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Author: Subject: Sepparation Of copper chloride, brine and sodium acetate?
vampirexevipex
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[*] posted on 15-4-2012 at 10:39
Sepparation Of copper chloride, brine and sodium acetate?


Well today i was working with copper ll chloride dihydrate and accidentally i mixed it with a mixture of sodium acetate with some super saturaded sodium chloride (brine), and i was wondering... how do i get the copper chloride back? the solution is green btw.
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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 15-4-2012 at 11:04


Quote: Originally posted by vampirexevipex  
Well today i was working with copper ll chloride dihydrate and accidentally i mixed it with a mixture of sodium acetate with some super saturaded sodium chloride (brine), and i was wondering... how do i get the copper chloride back? the solution is green btw.


Mix it with some sodium hydroxide or carbonate and the copper will participate out of the solution. From the copper hydroxide/carbonatre it is easy to make copper chloride with some hydrochloric acid, but trying to get the copper chloride out from that solution is really hard.

Or maybe try to reduce it to copper(I) chloride what is almost insoluble in solutions and filter it out, than oxidize it back to copper(II).




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[*] posted on 15-4-2012 at 20:15


Copper(I) Chloride will dissolve in the brine solution due to the formation of a complex ion. Also, unless you have a vacuum filtration apparatus, you are going to have a hell of a time removing the brine solution from gelatinous precipitate of copper hydroxide or carbonate. I can't think of a realistic way to directly separate the copper chloride, but you could add a strip of aluminum metal which would react quickly in the brine solution to reduce the copper to its metallic form. You could then either heat the copper powder to convert it to oxide and dissolve the oxide in hydrochloric acid, or react the metal with a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid (in an ice bath). Depending on the amount in question, it may not even be worth it.
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[*] posted on 16-4-2012 at 05:04


Depending on how good a separation you need (and also the amounts of your salts) you could try adding some isopropyl alcohol and see whether it forms two separate layers. The sodium compounds are scarcely soluble in the alcohol, whereas CuCl2 is moderately soluble, so some of it would be extracted into the alcohol. Of course only *some* CuCl2 would pass over so you would need to repeat this multiple times; also getting IPA to form a separate layer from aqueous solution is not always easy. Possibly you'd be best off just starting over.



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