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Author: Subject: Best chemical for cleaning glasses?
BlazeBall
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[*] posted on 11-10-2012 at 15:20
Best chemical for cleaning glasses?


These new glasses I have seem to be impossible to clean, I have been led to believe this is because of the anti-reflective coating on them. Detergent sprays sold at the opticians are useless, I've also tried methylated spirits, this solvent works better but is still not perfect, the only way I can get a perfect clean to them is cleaning them with a dry tissue for about 15 minutes to get rid of every bit of grease, but this is not a long term solution because it damages the glasses, does anyone have any ideas?
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UnintentionalChaos
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[*] posted on 11-10-2012 at 15:33


soap.



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[*] posted on 11-10-2012 at 17:50


Soap such as Ivory liquid rinsed with lots of water, or Bausch & Lomb Sight Savers. Both work well.




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CHRIS25
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[*] posted on 12-10-2012 at 02:08


Have you tried a gentle boiling in sodium carbonate solution, a very gentle boiling that is. Then scrub with scotchbrite gently in and out of boiling water?



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[*] posted on 12-10-2012 at 17:00


For goodness sakes do not try the idiotic suggestion of the last poster! I assume your lenses are plastic, but the same applies if glass. One problem with a low reflection coating is that one tends to be a bit more critical for that very reason – everything shows up more. I’d agree with mild detergent liquid soap in about 70% isopropyl alcohol, a mixture I’ve used for years. Soap, water and the IPA do a great job on grease and oil, and a bit of water helps with inorganics such as NaCl from sweat etc. Use tissue or a lens cloth gently to finalize, and if still smears are seen, use distilled water. I always used mild detergent in distilled water on astronomic mirrors with enhanced Al with a special coating, followed by distilled water then alcohol wash.
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Pyro
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[*] posted on 13-10-2012 at 04:27


give them to your local optician to clean. they should do it for free or very cheaply




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[*] posted on 13-10-2012 at 12:49


It seems that a few of us have glasses. A trait, caused by looking too much at books?:)



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[*] posted on 13-10-2012 at 12:53


The standard for many years in organic labs was a bath of H2SO4/picric acid, or H2SO4/*dichromate. Then OSHA got involved. I'm almost certain many seasoned professionals who worked at big pharmaceutical company labs can attest to these baths.
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[*] posted on 13-10-2012 at 13:23


The best for cleaning optical glass is soap + water. The second best is a buckskin or deerskin. And the third is any type of small mol weight alcohol like MeOH, EtOH, PrOH.

The important is that NEVER clean coated optical glass with tissue, because it with remove the coating layer. Old T and UV coated optics were sometimes cleaned by kids that way to remove the reflective coating to use the optics for near UV photography.




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[*] posted on 19-10-2012 at 07:34


I had ONE pair of glasses coated with an anti-reflective layer. The layer is very easy to scratch, remove (peel off) with chemicals, and hard to clean. Thus I never got another pair. I would be very careful in cleaning, as mine were very easy to scratch, and once the coating was scratched, it got weaker and weaker, until it peeled off like an onion skin in places.
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[*] posted on 21-10-2012 at 10:48


i also have a pair of glasses with the anti-reflective coating. it appears that using liquid hand soap causes them to fog up, terribly; but using bar soap is much better.

my washing procedure is specific:

first, wash my hands with the soap and rinse;
with wet fingertips, take up some of the soap until they're slippery;
moisten the glasses with water;
gently brush the surfaces with the slippery fingertips;
rinse the glasses in water;
pad dry (do not rub), with lint-free cloth.
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[*] posted on 26-10-2012 at 18:48


isopropyl alcohol + diethyl ether
That is a good mix for cleaning lenses
I know that because i use that solution for cleaning microscopes lenses.

Good luck :cool:
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[*] posted on 28-10-2012 at 14:15


piranha H2SO4+30%H2O2 4:1 or so


bases dissolve glass, so they slightly destroy things with high surface area.

piranha will destroy and remove most organics and also make the glass more hydrophilic.





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[*] posted on 28-10-2012 at 14:18


Quote: Originally posted by niertap  
piranha H2SO4+30%H2O2 4:1 or so


bases dissolve glass, so they slightly destroy things with high surface area.

piranha will destroy and remove most organics and also make the glass more hydrophilic.



isnt it going to damage the plastic around the glasses?
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[*] posted on 28-10-2012 at 14:28


EtOH+H2O+acetone



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[*] posted on 14-11-2012 at 02:47


Quote: Originally posted by niertap  
piranha H2SO4+30%H2O2 4:1 or so


bases dissolve glass, so they slightly destroy things with high surface area.

piranha will destroy and remove most organics and also make the glass more hydrophilic.



This is going to destroy your ar-coating, which you may one day be happy to have. We have a piranha bath here (also called caroic acid) and it is kept under temperature (80°C if I remeber correctly..too lazy to check)

As eddygp says, alcohol (no matter if its ipa or etOH),water,acetone is a fine mixture to clean anything.
Do you happen to have an ultrasonic cleaner?


[Edited on 14-11-2012 by Conrad]
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[*] posted on 14-11-2012 at 09:40


ARE YOU ALL FUCKING INSANE‽

The answer is <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Properties_of_water" target="_blank">oxidane</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />. Yes, simply hot water.

Go to the sink. Turn the hot tap on. Wait for it to get as hot as it will. Hold lenses under tap for about 30 seconds per side per lens with the water hitting the lens perpendicularly. Blot dry (do not wipe) with softest lint-free cloth you can find. Water hardness is irrelevant, as long as you blot dry.

I have coated <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polycarbonate" target="_blank">polycarbonate</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> lenses. I think I'm on my third pair of the coated ones&ndash;so I actually know what I'm talking about, unlike most of these twats. I've also worn glasses since I was little. I tend to break the frames by getting hit in the face with heavy or stationary objects (don't ask), but I've never had an issue with the lens coating.

I see that you're from the UK, and I'm not sure how it is there, but in the US (or at least Minnesota) you can't get actual glass lenses if you're under 21 years of age. Over 21, polycarbonate is standard anyway. Apparently the government thinks 18 is <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_majority" target="_blank">old enough</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> to vote, be <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscription" target="_blank">drafted</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" /> to die for my country, etc., but not to choose glass lenses on the remote chance that they shatter into cornea-piercing glass shrapnel.

And, of course, I'll leave you with the obligatory educational Wikipedia article on <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-reflective_coating" target="_blank">anti-reflective coatings</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png"> for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optics" target="_blank">optics</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />.

[Edited on 7/9/13 by bfesser]




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tetrahedron
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[*] posted on 14-11-2012 at 10:32


hmm how do you make sure the glasses have been cleaned well, while you're holding and therefore not wearing them?
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[*] posted on 14-11-2012 at 11:39


I'm <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myopia" target="_blank">nearsighted</a> <img src="../scipics/_wiki.png" />.

[Edited on 7/9/13 by bfesser]




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[*] posted on 16-11-2012 at 17:08


I've worn glasses since I was 9 months old and I'm now 71 and the best cleaner I've ever used is a 50/50 mix of Etoh & NH4OH.



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