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Author: Subject: The Sciencemadness Book Project, Revived
Hexavalent
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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 13:54


I'll try and write as much as I can whenever I can and will post as RTF if you want on this thread.

Perhaps, at the end, a compilation of good YouTube channels would be nice . . .although perhaps if our book is still being read in 50 and 100 years time (if we're lucky) would they be completely obsolete?

What's your thoughts?





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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:02


I have a licensed copy of Publisher 2007 which can export to PDF; I'll convert your files if you post/U2U them...
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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:03


Brilliant, thanks Bob.

The first few bits of my piece as the .pub file are uploaded upthread.




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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:07


Nice job so far! (see attachment)

Attachment: lab safety publication.pdf (177kB)
This file has been downloaded 438 times

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Hexavalent
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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:09


Thanks a lot, Bob. When I've finished the entire document in Publisher, could you possibly convert it for me if I U2U it to you and then post the PDF version here? Thanks:)

Also, is this going to be an online/digital/e- book? Or are we, when it's finished, going to go to a book publisher and print hard copies for other amateur chemists?

[Edited on 8-5-2012 by Hexavalent]




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[*] posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:12


No problem! I don't have time to do anymore converting today, but I'll be happy to convert the finished publication.
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smile.gif posted on 8-5-2012 at 14:23


I love all the helping and collaborating!

Come on guys! Pitch in and let's finish this thing!

[Edited on 8-5-2012 by sargent1015]




The Home Chemist Book web page and PDF. Help if you want to make Home Chemist history! http://www.bromicacid.com/bookprogress.htm
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 12:56


I'd like to pitch in as well. I can't contribute pictures, not because I don't have a good camera, but because I have nothing to take pictures of:(

One suggestion, for "the elements" at the end, would it not make more sense to classify the elements by period, family or even block? Alphabetical order is a little bulky if you ask me. It's like if you made a keyboard by arranging all the letters in alphabetical order. Since this is a textbook for people who are acquainted with the periodic table (at least in part), it's a good idea to arrange elements the way we are all familiar with, by atomic number. There's enough info on the common nonmetals, but there is a pathetic amount of info on the transition elements.

The "compounds" section below the elements should either be eliminated completely or split into different categories (say organic solvents, gases, ionic salts, amorphous solids etc...)

Also, I feel like this book needs an appendix with good hard data, heat of formation data, radioactive half life data, vapour pressure curves, the colours of common acid-base indicators as well as redox indicators, melting points of a myriad of substances, the sky is the limit.




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Hexavalent
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 13:03


Nice idea, Yeti. I can attest to your suggestion on the 'tables of data', indeed that would be most useful; I also suggest a table of solubility for an array of ionic salts like Wikipedia has, in addition to, if anyone else thinks it's useful, perhaps a list of common apparatus and diagrams; it would help beginning amateur chemists when selecting, identifying and purchasing glassware and the rest of us that can't remember what a Dimroth or Graham condenser looks like when it's used in a publication for a procedure we'd like to try.



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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 15:39


Fantastic ideas, I have not even begun the element section. But, if you feel like you can contribute to the transition metals, I would sure appreciate it!

Remember, copyright free materials or 'with permission' if we are going to use it.

Thanks for all the help guys!




The Home Chemist Book web page and PDF. Help if you want to make Home Chemist history! http://www.bromicacid.com/bookprogress.htm
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 15:47


Also, nice signature Hexavalent :D

Anyone can and should post links to Bromic's web page so they can view and become inspired by the book.

Anyone with glassware and a good camera, you CAN help too!!




The Home Chemist Book web page and PDF. Help if you want to make Home Chemist history! http://www.bromicacid.com/bookprogress.htm
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 15:50


I'm not sure how well this project is going to turn out to be honest, seeing as the majority of this thread is a dialogue, but I'll make the following contribution:

http://ifile.it/26hck5s

Its a program called CutePDF which will allow you to "print" a file to .pdf. I find it particularly useful even with newer versions of office as "export to .pdf" can often re-adjust (i.e. fuck up) your formatting, which brings me to my second point; Even if everyone(/anyone at the current rate) submits a .pdf file on a specific topic and you tie them all together, the formatting between the files will vary and the whole collaboration will look messy. From what I can see theres no standardization in terms of font/size/margins/double spacing(?)/grammar/punctuation/chemdraw settings etc. etc., all of which will vary from member to member unless something is specifically requested.

It may be that I'm being anal about this, which I guess is understandable seeing as I'm part way through writing a thesis. But if we want to look professional as amateurs, we need uniformity. I guess that'll come down to the editor to format everything, or to give guidelines as to what is expected.

On the plus side, I may be able to help in a few weeks with some pictures of equipment/glassware. I'll need to fins a large enough black background - perhaps an A1/2/3 piece of black "sugar paper" will be appropriate. Until then I'm afraid I'm busy writing my SI.

EDIT: I've just read the .pdf on lab safety and I think I have some constructive critisisms. Firstly, I'm not really a fan of the "columned" writing style. If the book is not to be printed (i.e. instead made available as an ebook) then space is not at a premium and theres no need for it. If you are going to pursue the columned format, then I suggest a) you make a border between the columns (or a larger margin!), and b) JUSTIFY the text. This makes the left AND right sides square and makes for easier reading, especially in a columned format. I'm sure you can pick out the right button for it (it looks like "center" but all the "lines" are the same length); alternatively you can use the shortcut ctrl+j . I actually didnt read all of the content because it was quite strainuous to pay attention to. Maybe a "generic resistance" chart could be created for the common types of disposable glove and common classes of chemicals - or even a reference to an appendix would be good.

[Edited on 10-5-2012 by DJF90]
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 16:23


Ok, so I've just been browsing some old files and I found the following. Whilst not strictly chemistry, they were vital stepping stones to getting to where I am now, and were written by myself as revision notes before A2 exams. This is quite a few years ago now, but it may help some of the younger members get a head start on some key skills. Bear in mind that whilst these were intended as revision notes, they were written to be comprehensive, requireing little outside knowledge aside from what is contained, and some may even find them great for LEARNING from, as opposed to a refresher. I actually circulated these round my classes before the examination period, and the feedback from my peers was excellent. There were even suggestions of publishing them, so I guess this is what I am doing now, on the WWW.

Enjoy:


Attachment: A-Level Mathematics.docx (248kB)
This file has been downloaded 462 times

Attachment: A-level_Physics.docx (245kB)
This file has been downloaded 473 times

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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 16:24


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
I'm not sure how well this project is going to turn out to be honest, seeing as the majority of this thread is a dialogue, but I'll make the following contribution:

http://ifile.it/26hck5s

Its a program called CutePDF which will allow you to "print" a file to .pdf. I find it particularly useful even with newer versions of office as "export to .pdf" can often re-adjust (i.e. fuck up) your formatting, which brings me to my second point; Even if everyone(/anyone at the current rate) submits a .pdf file on a specific topic and you tie them all together, the formatting between the files will vary and the whole collaboration will look messy. From what I can see theres no standardization in terms of font/size/margins/double spacing(?)/grammar/punctuation/chemdraw settings etc. etc., all of which will vary from member to member unless something is specifically requested.

It may be that I'm being anal about this, which I guess is understandable seeing as I'm part way through writing a thesis. But if we want to look professional as amateurs, we need uniformity. I guess that'll come down to the editor to format everything, or to give guidelines as to what is expected.

On the plus side, I may be able to help in a few weeks with some pictures of equipment/glassware. I'll need to fins a large enough black background - perhaps an A1/2/3 piece of black "sugar paper" will be appropriate. Until then I'm afraid I'm busy writing my SI.

[Edited on 10-5-2012 by DJF90]


Yeah, I've just started officially working on the project and there is much to do. So do not worry, as the updates come in, there will be much improvement to each section. It is currently a work in progress and still needs a lot of attention to the big picture before I will ever worry about 'font, spacing, etc.'

What it comes down to is the amount of time I have to work through the entire book, front to back, and the amount of work I put into each of the sections, assuming I know a far deal about such topics.

Fortunately, there are other members out there that will donate sections to the book (Hexavalent being the safety contributor) which will make my life much easier.

No matter what it is that you have, I will attempt to incorporate it into the book.




The Home Chemist Book web page and PDF. Help if you want to make Home Chemist history! http://www.bromicacid.com/bookprogress.htm
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 19:56


I find it ironic that the "safety contributor" is an inexperienced 13 year old schoolkid. No offence to him, and he's very well versed for his age, but I just feel its kind of inappopriate almost. Theres a saying I heard at work the other day and I think it deserves mention here; "You never put out your own fires". Food for thought, most definately. At work we have lab notebooks with integrated COSHH and risk assessment. Its fairly streamlined and not too tedious, and sometimes you find out stuff you may not have known before. Just the other day a colleague was making IBX and he told me that the Oxone (potassium monopersulfate) is a sensitizer. I personally didn't know that, and its kind of worrying that this stuff if freely used by the general public to sanitise pools and spas, most likely without the appropriate protection in place.
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[*] posted on 9-5-2012 at 20:55


The book is for the home chemist, never has it been described as the 'book of everything Chemistry related'. Therefore, every chapter is prefaced by Bromic's warning:

"By reading further you agree not to hold the authors of this document responsible for any injuries/fatalities that may occur from attempting to make any of the products or following any of the procedures that are outlined within. Chemistry inherently possesses a degree of danger and you must understand this, wear gloves and more if the situation calls for it, your safety is in your own hands, not mine!"

Also, my own contribution: "Research a thousand times before you run a reaction and you still have to be prepared for the unexpected." (Next update, to be posted soon)

Knowing what you are doing is important, but there is no book out there that will completely prepare you for all the unknowns in every situation.




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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 09:47


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
I find it ironic that the "safety contributor" is an inexperienced 13 year old schoolkid. No offence to him, and he's very well versed for his age, but I just feel its kind of inappopriate almost.


I appreciate your input, but I have to disagree.

I am 14 at present, have never had any major lab accidents and when minor things do happen, they have virtually no effect due to my extensive safety procedures. I have researched a lot into safety and always background check any compound I use in my experiments.

Everything I described in this document I take very seriously myself, and, this, combined with my extensive viewing of safety videos on YouTube (made by professional institutions and companies) and reading professional university laboratory manuals and more I feel that I am more than capable of the job.

Again, I appreciate your opinion but this is one situation where I'll have to disagree.

(Also, not to cause any arguments, but please stop seeing young amateur chemist age as a sign of incompetence. If you did not know my age, I am certain that your response would have been different.)


[Edited on 10-5-2012 by Hexavalent]




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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 11:21


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
I am 14 at present, have never had any major lab accidents and when minor things do happen, they have virtually no effect due to my extensive safety procedures. I have researched a lot into safety and always background check any compound I use in my experiments.


Never having any major lab accidents may also mean that you've never run a reaction which has the potential of getting out of hand. Researching is something that every chemist MUST do in order to get anything done, whether amateur or experienced. The only people who do not thoroughly research the topic are k3W15, and they end up injuring themselves.

Even truly experienced chemists cannot say that they handle emergency situations correctly 100% of the time. When serious accidents happen, we all become different people because we cannot think rationally when in danger.




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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 12:59


I have some photos of glassware ready, just my laptop charger's just died and the old PC I'm writing this on just ain't good enough to handle and upload the images.

I have images of;

Beakers
Erlenmeyers
RBFs
Volumetric glassware
Buchner setups
Distillation equipment
Fractionating, refluxing and more distillation stuff
Porcelain stuff
Misc. labware, e.g. stir rods, watch glasses, petri dishes, chromatography tanks, etc.
Different tubes
Funnels
Thermometers




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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 13:03


Excellent. Just send them via my email so the image quality is not reduced.

As always, keep the submissions coming!




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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 13:08


Will do sargent (as soon as I get the bloody laptop sorted!):), I have taken them on a black background as requested . . .the quality for some of the images isn't amazing, but they serve their purpose and it's clear what they are.



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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 13:15


Quote:
Also, not to cause any arguments, but please stop seeing young amateur chemist age as a sign of incompetence. If you did not know my age, I am certain that your response would have been different.


My point was not that you are incompetent, but that you are inexperienced. As Sargent says, "Even truly experienced chemists cannot say that they handle emergency situations correctly 100% of the time". This is what I meant by the phrase "You never put out your own fires". I recall hearing of a recent incident where someone had a t-BuLi fire, and within seconds the D.Phils in the group had blasted it out with extinguishers, before the guy with the syringe had even responded to the situation. He just froze up, like most people do in an emergency.

I remember having to deal with a (non-chemistry related) emergency a year or two back and I was the same, I just didnt know what to do. When you're caught off guard like that I dont think any amount of preparation can help you. My point about you being an inexperienced chemist is not a derogatory one; it just means that you haven't had the opportunity to get in the lab and do some reactions that are a little less tame than aqueous test tube chemistry or basic organic synthesis. Experience comes with time. The one thing I dont want you to do is feel you have to rush to prove yourself, not to me or anyone else. Getting ahead of yourself is how some accidents happen. Get a good grip on the basics and the rest will follow.


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[*] posted on 10-5-2012 at 13:23


Thankyou, DJF90, for the clarification. I do not wish to sound too full of myself, but I believe that I do know 'the basics'; I have had the opportunity to run some reactions that could very easily have ended very badly - the Haloform reaction and the runaway that can occur with it is just one example. The very-small-scale-synthesis of TATP is another such example.


Back on topic, I shall upload the photos here for everyone to see as well as emailing them to the editor to ensure highest quality if they are used in the book.






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[*] posted on 11-5-2012 at 07:36


An example of one of the photos;

BILD0321.JPG - 137kB

[Edited on 11-5-2012 by Hexavalent]




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[*] posted on 11-5-2012 at 11:08


Finally, something I can really contribute to! I can't provide pictures, but I consider myself a good enough writer to explain synthesis or other procedures. Let me know if you want my help. It's OK if you feel that 2 writers are good enough, I just like this idea and think I can help. :)
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