the solvent in which they are used (even if pKa is not a cinetic, but thermodynamic parameter...).
For example, it is said in wiki (and ref herein (even if not checked ^^ )) that :
- n-BuLi has a half-life of 153 hours in Et2O at 20°C ;
- whereas t-BuLi's is less than 30 minutes !!


Talking about BuLi and stuff, I was wondering : as n-BuLi seems to be 'easily' made in industry by :
n-BuX + Li(0) -> n-BuLi + LiX
with X = Cl or Br

couldn't n-BuNa or n-BuK (or others) be made using the same way ?
If so, how come these aren't produced ? Does anyone have an answer ?

[Edited on 18-11-2012 by tatapouette]
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[*] posted on 18-11-2012 at 01:05


Dicyanoacetylene hottest flame of any chemical.



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[*] posted on 18-11-2012 at 03:02


Sorry, last one was already written before. Titin, the largest protein known to man, with a molar mass of 2 million or 3 million.



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[*] posted on 18-11-2012 at 10:35



Only stable species are included in this list

Highest catenation observed with nitrogen atoms = 5 in the pentazenium cation (also known as pentanitrogen)

Highest thermal conductivity, He II

Metal with the highest specific heat, Lithium

Metal with the highest Young's modulus, Osmium

Most refractory material, Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC5), with a melting point of 4215 °C.

Highest coordination number in a planar species, decacoordinated molecular wheels anions, Ta©B10− and Nb©B10− (these are doubly aromatic! they have six delocalized pi electrons and another 10 delocalized sigma electrons)

Highest coordination number in a non-planar species, Thorium dimethylaminodiboranate, Th(H3BNMe2BH3)4. The thorium atom is coordinated to 15 hydrogens.

Highest specific impulse (isp), Metastable Helium





[Edited on 11/18/2012 by Zan Divine]




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[*] posted on 18-11-2012 at 11:31


Quote: Originally posted by simba  
Quote: Originally posted by paulr1234  
Most potent inorganic neurotoxin (I think Botulism is actually the most potent neurotoxin but given that it is a naturally occurring protein, I'm not sure where it should sit in a chemical taxonomy).


Botulinum is in fact the most acutely toxic substance known. Less than a kilo is enough to kill the whole planet.


I read just a pint is enough to kill the entire planet. Kind of scary that it can be found almost anywhere and rich white women get it injected into their faces. :D
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[*] posted on 25-1-2016 at 17:35


Quote: Originally posted by Formatik  
Superfluid helium (beyond "liquid helium") is one of the most extreme liquids known:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z6UJbwxBZI&NR

Here is an aluminium boat floating on sulfur hexafluoride (d= > 6g/L). The gas is completely harmless to inhale:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PJTq2xQiQ0


Hardly harmless to inhale. It is both an asphyxiant and a gas that is not easily cleared from the lungs.
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[*] posted on 26-1-2016 at 05:08


As asphyxiating as nitrogen and while typing this post I cleared my lungs of gas multiple times...
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[*] posted on 26-1-2016 at 08:11


Quote: Originally posted by Nitrous2000  

Hardly harmless to inhale. It is both an asphyxiant and a gas that is not easily cleared from the lungs.
This is a myth. Turbulence from air passing through the tiny tubes in your lungs would effectively mix the gases. They will not separate again because kinetic diffusion is far stronger than their gravitational buoyancy in each other.

Even if you took a gigantic breath of SF6 followed by normal breaths that did not fully purge it, low blood oxygen would cause you to feel out of breath and want to breathe harder, expelling it anyway.




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