Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  24    26    28  ..  65
Author: Subject: Pretty Pictures (2)
Brain&Force
Hazard to Lanthanides
*****




Posts: 1295
Registered: 13-11-2013
Location: UW-Madison
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-1-2015 at 21:14


That is the most beautiful sample of fluorite I've ever seen.



Raney nickel can't hydrogenate dank memes.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Jylliana
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 126
Registered: 3-10-2014
Location: The Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Bubbly ^-^

[*] posted on 13-1-2015 at 02:41



Sulfur heated with a torch and then dropped in cold water. According to the research I did, it should be 'plastic sulfur' or χ-sulfur.

The only strange thing is, that this is very dark in color and rubbery to the touch(feels like a gummy bear), while plastic sulfur should be very hard and pale yellow.

Unfortunately it's not stable. It will convert back to α-sulfur over time.

Any information about this is welcome.




24/f/nl
Analytical Chemistry.

Al, Br, Cu, Hg, S, C, Ag, Na, Pb, I, Cd, Ga, P, Mg, Fe, Be, Au, Bi, Si.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 4809
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Metastable, and that's good enough.

[*] posted on 13-1-2015 at 04:37


My experience with heating sulfur and quenching is that it is possible to get anything from near black to grey to bright yellow. Consistency can be gooey, tacky, like putty, brittle. As it decomposes back to S8 it becomes less plastic and often floury.
It depends on its heating history -- what temperature, how long and how quick the quench was. I think it affects the chain length. Sulfur has a remarkable number of allotropes, nit many of them particularly stable. It would not surprise me if it was discovered that plastic sulfur contained a good mix of these: affecting its properties. Add to that the possibility of some oxidation on heating and the common presence of impurities and you have another dimension of variability.

Your sample is quite interesting in a sci-fi-movie-prop kind of way.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Molecular Manipulations
National Hazard
****




Posts: 447
Registered: 17-12-2014
Location: The Garden of Eden
Member Is Offline

Mood: High on forbidden fruit

[*] posted on 13-1-2015 at 08:22


Quote: Originally posted by Brain&Force  
That is the most beautiful sample of fluorite I've ever seen.

Thanks, I want to know why it's pink, but I don't want to destroy the sample - the chemist's dilemma!
Jylliana, I've noticed the black color of plastic sulfur only when using the 90% "graden grade" stuff, which contains 10% bentonite clay. I think the black color comes from the clay or it's reaction with molten sulfur. When using 99% sulfur I get a grey-brown color if heated quickly and a lighter yellow-red color if heated slowly over a long period of time.
What grade of sulfur did you use?




-The manipulator
We are all here on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I don't know. -W. H. Auden
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Jylliana
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 126
Registered: 3-10-2014
Location: The Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: Bubbly ^-^

[*] posted on 16-1-2015 at 09:23



Crystallized Gallium :)




24/f/nl
Analytical Chemistry.

Al, Br, Cu, Hg, S, C, Ag, Na, Pb, I, Cd, Ga, P, Mg, Fe, Be, Au, Bi, Si.
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
blargish
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 166
Registered: 25-9-2013
Location: Canada
Member Is Offline

Mood: AZIDES AZIDES AZIDES

[*] posted on 16-1-2015 at 14:20


On the mineral trend, here is my own sample of fluorite (it's unfortunately in massive form) as well as one of my favs: a sample of labradorite (a plagioclase feldspar) showing its characteristic "labradorescence"

Fluorite Massive.jpg - 271kB Labradorite.jpg - 418kB




BLaRgISH
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Zombie
Forum Hillbilly
*****




Posts: 1700
Registered: 13-1-2015
Location: Florida PanHandle
Member Is Offline

Mood: I just don't know...

[*] posted on 16-1-2015 at 14:50


Quote: Originally posted by wish i had a kraken!!!  
It is not termite :-)



[Edited on 27-7-2014 by wish i had a kraken!!!]


I just read thru this whole thread, and I am impressed to the bone.
Some of the most beautiful and fascinating things I have ever seen.
Kudos to Everyone for their work, and even more so for sharing it all.

The post that stuck out... I know the silliest one of all.
It reminded me of this stunt performed yearly. Go figure!

KjArz3y.png - 306kB

[Edited on 16-1-2015 by Zombie]




They tried to have me "put to sleep" so I came back to return the favor.
Zom.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
sasan
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 92
Registered: 22-2-2014
Location: TEHRAN / IRAN
Member Is Offline

Mood: Radiative

[*] posted on 17-1-2015 at 07:06


Theses are the pictures of copper ores in IRAN.cotains some minerals of this elements such as covellite,chalkopyrite,bornite and some other.very beautiful and amazing colors.photographed in AM university in tehran/iran.

[Edited on 17-1-2015 by sasan]

Screenshot_2015-01-17-18-25-17.jpg - 1MBScreenshot_2015-01-17-18-24-35.jpg - 819kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hegi
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 199
Registered: 27-9-2013
Member Is Offline

Mood: No idea.

[*] posted on 17-1-2015 at 12:10


What about these fluorite crystals? :P

greenfluorite.jpg - 592kB yellowfluorite.jpg - 425kB




Our webpage has been shut down forever cause nobody was willing to contribute. Shame on you all!!!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Loptr
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1284
Registered: 20-5-2014
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Grateful

[*] posted on 19-1-2015 at 19:01
Sodium


I heated sodium to its melting point while stirring, and once it broke into tiny globules, I cut the heat and let it cool. Next time I will cut both stirring and heat, which will hopefully result in tiny spherical sodium.

This form is very reactive, though! Exposure to air instantly tarnishes it.

image.jpg - 1.9MB

[Edited on 20-1-2015 by Loptr]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
The Volatile Chemist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1973
Registered: 22-3-2014
Location: 'Stil' in the lab...
Member Is Offline

Mood: Copious

[*] posted on 20-1-2015 at 09:11


That's gorgeous! A nice, collect-able form, minus the stirbar (or with, we all have our preferences....)



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Loptr
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1284
Registered: 20-5-2014
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Grateful

[*] posted on 20-1-2015 at 09:33


Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
That's gorgeous! A nice, collect-able form, minus the stirbar (or with, we all have our preferences....)


The stir-bar didn't join with the sodium. I was on my way to bed and decided to snap a picture before it had a chance to oxidize by the morning, so no clean up was done, etc.

I am assuming any water within the mineral oil I was using either distilled out of the mixture or was dried by the sodium, because when I got up this morning it was still as bright and shiny.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
The Volatile Chemist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1973
Registered: 22-3-2014
Location: 'Stil' in the lab...
Member Is Offline

Mood: Copious

[*] posted on 20-1-2015 at 15:54


Nice! I thought that was your stirbar coated in sodium :)



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1342
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 21-1-2015 at 07:09


Crude sulfanilic acid has a pretty purple iridescence to it:

image.jpg - 170kB




Note to self: Tare the damned flask.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
The Volatile Chemist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1973
Registered: 22-3-2014
Location: 'Stil' in the lab...
Member Is Offline

Mood: Copious

[*] posted on 21-1-2015 at 12:46


Huh. Procedure, please?



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1342
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 21-1-2015 at 12:53


Sulfonation of aniline. Simply heat aniline and concentrated sulfuric acid at 180-190 in an oil bath for 4-5 hours. Pouring the finished reaction into cold water precipitates it out and it can be recrystallized and washed. The procedure I used is from Norris Experimental Organic Chemistry. The pages are here:

http://www.books-about-california.com/Pages/Experimental_Org...




Note to self: Tare the damned flask.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Firmware21
Harmless
*




Posts: 33
Registered: 22-1-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Ņ͈̣̭̺̈ͬ͊̔i̓̿͑ͯ̂ͪ҉̸̺̀t͉̣͕͙̟̪̅͐͂̏͌ͭ͗̑͝ṙ̶̛̙̥̝̻̟̓ͬ̾ͧ͒͘ͅa͒͊ͯ̾̑̏̌̓̕҉͚͚͓͔͙͚̥t͆̌͑ͩ̐͗ ͖̻̲̪̲̙͘ͅe͙͕͙̙̤̤̫̒ͩͣ̅̊̍̉͒ͬ́͟ͅs͈̬̮̥̻͂ͥͨ̂ͮͨ͒́͠ !!!

[*] posted on 22-1-2015 at 05:15



These beauties crystallized out from a "homemade" FeCl3 etchant solution. Since I didn't want to use H2O2 to oxidize it (I like my solutions concentrated), FeCl2 was still present, even after 7 month of "oxidation".





View user's profile View All Posts By User
bismuthate
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 803
Registered: 28-9-2013
Location: the island of stability
Member Is Offline

Mood: self reacting

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 08:27


F**K it I have no idea how to work the photos on this forum.
Here have a link. It's a bismuth thiocyanate complex.
http://imgur.com/dTrjWSk




I'm not a liar, I'm just an enthusiastic celebrant of opposite day.
I post pictures of chemistry on instagram as bismuthate. http://iconosquare.com/bismuthate
or this viewer if you don't have an instagram (it sucks though) http://web.stagram.com/n/bismuthate
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1342
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 08:38


Quote: Originally posted by bismuthate  
F**K it I have no idea how to work the photos on this forum.
Here have a link. It's a bismuth thiocyanate complex.
image.jpg - 1.5MB

http://imgur.com/dTrjWSk


I hope you don't mind that I tried to see if it was a problem with the picture dimensions/file size and uploaded it quoted for you. Not sure why it seems to work for me. Are you clicking "upload file"? Does it give an error messages?





Note to self: Tare the damned flask.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bismuthate
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 803
Registered: 28-9-2013
Location: the island of stability
Member Is Offline

Mood: self reacting

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 08:50


I was just inserting the link it gives for forums and I couldn't resize and it was giant.
Thank's for quoting it so that it's visible though.




I'm not a liar, I'm just an enthusiastic celebrant of opposite day.
I post pictures of chemistry on instagram as bismuthate. http://iconosquare.com/bismuthate
or this viewer if you don't have an instagram (it sucks though) http://web.stagram.com/n/bismuthate
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Mailinmypocket
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1342
Registered: 12-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 08:59


Ah righto. The roundabout way I use sometimes for that problem is to upload it to whatever image site you like, use that site to resize the photo, save the photo in its reformatted size to my computer. Then upload as attachment to sciencemadness. Obviously there are programs to do this instead of image hosting sites but this way works fine.



Note to self: Tare the damned flask.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
The Volatile Chemist
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1973
Registered: 22-3-2014
Location: 'Stil' in the lab...
Member Is Offline

Mood: Copious

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 13:23


Both the bismuth complex and iron complexes are great! What was your bismuth source?
Looks like an iron thiocyanate complex, but not as deep...

[Edited on 1-23-2015 by The Volatile Chemist]




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
bismuthate
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 803
Registered: 28-9-2013
Location: the island of stability
Member Is Offline

Mood: self reacting

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 14:24


It was bismuth nitrate.



I'm not a liar, I'm just an enthusiastic celebrant of opposite day.
I post pictures of chemistry on instagram as bismuthate. http://iconosquare.com/bismuthate
or this viewer if you don't have an instagram (it sucks though) http://web.stagram.com/n/bismuthate
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Zephyr
National Hazard
****




Posts: 326
Registered: 30-8-2013
Location: Seattle, WA
Member Is Offline

Mood: I am pinkhippo11 on reddit.

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 16:13


Bismuthate how did you make your bismuth complex?

Here is some barium chloride crystals and the disgusting iron impurities separated from it, iodine crystals, and some lead iodide.







[Edited on 1-24-2015 by Pinkhippo11]




Sciencemadness Patches for sale! U2U me if you are interested.
http://imgur.com/a/QmpHn http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=62566&...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bismuthate
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 803
Registered: 28-9-2013
Location: the island of stability
Member Is Offline

Mood: self reacting

[*] posted on 23-1-2015 at 19:02


I just mixed some potassium thiocyanate and bismuth nitrate solutions and crystallized. It's not pure of course. I'm working on recrystalizing it.
How did you make an iodine crystal that big?




I'm not a liar, I'm just an enthusiastic celebrant of opposite day.
I post pictures of chemistry on instagram as bismuthate. http://iconosquare.com/bismuthate
or this viewer if you don't have an instagram (it sucks though) http://web.stagram.com/n/bismuthate
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  24    26    28  ..  65

  Go To Top