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Author: Subject: Aluminum chloride and wound bleeding
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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 12:44
Aluminum chloride and wound bleeding


This is a basic inquiry. I'm wondering what is it in an aluminum chlroide solution 20-30% that, say if it was applied to a small bleeding cut, makes it stop bleeding immediately?

[Edited on 22-7-2004 by chemoleo]
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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 15:11


Please see this thread.

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=2315


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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 16:58


No we don't. But regardless, I'm quite interested in aluminum chloride myself: I have a deodorant that contains about 20% aluminum chloride that according to my experiments stops sweating for about 11 days. How does it work?



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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 17:14


My deodorant contains Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY 17.6% w/w And according to my chemistry book this compound has been phased out of use as an anti perspirant due to cancer concerns.

Silver nitrate also quickly cauterizes, especially if applied as a powder.




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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 18:07


My experiences in the paper industry included using Al(NO3)3 on an experimental basis to clarify some waste water. IIRC the trivalent ions are effective coagulants for negatively charged particles. Perhaps that is what is in blood.



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[*] posted on 20-7-2004 at 18:46


I came across these two thoughts of the mechanism of aluminum chloride as a coagulant. One is that it denatures blood and tissue proteins, which then agglutinate and form plugs that occlude the capillary orifices. The other is that it causes cause a transient ischemia, shrinking the tissue. Here the exact mechanism is poorly understood, but histological observation suggests that Aluminum may migrate into the connective tissue and cause swelling of collagen fibers, which exerts pressure on the capillaries. This effectively reduces the blood supply to the area.
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[*] posted on 21-7-2004 at 18:09


I guess I will have to have a look tomorrow or sometimes this/next week to find out whether aluminium chloride really does denature proteins...
It's unfortunately not quite a trivial experiment, as it requires rigorous pH control (which may cause precipitiation of hydroxide salts).
I am thinking of running a quick fluorescence assay, where aluminium chloride is added to a random protein (homogenous), while the fluorescence change at 300 nm is observed (corresponding to tryptophan). Then the same thing should be done, I guess, with 8M urea or guanidinium hydrochloride, to see whether the fluorescence change is different or the same.
If it is the same, I guess we have a confirmation indeed that Al3+ does denature proteins (as urea/GdnHCl does)...
I would be surprised though.... else why would all the biophysicists not use Al3+ instead of the commonly used Gdn HCl/SCN or urea?
Or conversely, why is urea not used instead (for cauterising wounds), which is definitely compatible with mammalian cells? I somehow think the mechanism is not down to denaturation....

[Edited on 22-7-2004 by chemoleo]




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