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Author: Subject: Obtaining Alkali Metals
borrowedlawyer
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[*] posted on 5-9-2012 at 23:45
Obtaining Alkali Metals


Hello all,

I am trying to locate some sodium metal in Australia. Does anyone know where to buy it?

If it is too hard to acquire, I am considering making it, but it seems dangerous as I have only just started.

Before you comment Hexavalent, I have used the search feature. (BTW thanks for telling me about it, I did not even see it lol)

Thank You
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Hexavalent
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 06:52


You can get lithium from batteries, but preparing alkali metals is not the place for a beginner to start and also probably not for them to handle.

[Edited on 6-9-2012 by Hexavalent]




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Doc B
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 07:56


It can be purchased but being a restricted chemical you would need to complete an End User Declaration (EUD) stating why you were purchasing it along with copies of you photo ID (eg; drivers license)
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triplepoint
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 09:27


FWIW, I also think a beginner is better off starting with some of the many materials that are less hazardous and more forgiving. There are all kinds of issues that can come up that a beginner would not expect. Build up some experience and a knowledge base, then move on to sodium.
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marko
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 13:00


I had a car with sodium filled exhaust valves.. not sure how much would be in a valve, but... suppose that would be one way to get a little bit.
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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 14:31


Quote: Originally posted by borrowedlawyer  
Hello all,

I am trying to locate some sodium metal in Australia. Does anyone know where to buy it?

If it is too hard to acquire, I am considering making it, but it seems dangerous as I have only just started.

Before you comment Hexavalent, I have used the search feature. (BTW thanks for telling me about it, I did not even see it lol)

Thank You


You could try galliumsource.com I quickly checked their website and it looks like they may perhaps ship to AU. The shipping rates might be ridiculous though. Sodium isn't all that interesting as a reagent either... Is there a particular application you need it for?

I bought some not long ago and put a few bits into some water to show a friend who never saw it before, but it is far too expensive to do that very often. I save it for solvent drying and whatnot.

Might as well try getting lithium from batteries and play around with that (already quite damned expensive) if you really want to experiment with reactive metals.
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Lambda-Eyde
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 14:48


Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
Sodium isn't all that interesting as a reagent either...

Come again? Heard of the Birch reduction, Bouveault-Blanc reduction or perhaps the Clemmensen reduction? Or its widespread use in organometallic chemistry? The use of metallic sodium as a reagent opens for many interesting reactions not otherwise possible, don't underestimate it. It's more to those soft, shiny lumps than throwing them into water...




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elementcollector1
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 15:10


That and drying numerous solvents without a hitch, one of the biggest uses for the lower alkali's.



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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 6-9-2012 at 15:14


Quote: Originally posted by Lambda-Eyde  
Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
Sodium isn't all that interesting as a reagent either...

Come again? Heard of the Birch reduction, Bouveault-Blanc reduction or perhaps the Clemmensen reduction? Or its widespread use in organometallic chemistry? The use of metallic sodium as a reagent opens for many interesting reactions not otherwise possible, don't underestimate it. It's more to those soft, shiny lumps than throwing them into water...


Oh for sure it's amazing stuff!

But since this person mentioned they are only starting out I assumed they wanted to experiment with it to explore alkali metal properties and not perform Bouveault-Blanc reductions and the like yet. I may be wrong though!

In any case, lithium could be of interest, and easier/cheaper to get if they just want to explore alkali metals.

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borrowedlawyer
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[*] posted on 7-9-2012 at 01:58


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
You can get lithium from batteries, but preparing alkali metals is not the place for a beginner to start and also probably not for them to handle.

[Edited on 6-9-2012 by Hexavalent]

Thanks about the lithium from batteries tip, I watched nurdrage's video on how to get it. Now I have a sample of lithium in mineral oil!

[Edited on 7-9-2012 by borrowedlawyer]
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