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alexleyenda
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[*] posted on 19-2-2015 at 19:31


Yep, it's the famous silver tree. They're crystals. At the beginning they are needle shaped cristals up to 5 mm long, and as the reaction goes on, branches of very small crystals form on the first crystals, so thin that light is absorbed or trapped in there so that's why the silver look so dark. The dark very small crystals look like a powder tho. It is very fragile, actually it really looks like a tree, when you shake it a bit all the "branches" move. If you shake it hard, it all falls.

In fact, if you shake it hard, it falls just like that :


agno3.jpg - 70kB agno32.jpg - 42kB

Edit : put back the original photo for easier comparison

[Edited on 20-2-2015 by alexleyenda]




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[*] posted on 19-2-2015 at 19:39


It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.




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[*] posted on 23-2-2015 at 12:29


Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.

I agree! I love all of the crystalline products here. By the way, nice title ("Forum Hillbilly") :)




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[*] posted on 23-2-2015 at 12:35


Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
It really is stunning. I guess you could compare the growth the a fractile.

To me, this is the coolest thread on the forum. It's inspiring.


I see my use of a made up, quasi English language confirms the "Forum HillBilly" title.

Soooo embarrassing... :(




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[*] posted on 2-3-2015 at 21:21


For the first time in months I had a little free time, so I decided to extract cinnamaldehyde. Here are a few photos ; it has a red color under bright light, a brown color under weak light, and a yellow color diluted in a little bit of ether. I got that ether (last photo) by condensation of ethanol in conc. sulfuric acid at 145°C. That was clearly one of the most frightening reaction I have done :p

c2.jpg - 40kB c3.jpg - 33kB

c1.jpg - 42kB ether.jpg - 50kB

[Edited on 3-3-2015 by alexleyenda]




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[*] posted on 2-3-2015 at 21:36


Very beautiful! I agree, distilling diethyl ether can be a bit nerve racking with its low auto ignition temp. Thanks for sharing.



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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 15:21


alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?




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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 15:25


Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.
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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 15:29


Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


Lol. It's pretty contagious too as we just received over a foot and should be getting more on Thursday. The East Coast is getting buried.
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alexleyenda
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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 15:53


Quote: Originally posted by gdflp  
Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.

That would be a right answer hahaha. There was snow all round me so it was easier to take that than prepare an ice bath. Anyway the ice bath would have become a real 100% ice bath if I had used that. I'm from Québec, Canada before you ask :p




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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 03:59


Not really sure what this is, I guess it is some form of
K6[Co2(CN)10]. If you treat Cobalt(II)-Solutions with a low amount of Cyanide you'll get Co(II)cyanide, analogous to Nickel. If you continue to add more Cyanide the quite muddy looking thick brown cyanide goes into a green [Co(CN)5H2O]3-. This compound is sensitive to oxygen, so you'll have to work in oxygen-free water and under inert gas. I did it with regular destilled water and without any inert gas so the green complex wouldn't even build up and directly went into it's oxidized from which is a reddish solution. I am not sure what the composition of that exactly is. But if you manage to get the green complex and add enough Ethanol purple crystalls of K6[Co2(CN)10] should fall out. I did it with the red solution and the same happened. But since most cyanides and cyano-compounds of heavy metals are insoluble in Ethanol this could be any other Co-Cyano-Salt.

The color still fits and perhaps the reddish color of the solution came from rests of Co(II)cyanide, could be. There is a Co(III)cyanide but that one is blue, so this shouldn't be it, still this stuff reacts with water to a reddish Hydrate. Since the color of the crystals fit I'd rather go with K6[Co2(CN)10]. It's hard to see but that stuff is actually the Cobalt Version von Potassium Ferrocyanide. You could write it like that but data on the complex showed that it's rather written down as mentioned above.

Still quite interesting, the chemistry of Cobalt-Cyano-Complexes. Stay up for more in summer. I'm currently planing a whole bunch of d-Metal complexes. Just went through a dozen of literature and still not finished yet. Till now it looks preatty cool and I'll try to make most of these forgotten compounds, soon. The one mentioned here is an example from the cobalt section but there are far better ones.

So I hope you like it :D.




EDIT:

So I isolated the brown-purple stuff and dissolved it in some water again and got a perfect yellow solution. That color is quite typical for the Hexacyanocobaltate(III). That stuff is like the Iron version quite unreactive and should -according to literature - not react with Peroxide in any way. I tried it and nothing happened. Co(II) and Cyanide can be boiled with oxygen for some time to get that stuff but it's quite cold in my lab and that stuff still build up. So I'm not sure what the intermediate produrct was, there are some complexes mentioned with 5 cyano ligands and one other like water or OH- depending on ration and amount of air. Could be one of them and this was oxidized while shaking it in the testtube with air to the yellow Cobaltate(III). There is quite some stuff you can try out here especially when you work under argon.
Cobalt.jpg - 48kB

[Edited on 4-3-2015 by fluorescence]
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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 04:58


Quote: Originally posted by gdflp  
Quote: Originally posted by Zombie  
alexleyenda ,

Can you explain how that last reaction photo happened?

Was that all from a leaking join in the glassware?

Is it some sort of foam or crystalline?


It's a very rare thing called snow;) which you, being a lucky bastard in Florida, would know nothing of right now unlike those of us who are up north.:mad: It reduces the evaporation of the ether product.



Oh yes. I have heard of this "snow".

Much like Mr. blogfast, and the mythical "thumper" i did not believe such a thing really existed. :D

Now I really feel stupid~~~~~:(




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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 05:37


S=N-O-W :)
Tungsten (I) thionitrite

LoL :D ;)




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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 20:50


one nothing, plus one nothing, always equals two nothings, no matter what anyone says.

Sorry.

Infinite mass or perfect vacuum... take your pick. :)

[Edited on 3-5-2015 by Zombie]




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[*] posted on 5-3-2015 at 09:18


Infinite mass :) We've been getting a lot of snow in the mid-west of Ohio.



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[*] posted on 5-3-2015 at 13:43


I just received a piece of Bismuth, nothing special but I always loved the look of shiny metallic shards of bismuth.

11040768_534994893309921_720935822_n.jpg - 85kB




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[*] posted on 5-3-2015 at 14:04


Me too! Keep an eye on that piece - freshly broken, it's nice and silvery. But over time it oxidizes very slowly, and develops a yellow tinge.
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[*] posted on 5-3-2015 at 14:42


Nice picture! I was looking at SM today, and someone was looking over my shoulder; got a nice 'silver tree' discussion started with them because of this page.



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[*] posted on 7-3-2015 at 06:01


Quote: Originally posted by alexleyenda  
I just received a piece of Bismuth, nothing special but I always loved the look of shiny metallic shards of bismuth.

I prefer the cristalline Bismuth with fractalo-cubic-Maya-temple shape and petroleum iridescent colour :D
Bsimuth cristals images

I own quite a lot from mineral Bourses/Fairs/Saloon at relatively cheap prices.
Also from such places cristaline Silicium, cristaline Carborundum (SiC) and Quartz Gold Aqua (transparent colorless Quartz that turns pale blue owing to gold atoms inserted into cristal latice by special rays), Quartz Titanium (the same but with Titanium...display metallic look with petrol iridescence),...

[Edited on 7-3-2015 by PHILOU Zrealone]




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[*] posted on 7-3-2015 at 14:37


I love the way crystals is spelled in your link :)
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[*] posted on 8-3-2015 at 09:59
Mercury (I) Bromide


Just made this mercury (I) bromide. Fluoresces salmon color under UV light.

Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 12.34.16 PM.png - 1.4MB Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 12.58.08 PM.png - 2MB




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[*] posted on 8-3-2015 at 12:27


That's unique! I just made some copper(I) ferricyanide (Or ferrocyanide, I'm not entirely sure that the ferricyanide didn't get reduced...



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[*] posted on 8-3-2015 at 12:28


Quote: Originally posted by Gooferking Science  
Just made this mercury (I) bromide. Fluoresces salmon color under UV light.


That sounds like dangerous stuff, but I like the colors :p




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[*] posted on 19-3-2015 at 14:27


Mg+NaCl thermite :)

IMG_3611.JPG - 734kB
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[*] posted on 19-3-2015 at 14:43


Quote: Originally posted by Jimmymajesty  
Mg+NaCl thermite :)


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Nice photo. Well done. :)
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