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Author: Subject: Experiments with Cesium chloride?
Eddygp
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[*] posted on 28-4-2012 at 11:40


@blogfast, So we finish where we had started: a vacuum is needed, along with a very high temperature.



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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 28-4-2012 at 12:57


In a nutshell.



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alkalimetals
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 00:00


If I use a fridge compressor, reversed, can I obtain a vacuum below 10 mmHg? It's the maximum value described in the patent...
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 04:38


Quote: Originally posted by alkalimetals  
If I use a fridge compressor, reversed, can I obtain a vacuum below 10 mmHg?


Personally I doubt that. But I'm no expert on fridge compressors...




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alkalimetals
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 08:28


Thanks! But maybe it's sufficient a vacuum below 100 mmHg (I'm sure, in this case, fridge compressor works quite well...)

blogfast25, what do you think about?
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[*] posted on 29-4-2012 at 11:32


Try it. But fridge compressors aren't designed to be run as vac pumps, remain aware of that. Only use this idea when you've conclusively proved the fridge 'vac pump' can deliver and over prolonged periods of time too... :)



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[*] posted on 2-5-2020 at 22:14


I just want to throw out there that I was able to distill cesium metal with no inert atmosphere, at normal pressures without many problems other than a not so great yield. On my best run I was able to turn 20g of CsCl into 10g of Cesium metal. It's definitely not the most efficient way to do it and nowhere near to being the best way. But it can be done. An inert atmosphere and reduced pressure are not necessary. Only highly preferred to increase yields.
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[*] posted on 2-5-2020 at 22:16


Quote: Originally posted by BackyardScience2000  
I just want to throw out there that I was able to distill cesium metal with no inert atmosphere, at normal pressures without many problems other than a not so great yield. On my best run I was able to turn 20g of CsCl into 10g of Cesium metal. It's definitely not the most efficient way to do it and nowhere near to being the best way. But it can be done. An inert atmosphere and reduced pressure are not necessary. Only highly preferred to increase yields.

Welcome to SM.
Care to post photos if what you accomplished?
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[*] posted on 4-5-2020 at 07:38


If you have any chlorate or perchlorate Caesium chlorate and perchlorate are pretty insoluble and easy to precipitate. It can then be used for pyrotechnics and gives an interesting purplish coloured flame.



If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2020 at 08:35


Quote: Originally posted by nezza  
If you have any chlorate or perchlorate Caesium chlorate and perchlorate are pretty insoluble and easy to precipitate. It can then be used for pyrotechnics and gives an interesting purplish coloured flame.


Caesium perchlorate is sparingly soluble (1,974g/100ml at 25°C; 0,8g/100ml at 0°C). I don't know why K, Rb and Cs perchlorates are described as insoluble, while CaSO4 is described as sparingly soluble and have lower solubility at room temperature then these perchlorates. But yes, they have really low solubility which isn't common among perchlorates.

But caesium chlorate is soluble. I never read about any insoluble nitrate or chlorate.




If you are interested in aqueous inorganic chemistry look at https://colourchem.wordpress.com/main-page/

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[*] posted on 4-5-2020 at 09:49


I've bought some CsCl just only for demonstration of flame coloring, thanks for everyone for a lot of colorful experiments which are possible with Cs+
Quote: Originally posted by Bedlasky  
I never read about any insoluble nitrate or chlorate.

Although not truly insoluble, just only poorly soluble - basic bismuth nitrate should be the less soluble anorganic nitrate in water (less than 1g / 100 ml).




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