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Author: Subject: The Short Questions Thread (4)
mayko
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[*] posted on 7-1-2019 at 09:24


When I harvest lithium foil from batteries, I try to store it under mineral oil, but between its low density and entrained bubbles, it floats to the top. I could probably add paperclips and a weight or something to keep it submerged, but I wondered if anyone else had protips?



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[*] posted on 7-1-2019 at 10:10


Quote: Originally posted by mayko  
When I harvest lithium foil from batteries, I try to store it under mineral oil, but between its low density and entrained bubbles, it floats to the top. I could probably add paperclips and a weight or something to keep it submerged, but I wondered if anyone else had protips?


I think it would float even without bubbles. Try less dense inert liquid or put something heavy (also inert) on top.

You could also store it in inert gel, or even solid. (maybe paraffin wax) not sure about compatibility, so research.




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ninhydric1
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[*] posted on 7-1-2019 at 20:50


I know MrHomeScientist ampouled some lithium metal in an inert atmosphere, which eliminates the density issue entirely.



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C6(NO2)5CH2CH(CH3)N(NO2)2
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[*] posted on 14-1-2019 at 15:33
what will precipitate first? Calcium hydroxide or ammonia gas?


I have been wondering if you can produce ammonia and a calcium salt from hydrated lime and an ammonium salt. According to this post: http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=7464&a... You can add calcium hydroxide to ammonium chloride to produce ammonia 2NH4Cl+Ca(OH)2-->CaCl2+2NH3+ 2H20. I'd assume that this reaction would go in this direction due to all the different ions being in solution, and the unstable combination (NH4OH) decomposing and "precipitating" ammonia gas. But in this post: https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=83... it says that you can make ammonium nitrate out of calcium nitrate by adding ammonia solution: 2NH4OH+Ca(NO3)2-->2NH4NO3+Ca(OH)2. I suppose that makes sense that the calcium hydroxide would precipitate too, since it is poorly soluble in water (unlike ammonium nitrate) But it also means that adding the calcium hydroxide to an ammonium salt would probably fail to produce any reaction.

So I guess my question is this: Which compound comes out of solution first? and (sorry if this is spoonfeeding) if you hypothetically added calcium hydroxide to a saturated solution of Calcium nitrate-ammonium nitrate double salts, would I get calcium nitrate and ammonia vapor, or would nothing happen? or would it be a partial reaction, and the calcium hydroxide would stop dissolving prior to all the ammonium nitrate being converted?

[Edited on 14-1-2019 by C6(NO2)5CH2CH(CH3)N(NO2)2]




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[*] posted on 14-1-2019 at 19:13
purple zinc chloride


I discovered today that I don't have any zinc chloride. Never mind I thought. I have some zinc from a D cell and plenty of hardware-store HCl of reasonable purity.
After reacting, the resultant solution was a purple/lilac colour. Berating myself, I concluded that stray manganese dioxide from the battery was the most likely culprit. So I repeated with some reagent grade zinc powder.
Same result. It must be some impurity in the HCl. But what? I know that Fe is common but I have tested the acid for Fe in the past with a negative result. Is Mn or Co likely?

[Edited on 15-1-2019 by j_sum1]

2019-01-15 13.12.19.jpg - 313kB
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clearly_not_atara
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[*] posted on 14-1-2019 at 20:11


^Also, solutions of iron chloride are brown.

The HCl itself isn't colored, but with zinc it is? If it were a simple metal chloride the addition of zinc should not change the color. Mn or Co will be present as the divalent salt which should not undergo any sort of redox in this condition.

However, maybe the HCl is a little greenish? That would indicate chromium, as CrCl3 gives a green solution and CrCl2 a blue one. Additionally various aqua-chloro chromium complexes are slow to interconvert and have many different colors.




[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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clearly_not_atara
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 01:07


I noticed that the reaction:

N2 + 5/2 O2 + 2 KOH >> 2 KNO3 + H2O

has ΔH = [2 * -494] + [-285] - [2 * -426] = -421 kJ/mol

Is it possible to induce this reaction somehow?




[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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walruslover69
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 05:42


I can't imagine you would be able to on a small scale. You would probably need a really specialized catalyst. That nitrogen triple bond has a huge activation energy.

I am really surprised how favorable the reaction is though.

[Edited on 29-1-2019 by walruslover69]
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 14:04


I am wondering if anyone can suggest a way to remove a palladium chloride stain from a glass frit. I have tried conc. HCl acid which has reduced the discoloration by approx. 80% however 80% is still not complete. Any suggestions would be appreciated as the funnel was brand new. Thanks .
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[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 15:19


Quote: Originally posted by SHADYCHASE54  
I am wondering if anyone can suggest a way to remove a palladium chloride stain from a glass frit. I have tried conc. HCl acid which has reduced the discoloration by approx. 80% however 80% is still not complete. Any suggestions would be appreciated as the funnel was brand new. Thanks .


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[*] posted on 9-2-2019 at 01:04
3,4,5-Trimethoxyben?


Hey chemoforumers,

Purchased some 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde from a (seemingly) reliable source, however, I have my doubts. Material appears as white flakes/granules. very hard and brittle, and doesn't seem to have any real smell.

I would have expected the compound to have very different physical properties, as similiar subst benzaldehydes (vanillin, 5-bromovanillin, syringaldehyde) have very strong smells and form fine , non-brittle crystals. This might seem obsesive, but want to be sure I have the right stuff;) .

Anyone familliar with the substance? Does this sound like 3,4,5-trimethoxy ben, or definitely something else?




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[*] posted on 22-2-2019 at 15:12


Some time ago, I heated some sugar to make elemental carbon. The resulting mass is very brittle and won't make black marks on paper, unlike graphite. Is it amorphous C?



Useful sites:
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clearly_not_atara
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[*] posted on 22-2-2019 at 15:49


It's called "sugar charcoal".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_charcoal




[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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mayko
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[*] posted on 7-3-2019 at 19:09


I've been reading about molybdenum chemistry, and it seems surprisingly complicated. One pathway I'm interested in trying out would include an oxidation of molybdenum (V) oxytrichloride to molybdenum (VI) trioxide:
MoOCl3 ----????----> MoO3
it's not obvious to me how to do this. I can't find a lot of detail on the oxytrichloride; the book I'm reading says that it decays in cold water, but doesn't give any further information. Any ideas?




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[*] posted on 8-3-2019 at 08:47


I am wondering if someone might have a user manual for Parr pressure vessels pre-magnetic stir drive? I recently aquired a 600ml stirred reactor gland type stirrer however I am finding it quite impossible to source any of the 1980-90 Parr manuals or user guides. Any help would be appreciated.
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