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Mephisto
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[*] posted on 15-5-2007 at 06:50


Quote:
Originally posted by S.C. Wack
I'm up to 90% of where Rhadon and Mephisto were with pdf quality years ago!


Oh come on, that's almost unlawful modest. I've seen your e-book, it's really perfectly made.

I am just curious how fast your scanner makes a 600 dpi b/w scan now. And how did you centre the page content? Some years ago, this was the most difficult part, because the earlier Finereader hadn't this manual crop function. Or did you use ScanKromsator to centre the page content?




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S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 15-5-2007 at 14:08


Well, I compared file sizes...It seems like I could lose a little more if I did some more experimentation, but I'm much busier now than I was 2+ years ago, I'm no longer ruled by my lower back problems. By fast I only mean at the same speed as 300 dpi with either of my scanners. The size of the scan both vertically and horizontally is adjusted for the size of the book with the scanner software, 7 seconds at that size.

So you're the person that downloaded it!...for me popularity is inversely proportional to the amount of effort made: my rapidshare links to my material die soon, while those who merely upload my books have lots of downloads. The Marianne Faithfull video that I looked for, found, and uploaded to youtube under this name is way more popular than everything that I made myself put together.

The key to getting the pages centered is getting the pages in the corner perfectly each time. Not the book, you have to physically take the page you want to scan and line it up. I hold the unscanned pages in one hand, scan, let go of the page and turn it by moving horizontally and catching it on the edge of the scanner. This was particularly easy for this book because of the construction. It lies as flat when opened as any book that I've ever seen, with the center of the book at the binding well-exposed, without a big hump rising up out from the center. So I didn't really have to press down much with the other hand.

Lining up the page also keeps page straightening in Finereader to a minimum. Finereader moves the pages a bit when straightening. I guess not all bundled software is bad: I used the Photoshop Elements that came with the Canon to center a few stray pages with the drag tool, and batch rename. And I've heard of some scanners coming with Finereader.

The pages were cropped to minimum canvas size and then resized after looking them over. As usual, a few pages with print out to the edges had to be done separately, from the straightened scans. I did take some care and more time than usual on this one.

[Edited on 15-5-2007 by S.C. Wack]
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Mephisto
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[*] posted on 17-5-2007 at 09:15


Quote:
Originally posted by S.C. Wack
...for me popularity is inversely proportional to the amount of effort made: my rapidshare links to my material die soon, while those who merely upload my books have lots of downloads. The Marianne Faithfull video that I looked for, found, and uploaded to youtube under this name is way more popular than everything that I made myself put together.


Yes that's the way it is. Every dancing girly girl on youtube will get 10^3 to 10^5 more hits than a download of a good chemistry e-book.

Quote:
The pages were cropped to minimum canvas size and then resized after looking them over.


That's exactly the thing ScanKromsator can do automatically for you. You can save a lot of time with this program due the creation of the e-books. ScanKromsator is freeware from a private person from Russia; nonetheless it's a piece of quality software. But unfortunately I didn't found any English documentation for it (the interface is in English language).

The most difficult part is to set the parameters in the beginning. That's important to set the sensitivity of the program to recognise between text and dirt and shadows on the scanned page. It takes some time and experimentation to find good settings, but than the software can crop, line up, centre and resize a 600 pages scan in 15 minutes.

Maybe you will try it out someday. You need just the program executive and some runtime files in one directory. Download them from the small web presence of ScanKromsator:

http://bolega.hotmail.ru/Ver%205.6A/sk-5.6A.zip
http://bolega.hotmail.ru/Ver%205.81%20NY/dlls.rar

I think this could be a useful tool for you.




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S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 31-10-2007 at 16:01


Thanks for that.

I had been saving this for last, but there will be one more after this, for I had decided that I would scan the 2nd edition of Fieser's Experiments in Organic Chemistry as a companion to the above, also from my personal stash. The lack of interest in the newer book just dampened my enthusiasm for doing this, so it will come later maybe.

This latest scan is Weygand/Hilgetag Preparative Organic Chemistry. It is the fourth edition of this book, which was originally published in German in 1968 and appeared as this English translation in 1972. This book is already known in djvu as the Russian translation, and the original German edition has been heard but not seen by me online. But AFAIK no one else on this planet has felt like scanning the English translation. I've never seen the translation of the 1938 first edition, which appeared as Organic Preparations in 1945, the same year that its author, Conrad Weygand, died.

This 4th ed. is best described as like March's AOC, though perhaps slighter (or rather, less exotic and current only to 1967) in breadth. But instead of a little information for those thinking about things and making curly arrows and such, it gives a little information that may be useful to those interested in actually doing things. Sort of like a combination of March and Organic Reactions. Like March, the reactions are grouped in a certain way; also, thousands of references are given. 8,181. Apparently, one thing not lacking in East Germany at the time was chemistry journals.

It was scanned in 600 dpi with the Canon (4 ppm), batch despeckled and straightened in Finereader, and batch "draft kromsated" in Scankromsator. The margins were set for 40 pixels, and the nifty thing was that the program told me at the end which 3 pages had been to big to fit, and had to be redone from the original scans manually. These cropped pages were batch resized in Photoshop (1209 pages, 2.74 GB), and read/assembled to pdf in Finereader. This gave a 137 MB OCR'd pdf which was compressed to 36.6 MB 600 dpi JBIG2 lossy in Acrobat pro6 pdf optimizer.

This is the list of all 38 of my full book scans (except for Strike's Total Synthesis), and my 3 partial book scans, and the Selected Inorganic Syntheses djvu:
http://www.4shared.com/dir/4287326/d12ea50d/Wacksworks.html

The full content of my host site is available from the usual link.

Not sure that I'd describe Marianne Faithfull as a dancing girly girl...1 year and 2 days later it's up to 90,108 views. Wow.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3N_rNz2oAGA

[Edited on 1-11-2007 by S.C. Wack]




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[*] posted on 1-11-2007 at 08:50


That's a beautiful electronic conversion as always. If you have no objections, I'll be adding it to the site library.

I've downloaded the 4ed Fieser from your collection, and I have the third edition in paper. Is the second edition a sort of classic, like the third edition of Vogel, or will its contents be thoroughly familiar to someone with the 3rd and 4th?




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S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 9-3-2008 at 08:23
Experiments in Organic Chemistry by Fieser 2nd ed 1941


Never seen the 3rd and 4th eds. Fieser is a popular reference in the literature, whether that qualifies as "classic" or not, I don't know. He was certainly widely read in his time. 'Fieser' "experiments in organic chemistry" gave 991 hits at the ACS. Adding '1941' to that got it down to 532.

I scanned this for the same reason as most of the other organic books - I feel that at least 51% of the strength of most but not all of the organic manuals that I've scanned lies in practical hints, not the specific compounds. And this one is another that is heavy on older technique and reagents, that I feel might be useful in some way to serious experimenters. Here and elsewhere I see proper technique ignored routinely. In the nicotine extraction thread, "Sandmeyer" [ironic - 1800's history] says "Authors seem to have limited lab-experience", after Cheapskate (without bothering to actually perform anything resembling the technique given) calls bullshit on the isolation that I posted from Gattermann, before I scanned it. It's an odd comment since the authors of the preparative works that I've scanned tend to be, if not always are, professors responsible for teaching the art to their students, and present sound syntheses. I suppose that some will think that Fieser, like all dead authors, is worthless as well.

This was scanned at 300 dpi, so as not to detail so much of the crapness that is WWII-era paper stock. Scankromsator was used again, even though a setting for all of the many pages with their page number at the bottom - pages with blank spaces at the top of the page - had to be changed manually after the "scankromsate". This meant going through every page and changing "Page v. align" from A to B in these cases, before processing the whole. The horizontal alignment of pages with blank space on the sides was changed from A to C. Finereader's scanner interface with auto brightness and custom scan area scanner settings was used, which should not be done except in a case like this where the scanner's gamma settings pick up too much of the bad details of the paper stock. Only the title page and one other page had to be altered after using Scankromsator, other than resizing to the original 5.5 x 8.5 inch size, resizing back down to 5.5 x 8.5 from another Finereader straightening, which as usual does not agree with Scankromsator straightening and enlarges some pages. The horizontal gap in Scankromsator was lowered from 70 to 20 pixels, and all other settings were default (including auto despeckle) except as noted above for the non-standard pages, and changing the output format to .bmp.

It's a shame that this is the only scan done on my new computer. All of my tools run faster with the big CPU and RAM upgrade. It took 15 minutes to convert 500 pages of bmp to this OCR'd and compressed pdf. It is unfortunate that this last scan is the worst looking, because of the bright gamma setting necessary to not detail the imperfections of the paper.

It's somewhere under the www button in the Wacksworks folder of course. I have deleted the Lassar-Cohn and Selected Inorganic Syntheses djvu's, as they have been replaced with better pdf's of the same.




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[*] posted on 9-3-2008 at 14:28


That reminds me - I have a print copy of Fieser & Fieser's "Advanced Organic Chemistry" textbook, published by Reinhold in 1962, about the 4th or 5th edition, which I bought as one of the "recommended" books for my B.Sc. Chemistry in about 1967. It does not seem to have been revised again since, and has a lot of biochemical interest and on natural product chemistry. It runs to about 1,000 pages, with quite small type which would necessitate probably 600 dpi scanning. If I ever find time to scan it (about 500 scans), would anyone be interested in seeing it?

[Edited on 10-3-08 by JohnWW]
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smile.gif posted on 3-7-2008 at 11:18
N.V. Sidgwick's The Chemical Elements and Their Compounds


I have had this set on my shelf for several years now but never summoned the will to scan its 1700+ pages. I have recently done just that, so now one of my favorite older inorganic works can be found in the forum library:

Volume 1
Volume 2

I am a bit displeased with the page image quality. I manually edited out dark gutters from my 2-pages-at-a-time scanning, but in the final copy there's still a lot of dark edges around the pages that weren't obvious when I examined the raw scans in an image editor. If I come across some software that can automatically remove those sorts of defects I'll upload improved PDFs at some point.

As usual I'm distributing these PDFs at 300 dpi though I scanned at 600. My scanner seems to slow down tremendously for resolutions over 300 dpi, so I rather wonder if I can get away with 300 dpi raw images when trying to scan the 4th edition of Thorpe. If not, it will take ages. Some of the Thorpe volumes are so thick that I'm really worried about ruining them when trying to get them flat for 2 page scanning. I'll abuse bindings in pursuit of good scans, but I don't want to totally destroy them.




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[*] posted on 10-2-2009 at 10:50
Organic Reactions Volume 4


It may now be found in the library.

Contains:

The Diels-Alder Reaction with Maleic Anhydride
The Diels-Alder Reaction: Ethylenic and Acetylenic Dienophiles
The Preparation of Amines by Reductive Alkylation
The Acyloins
The Synthesis of Benzoins
Synthesis of Benzoquinones by Oxidation
The Rosenmund Reduction of Acid Chlorides to Aldehydes
The Wolff-Kishner Reduction

I have volume 5 also and will eventually scan it too.




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[*] posted on 10-2-2009 at 12:33


Just a hint about proficient scanning under linux:
--> as scanner-program use "eikazo"
- It's a one-click-per-page thing, numbering of the output pages is automatical
- you end up with a lot of tif-files ; these can just be converted/resized etc. , by the "convert-command", output as pdf
--> Now, that you have a lot of pdf-pages, these can be chained using the "pdftk"-command .

That's the easiest way I know.
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[*] posted on 24-2-2009 at 17:02


I can't believe you guys manually turn pages to scan in a book. I always assumed those uploads books where scanned using a page feeder after being unbound, or worse guillotined free of their binding.
I appreciate all your efforts so much more now.
The downsize of realising this however is that i always excused myself from adding references because of my reluctance to debind my library, now i know what i must do. Suddenly i wish the fires had engulfed me a couple of weeks ago.

;)




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biggrin.gif posted on 14-3-2010 at 11:52
Ignition! An Informal History of Liquid Rocket Propellants


Between the ages of 9 and 12 I think I read John D. Clark's Ignition! a half dozen times. As I recall it was just a couple of shelves down from The Chemistry of Powder and Explosives at the public library, which is how I noticed it. Having read it again just now more than half my life later I think it holds up at least as well as I remember, perhaps better now that I understand more of the chemistry.

It's a historical summary of and atlas to chemical space rocket propellants. Although it was written 40 years ago, none of the fluorine-rich oxidizers or nuclear thermal rocket designs that Clark expected to continue the march of progress made it into production systems. Clark, writing in the early 1970s, didn't realize that the space race was basically over and that propellant chemistry was all but frozen. As far as I can tell, all surface-to-orbit liquid propellants in use today were test-fired before Sputnik-1 went into orbit. Systems with higher ISP have been deployed, but they are low-thrust electrical systems designed for LEO or beyond. It's the same old workhorse propellants that do the initial orbiting.

You may find Ignition! in the Sciencemadness Library.

Edit: Well blow me down, it looks like someone else already scanned this book. I knew it wasn't available electronically last year when I looked for it... guess it bore re-checking before I digitized it myself! At least it's not a long book; only one afternoon wasted.

[Edited on 3-14-2010 by Polverone]




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[*] posted on 14-3-2010 at 22:11


Never hurts to have more than one scan, often a defect in one doesn't occur in the other. Defects aren't always the fault of the scanning operation, I've several second-hand lab guides that were obviously used in the lab to judge by the pages suffering from the effects of being splattered with reactive chemicals. Torn or missing pages certainly are not unknown.

So thanks for the effort, I don't think it was wasted. Besides, what if the other book-scanner had decided to jump into some MMORPG instead of spending a weekend with that book?




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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 07:11


Quote: Originally posted by Polverone  
Between the ages of 9 and 12 I think I read John D. Clark's Ignition! a half dozen times.
Thanks for posting this. I've rarely read writing about science and technology that's anywhere near as lively as this.
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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 10:27


I did a lot of scanning for my bueraucracy-stuff: Fastest/best way I know now is:
==> Use linux, scan with "eikazo", convert to ps-files first,
==> and then from ps- to pdf- format with "ps2pdf14" : This implements pdf-standard of level 4, with good compression ... (thats the reason to first convert to the ps-format)

Having a directory full of tif-scans, the linux-command-lines would be:
===========
for i in `ls *tif`; do echo $i ; convert $i $i.ps ; done
for i in `ls *ps`; do echo $i ; ps2pdf14 $i $i.pdf ; done
pdftk *pdf cat output all.pdf
===========
After letting it work a while on each of those commands (put it into 1 file to get a single-command-script ...) you now would have a well-compressed e-book in the file all.pdf ...

Obviously you would need to have installed "convert" , "ps2pdf14" and "pdftk" ; the latter beeing not so standard-preinstalled, but well available (recommending Debian: One-click-installation of anything ...)

In order to have the pages within the ebook sorted, the numbering beforehand should be right (no issue if you use the mentioned "eikazo"-program) ...

============

Though nothing is ocr-ed at this point ...




[Edited on 15-3-2010 by chief]

[Edited on 15-3-2010 by chief]

[Edited on 15-3-2010 by chief]

[Edited on 15-3-2010 by chief]
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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 12:03


Quote:
That reminds me - I have a print copy of Fieser & Fieser's "Advanced Organic Chemistry" textbook, published by Reinhold in 1962, about the 4th or 5th edition, which I bought as one of the "recommended" books for my B.Sc. Chemistry in about 1967. It does not seem to have been revised again since, and has a lot of biochemical interest and on natural product chemistry. It runs to about 1,000 pages, with quite small type which would necessitate probably 600 dpi scanning. If I ever find time to scan it (about 500 scans), would anyone be interested in seeing it?


That's an excellent textbook that the local librarians threw away long ago rather than glue it back together :( Many members would probably appreciate it if they had a chance to read it since very few have ever had a chance to study it :cool:




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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 13:45


That book is already scanned and available through the HathiTrust. The one scanned is copyright 1961, fifth printing 1965. A brief search doesn't reveal any later editions.



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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 18:52


I am sorry to have to disappoint would-be readers of Fieser & Fieser's Advanced Organic Chemistry, but that allegedly scanned copy of it on http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003707695 , found by Polverone, has only the title page and page 1 !! All the other pages are missing! I suppose I will just have to scan it all myself, when I find time.
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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 19:41


Quote: Originally posted by JohnWW  
I am sorry to have to disappoint would-be readers of Fieser & Fieser's Advanced Organic Chemistry, but that allegedly scanned copy of it on http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003707695 , found by Polverone, has only the title page and page 1 !! All the other pages are missing! I suppose I will just have to scan it all myself, when I find time.


No, it is scanned in full. I suspect that you are not seeing the full book because you are in New Zealand, and geolocation by IP address is being used to restrict the content served. If you view the entry through a US-based proxy you should be able to see all of it.




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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 19:57


It is scanned in full, but you can only download a "1-page pdf", at least when accessed from the UK. I suspect this is the problem that JohnWW reported (albeit "incorrectly").

[Edited on 16-3-2010 by DJF90]
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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 20:58


Re Fieser & Fieser's Advanced Organic Chemistry (5th Ed., 1961) on http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015003707695 :
Yes, I AM aware that only one page, each in its own scanned PDF file, at a time can be accessed and downloaded; BUT, even then, only the title page, page 1, and the first pages of one or two other chapters, are present as PDF files! For all the rest, I get a "404" or similar message, saying that the PDF file cannot be found on the Apache server.

Because I can access and download at least a few of the pages only, I am sure that the cause cannot be blocking by country by IP address. If that were so, I would not be able to access ANY of the pages.
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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 20:59


The 1-page PDF thing is universal. The link indicates that it is intended as a convenience for printing a page. If you can view (say) page 100 in the browser, you can view the full thing. In order to download the full book you need to use a program like Hathi Helper. I was able to use that earlier today to download all the page images.



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[*] posted on 15-3-2010 at 23:25


I understand what you are saying Polverone, I didnt realise it was universal for the Hathi site though. I randomly clicked on a few pages at the time and they all worked, so I don't know where JohnWW is experiencing problems.
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[*] posted on 18-3-2010 at 21:21


http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-03/video-blazi...

.
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[*] posted on 21-3-2010 at 11:26
Organic Reactions Volume 5


As promised a bit more than a year ago, I have finally scanned Volume 5 of Organic Reactions. I delayed in hopes that the publisher might complete the digitization of older volumes, but no luck so far. It may be found in the library.

This volume contains chapters on the following topics:

The synthesis of acetylenes
Cyanoethylation
The Diels-Alder reaction: quinones and other cyclenones
Preparation of aromatic fluorine compounds from diazonium fluoborates (the Schiemann reaction)
The Friedel and Crafts reaction with aliphatic dibasic acid anhydrides
The Gattermann-Koch reaction
The Leuckart reaction
Selenium dioxide oxidation
The Hoesch synthesis
The Darzens glycidic ester condensation

Now that this volume is digitized, the following Organic Reactions volumes remain in paper-only form: 6,8,9, 11-14, and 16-24.




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