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Author: Subject: Cleaning glassware and other equipment
j_sum1
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[*] posted on 1-7-2021 at 22:31
Sparkling Test Tubes


I use a lot of these one way or another. And it is annoying when I grab a handful and they look kind of smeary.

Lie them flat in a container. (I used an ice cream container.) Sprinkle liberally with sodium percarbonate. Pour a jug of boiling water over the top. When the fizzing stops, extract and enjoy.

Probably an old trick given that percarbonate is used to sanitise beer bottles. Probably extends to other glassware as well.
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Herr Haber
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[*] posted on 2-7-2021 at 00:57


"Other equipment"

Whenever I finish an ammonia bottle I drop my comb inside with a little bit of water.

Swirling it around for 30 seconds gives better resulsts than a pressure washer.




The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words 'act upon' meant. - Ira Remsen
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j_sum1
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[*] posted on 8-1-2022 at 20:09
Barium sulfate residue



Barium sulfate
BaSO4 is notoriously insoluble. I like to recycle Ba salts when I can and then render the rest inert before disposing. This invariably results in a fine layer of the sulfate clinging to the glassware. Especially annoying on filtration equipment and it looks really unsightly.

Rinsing with hardware store grade hydrochloric acid with a wee bit of mechanical action seems to work well. It might take a couple of rinsings with the acid. A surprising amount reappeared when running water over apparently clean flasks.

I also managed to hydrolyse the nylon bristles on my new flask brush, so watch out for that one.
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MaeBorowski
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[*] posted on 20-1-2022 at 16:06


I found that boiling sulfuric acid destroys any crap including elemental carbon, sulfur, barium sulfate, and most polymers. Unfortunately for mad science, I haven't unnecessary diamond. This method is gentle for glass, cheap, fast, reusable, eco-friendly etc. so you can try it if the piranha sucked a little.
Remember about SO2 releasing!




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Crazy_Chemist
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[*] posted on 26-3-2022 at 21:52


I bought som chromium (tri)oxide to have to clean my glass, but I'v understand theat is really dangerous and carcinogenic?



Amateur chemist, just for fun!
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CycloRook
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[*] posted on 7-4-2022 at 06:32


What is a good cleaner/solvent for glassware. I've been do alot of grignard reactions recently and have had a few run away from me.

Acetone and acetic acid worked pretty well but both smell really bad.

Is there something I could soak my glassware in overnight that would clean/destroyed/dissolve everything.

Water based would be best that doesn't smell.
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