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Author: Subject: Carbon arc Furnace
toxin
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[*] posted on 3-5-2006 at 10:21


I don't trust using power directly from a wall outlet to produce a spark, is there anything wrong with poducing a spark for this furnace from something with a lower current yet high voltage like a stun gun powered from a salvaged computer power supply ?
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12AX7
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[*] posted on 3-5-2006 at 11:38


It's not a spark, it's an arc. You want high current because well, high voltage sucks.

A stun gun especially. That has single pulses of limited energy. You need continuous power. Nothing a computer supply is capable of producing, either. More than four times that.

Tim




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[*] posted on 3-5-2006 at 12:36


I once played with computer PSU connecting two graphite rods to 12V and gnd. This rail was rated to 8A at 12V and after some unsuccesfull atempts i was able to produce microscopic arc. I rubbed gently graphite rods with each other and sometimes there emerged small unstable arc. It was seen as very bright point of light and rods got hot almost immediately. Normally I managed to hold this arc 10 sec or less but in some cases it burned more than 1 min continously.

Such small and unstable arc has no practical value in my opinion but it was quite a fun to play with.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2006 at 09:04


I have a way of producing a low powered arc easy enough, with two 110/220v transformers. I'll put the plan soon.

I discovered it by mistake, and you can create and sustain an 5 mm to 1 cm arc for as long as you want. You don't need carbon electrods either; it'll form from metal electrodes aswell. Not good for welding though, due to the low power.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2006 at 10:31


Oh yeah, heh, I was messing with my induction heater project one day, testing with a load resistor- on accident I loaded it across the power supply rails and got a handsome arc. This was +200VDC and a 50 ohm wirewound resistor, so around 4A flowing = 800W, until the resistor heats up and the value drifts anyway (depending on the tempco of the metal used for the resistor).

Beautiful arc, reasonably thick at 4A, good length about 1/8 or was it 1/4", hissing since it's a filtered DC supply, only popping when struck or broke. :D

Tim




Seven Transistor Labs LLC http://seventransistorlabs.com/
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