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Author: Subject: FePO4 blue !?
platedish29
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 10:29


Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  
Quote: Originally posted by platedish29  
EDIT 2: yea ammonium iron phosphate is really grey-green. But when it was first prepared starting through iron hydroxide, thats green in color, and phosphoric acid, it first dissolved completely and turn red-brown? Then uppon addition of ammonium hydroxide it turned to the final color.

[Edited on 19-3-2013 by platedish29]


Take us through what you did precisely?


Uh?! what? I successfully reproduced the experiment for a green variety of the phosphate, showed for that procedures. What I got after filtering indicates that the original poster have gone tricky in his affairs, and that the blue variety must be more of a valuable than we may dink + I added absolutely extra ammnonia so it may enhance the facts about stoichometry mentioned earlier. The solution smells ammonia but it still managed to yield the very green product at the same time. Interesting is also the gelly green hydroxide changing into a brown colloidal suspension in the rist acid addition showed how iron behaves in this particular situation...
nevethless practically showed everything about iron there is to be shown.
Thanks.
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 16:18


Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  

There are plenty of oxidisers that will oxidise Fe(II) to Fe(III) but few leave no trace.


Can Ca(ClO)2 do it cleanly ?




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platedish29
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 16:41


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  

There are plenty of oxidisers that will oxidise Fe(II) to Fe(III) but few leave no trace.


Can Ca(ClO)2 do it cleanly ?


Do you mean calcium hypochlorite? I know calcium when added to iron III sulphate switches its colors from brown to red, an indicative it would somehow contribute iron III formation. Is it commonly believed Fe3+ ions would survive alone in the solution? I mean, not sticking to something else?
Fe(HOH)3 + Fe(HOH)3 + HCl + H2O --> Fe2(OH)(HOH)5Cl + H2OH+

*****Dear rstar,
not into the assurance (that posts that it is you the owner) producing it too are clearly demeriting...but if I posed a photo of them in the internet? I kicked a weird glitter which is so beautiful!
:cool:


[Edited on 20-3-2013 by platedish29]
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 18:01


Quote: Originally posted by platedish29  


Do you mean calcium hypochlorite? I know calcium when added to iron III sulphate switches its colors from brown to red, an indicative it would somehow contribute iron III formation. Is it commonly believed Fe3+ ions would survive alone in the solution? I mean, not sticking to something else?
Fe(HOH)3 + Fe(HOH)3 + HCl + H2O --> Fe2(OH)(HOH)5Cl + H2OH+

*****Dear rstar,
not into the assurance posts that its you the owner producing it too are clearly demeriting if I posed a photo of them in the internet? I kicked weird glitter which is so beautiful!
:cool:


This post is unacceptable.

Fe(OH)3, not Fe(HOH)3.

"Fe2(OH)(HOH)5Cl" and "H2OH" do not exist.

Compounds do not react with themselves, just put "2 Fe(OH)3" if that's what you meant.

Calcium ions, when added to iron sulfate, precipitate out *white* calcium sulfate, leaving an iron salt (likely also in the +3 oxidation state).

As for just Fe ions, not technically true, even if you used stoichiometry: some small amount of CaSO4 does dissolve in water.

As for the last paragraph... What? Are you high or something? Or just trolling?




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platedish29
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 18:28


Quote: Originally posted by elementcollector1  
Quote: Originally posted by platedish29  


Do you mean calcium hypochlorite? I know calcium when added to iron III sulphate switches its colors from brown to red, an indicative it would somehow contribute iron III formation. Is it commonly believed Fe3+ ions would survive alone in the solution? I mean, not sticking to something else?
Fe(HOH)3 + Fe(HOH)3 + HCl + H2O --> Fe2(OH)(HOH)5Cl + H2OH+

*****Dear rstar,
not into the assurance posts that its you the owner producing it too are clearly demeriting if I posed a photo of them in the internet? I kicked weird glitter which is so beautiful!
:cool:


This post is unacceptable.

Fe(OH)3, not Fe(HOH)3.

"Fe2(OH)(HOH)5Cl" and "H2OH" do not exist.

Compounds do not react with themselves, just put "2 Fe(OH)3" if that's what you meant.

Calcium ions, when added to iron sulfate, precipitate out *white* calcium sulfate, leaving an iron salt (likely also in the +3 oxidation state).

As for just Fe ions, not technically true, even if you used stoichiometry: some small amount of CaSO4 does dissolve in water.

As for the last paragraph... What? Are you high or something? Or just trolling?


Nope sier!
I just want to post a photo of the glitter I hade made and steal the credits for the idea.
Sorry for that phrase it SOUNDS confusing, or I just have a very colloquial english!

yeah, Fe(HOH)3 Should be Fe(OH2)6(3+) or Fe(OH2)4(3+) not sure, sorry, just missed the notations.

[Edited on 20-3-2013 by platedish29]
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 18:52


Trying to understand here: You made ferric ammonium phosphate, or some other compound, and it was glittery. You want to sell this compound, or otherwise "steal the idea".
...I still don't get it.
Oh, you were referring to the hydrated Fe(H2O)x +3 ions. I thought you were referring to Fe(OH)3, the compound. My bad.




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rstar
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[*] posted on 19-3-2013 at 21:14


@platedish : LOL

FeCl2 + Ca(ClO)2 = ?




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[*] posted on 20-3-2013 at 04:12


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
@platedish : LOL

FeCl2 + Ca(ClO)2 = ?


Calcium hypochlorite will oxidise Fe(II) very easily but you end up with an almost inseparable mixture of FeCl3 and CaCl2: fairly useless.




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platedish29
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[*] posted on 20-3-2013 at 12:09


The cause of coloration was probably just caged iron hydroxides. High heat makes them dehydrate into a bid deal of orange/ black/ brown mass.
How's going dessication of your blue stuff rstar?
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[*] posted on 21-3-2013 at 00:44


Ok, going to heat up that blue stuff today and post the results in this space . :)

[

]

[Edited on 21-3-2013 by rstar]




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[*] posted on 21-3-2013 at 01:06


I guess FeCl2 can be easily oxidized to FeCl3 by KMnO4, but there will be a problem of separating the Mn++ ions



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[*] posted on 21-3-2013 at 09:08


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I guess FeCl2 can be easily oxidized to FeCl3 by KMnO4, but there will be a problem of separating the Mn++ ions


Yes. That's why H2O2, HNO3 or Cl2 are preferred: they leave no cations that would have to be separated from the Fe3+ cations, a difficult task.




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[*] posted on 22-3-2013 at 09:18


Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  
Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
I guess FeCl2 can be easily oxidized to FeCl3 by KMnO4, but there will be a problem of separating the Mn++ ions


Yes. That's why H2O2, HNO3 or Cl2 are preferred: they leave no cations that would have to be separated from the Fe3+ cations, a difficult task.


HNO3 ? conc or dilute ? and can you give me the equation ?




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[*] posted on 22-3-2013 at 10:07


Quote: Originally posted by rstar  
HNO3 ? conc or dilute ? and can you give me the equation ?


Oxidation ‘half-reaction’:

Fe2+ === > Fe3+ + e-

Reduction (‘half-reaction’):

HNO3 + 3 H+ + 3 e- === > NO + 2 H2O

(Note: NO will oxidise spontaneously to NO2 when exposed to air oxygen [NO+ ½ O2 === > NO2], these are the dangerously brown toxic fumes you would observe)

To balance the electrons:

3 Fe2+ + HNO3 + 3 H+ === > 3 Fe3+ + NO + 2 H2O

To obtain charge neutrality:

3 FeCl2 + HNO3 + 3 HCl === > 3 FeCl3 + NO + 2 H2O

Even 35 % HNO3 will do the trick. My experience is that the oxidation reaction seems to take place all at once, so you need quite a roomy container to avoid the reagent mix to boil over: both gas and heat are produced when the reaction takes place. BEWARE of the toxic NO2: do this outside (standing upwind) or under a fume hood. Cold mix the reagents in a very roomy beaker, then slowly heat while stirring constantly, until quite suddenly the reaction will proceed and much NO/NO2 will be released and the solution will heat up a lot too.

After successful reaction, simmer the solution for some time to eliminate all traces of NO. You now have a relatively pure solution of FeCl3, which depending on concentration will be yellow (very dilute) to reddish/brown (more concentrated).



[Edited on 22-3-2013 by blogfast25]




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