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Author: Subject: Glassware Being Attacked
subsecret
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[*] posted on 13-7-2013 at 15:41
Glassware Being Attacked


What sorts of compounds will attack borosillicate glassware? I'm aware that hot sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and hydroflouric acid (HF) will attack glass. I'm also aware that it depends on concentration. Are there any compounds that I should avoid handling due to damage to my glassware?
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Manifest
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[*] posted on 13-7-2013 at 15:54


I know hot concentrated phosphoric acid attacks glass also.
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bob800
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[*] posted on 13-7-2013 at 15:54


I can't think of any other compounds encountered in a home lab setting that would attack glass... of course, many compounds will strongly adhere to/stain glassware, such as iron oxides, manganese salts, etc. However, these will not cause issues as long as you clean the glass immediately.

[Edited on 14-7-2013 by bob800]
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[*] posted on 13-7-2013 at 15:55


Soluble flouride salts will damage glassware, ammonium bifluoride for example.
Don't forget other hydroxides not just NaOH. Molten of course is a lot worse than a solution, and by worse I mean total annihilation.

Edit(spelling):P

[Edited on 7-14-2013 by chemcam]




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Mesa
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[*] posted on 14-7-2013 at 07:33


Potassium hydroxide is more destructive than sodium hydroxide on glassware.

Source: Forum search.
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ElizabethGreene
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[*] posted on 14-7-2013 at 09:27


I've had several pieces damaged by room temperature concrete. (Goddamn cats.)
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[*] posted on 14-7-2013 at 09:44


Quote: Originally posted by Mesa  
Potassium hydroxide is more destructive than sodium hydroxide on glassware.

Source: Forum search.

I thought it was the other way around? NaOH attacks it faster because of some "sodium property"? I may be wrong.




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Oscilllator
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[*] posted on 15-7-2013 at 00:39


Nah, KOH is more corrosive because its a stronger base (or so I have been led to believe).




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[*] posted on 15-7-2013 at 06:13


<strong>Mesa</strong>, <strong>Variscite </strong>, <strong>Oscilllator</strong>: Don't forget that the forum has a <img src="./images/xpblue/top_search.gif" /> <a href="search.php">Search</a> function.

Here is an example of previous discussion on KOH/NaOH and glass:
<strong><a href="viewthread.php?tid=15633">Potassium hydroxide vs. glass</a></strong>

<strong>ElizabethGreene</strong>, I have (unwillingly) repeated your experiment, and my independent observations would seem to support your conclusion. Goddamn cats, indeed.




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Manifest
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[*] posted on 15-7-2013 at 13:15


Quote: Originally posted by bfesser  
<strong>Mesa</strong>, <strong>Variscite </strong>, <strong>Oscilllator</strong>: Don't forget that the forum has a <img src="./images/xpblue/top_search.gif" /> <a href="search.php">Search</a> function.


The forum search function is well, crap.
It doesn't find much and when you search google you tend to find what you're looking for.

use "experiment you're looking for here site:sciencemadness.org"
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kt5000
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[*] posted on 26-7-2013 at 07:18


Quote: Originally posted by ElizabethGreene  
I've had several pieces damaged by room temperature concrete. (Goddamn cats.)


The combination of room temp concrete and gravity is harsh, claimed one of my flat-bottom boiling flasks last week. :)
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simba
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[*] posted on 27-7-2013 at 19:15


Quote: Originally posted by ElizabethGreene  
I've had several pieces damaged by room temperature concrete. (Goddamn cats.)


hahaha we all know that feeling. Concrete surely attacks glass more agressively than any other compound.
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