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Author: Subject: Chemical Etching
Vargouille
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[*] posted on 22-1-2013 at 15:43


It could be that the release of Gibb's free energy follows the pattern you ascribe, but that's a separate series of calculations that I didn't bother to do. I felt the enthalpy calculations would be sufficient.

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uzaymaymunu
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[*] posted on 22-1-2013 at 16:54



Your answer "Lithium is more reducing than sodium, potassium or ceasium, and give more energy when reacted with water for instence then ceasium, First because its atomic mass is much less then ceasium. And the energy liberated is similar but one mole of ceasium weigh much more. Secondly lithium take more starting energy fore the reaction then ceasium, but release much more after the reaction"

İ said "Cs or K is more reactive than Li but have less potential than li, why?" Not: "more exothermic than sth"

So your answer is not about that question. [MEKP is much more reactive than acetone. But acetone gives more energy than mekp when combustion.]
And i will say again learn chemistry. Do you have any book except brauer's handbook? İf answer is yes ok read it.
And maybe this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactivity_(chemistry)

And i may have made simple mistakes. When you after going to university (i hope you will) you will understand how can a person do simple mistakes especially having more profession about something.

(Thank you for calculations Vargouille)
I apogilize to everyone. And this topic is over to me.




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plante1999
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[*] posted on 22-1-2013 at 17:04


Quote: Originally posted by uzaymaymunu  


And i will say again learn chemistry. Do you have any book except brauer's handbook? İf answer is yes ok read it.
And maybe this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactivity_(chemistry)



I have a collection of 2000 chemistry book, most of them are longer than 1000 pages. I will continue to learn chemistry, don't worry. I know what is reactivity, the more energy a reaction give when the reaction start (and not end) will give a more violent reaction. The inverse will make very exothermic reaction, without much violence.




I never asked for this.
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Vargouille
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[*] posted on 22-1-2013 at 17:28


Cesium and potassium are more reactive than lithium because of their sizes. The ionization energy of an atom exists because there is an attractive force between the positively charged nucleus and the negatively charged electron. When there are multiple electrons in the electron cloud, they tend to lessen the attractive effect of the nucleus, an effect called "shielding". This is because of the repulsive effect that particles of the same sign exhibit. Inner electron shells shield more strongly, lessening the attraction between the nucleus and the valence electrons even more. Cesium has more of the inner electron shells than lithium, thus it gives up an electron more easily.

Lithium has a lower redox potential, however, because of the behavior of both lithium and the lithium ion. While lithium is less reactive than cesium, it is also more polar, so more water molecules will bond to it. This offsets the lowered reactivity of the lithium atom, resulting in a lower redox potential than cesium, because the combination of the energy released by the lithium upon oxidation and upon its hydration outweighs that of cesium. This applies because the redox potentials are determined in aqueous solution.
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