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Author: Subject: I just drank some ozonized water
Adas
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biggrin.gif posted on 8-4-2013 at 10:43
I just drank some ozonized water


Hello guys!

Since I have a HV source, I made a very simple ozone generator and tried ozonizing some water. It didn't work well, probably the temp. was too high or there was too much water (or both), but when I tried it with snow from refrigerator, pretty much ozone dissolved.

It was around 5ml of ice water total, and when it hit my tongue, it created very tiny bubbles of PURE OZONE! That feeling was similar to when you drink carbonated water, ozone tastes differently, though, and it left me with some tingling on my tongue. Very strange, I am quite amazed.

I don't know if it has any health benefits, but it makes a perfect mouthwash, for sure. :D




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Endimion17
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[*] posted on 8-4-2013 at 11:01


Keep doing it if you're into dying from upper digestive system ulcers, sores and bleeding. ;)
It has absolutely no health benefits and consuming ozone-related preparations, as well as intramuscular, subcutaneous and intravenuous injections is a known and recognized dangerous scam.
Ozone is a poison. Luckily for you, there wasn't much ozone in your "pure ozone". If it were, you wouldn't be typing this...




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Adas
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[*] posted on 8-4-2013 at 11:29


Okay I tried it once. :D Nothing could happen if you try once. But I am starting to get the impression that some of the bubbles was just CO2 from air, though there is just 0.05% CO2 in the air :| This didn't happen when I used more water with slightly higher temp. I might also try just bubbling air through ice-cold water.



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blogfast25
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[*] posted on 8-4-2013 at 11:32


Quote: Originally posted by Adas  
Okay I tried it once. :D Nothing could happen if you try once.


Are you going to try arsenic once too?

The bubbles were probably O2, the decay product of O3...




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[*] posted on 8-4-2013 at 13:05


If you really had pure ozone, then you would have seen a blue gas. Ozone has a clearly visible blue color. Colored gases can easily be observed if they are present in high concentration (e.g. Cl2, NO2, ONCl, ClO2) and ozone is not an exception to this. But in practical situations, the 'pure ozone' is at most a few tenths of percent of ozone and then you don't see anything of the gas.

Liquid ozone must be quite spectacular to see and is said to have a deep dark blue color, but I have never seen any of this.




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[*] posted on 8-4-2013 at 14:56


I have not seen ozone as a blue gas.
I suspect that ozonisers produce it at too low a level to see the blue colour of the gas.
But you can see the colour of ozone in a solution of liquid oxgen by passing oxygen through an ozoniser and condensing the exit gases.
Liquid oxygen is a light blue liquid, it becomes more blue as ozone condenses in the liquid. It also becomes a lot more reactive,

[Edited on 9-4-2013 by ScienceSquirrel]
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Adas
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[*] posted on 9-4-2013 at 06:58


It would be nice to connect an oxygen concentrator to O3 generator and condense the O3 with liquid N2 ;) It would be dangerous, though, because liquid O3 can explode.



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[*] posted on 9-4-2013 at 07:18


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
If you really had pure ozone, then you would have seen a blue gas. Ozone has a clearly visible blue color. Colored gases can easily be observed if they are present in high concentration (e.g. Cl2, NO2, ONCl, ClO2) and ozone is not an exception to this. But in practical situations, the 'pure ozone' is at most a few tenths of percent of ozone and then you don't see anything of the gas.

Liquid ozone must be quite spectacular to see and is said to have a deep dark blue color, but I have never seen any of this.


There is a picture of it in the 'pretty pictures' topic, taken from a guy who made it. It is indeed dark blue.
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[*] posted on 9-4-2013 at 09:04


Quote: Originally posted by simba  
There is a picture of it in the 'pretty pictures' topic, taken from a guy who made it. It is indeed dark blue.


I remember. It was not pure. It's was a solution.

Pure liquid ozone would probably be something very sensitive to even the slightest speck of dust and prone to detonation. When dealing with such substances, the people who first described it probably worked with special apparatus and tiny quantities. I seriously doubt anyone ever made even few mililitres of the pure stuff.




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