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Author: Subject: Problems with a resistive ballast arc furnace (resolved)
Gooferking Science
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 08:24
Problems with a resistive ballast arc furnace (resolved)


I was trying to make an arc furnace, but it didn't work. I am not sure why... I was using a resistive ballast to limit the current coming from the wall. The resistive ballast was made by adding one teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate to one gallon of water. The (+) electricity came from the wall (120v), and ran through the resistive ballast, and then to a carbon electrode. The (-) side just went directly to another carbon electrode from the wall. Unfortunately no arc was created :( do you think that the ballast just isn't conductive enough? If so, how much sodium bicarbonate do I need? I used the search engine, but I couldn't find anything on this subject.

I do have 2 MOT's, one that is taken apart, and one that isn't. If someone could walk me through how to make an inductive ballast with one of these, I would appreciate it! An inductive ballast is more energy efficient anyways...

[Edited on 27-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]

[Edited on 27-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]

[Edited on 27-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 09:36


This may prove useful:

http://books.google.com/books?id=V4VPAAAAMAAJ&printsec=f...




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Gooferking Science
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 14:25


I found the problem! Actually there was two. I had a bad power cord, and didn't have enough baking soda. Now it is working great! I melted copper, steel, and I melted some rock into obsidian.

[Edited on 27-10-2013 by Gooferking Science]




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hyfalcon
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 15:31


Pictures? I've always wanted to put one of these together. I've got a couple 1" graphite rods 1 foot long that I would like to use if possible.
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 16:25


How many amps is the arc? I always thought that you needed to step the voltage down to about 40V so as to increase the current, but if you can make an arc furnace without a step-down transformer, then I might try making one myself.



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Gooferking Science
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[*] posted on 27-10-2013 at 17:57


Hyfalcon - I took some videos of melting things with the new arc furnace. I will make a video on YouTube, then share it with the forum. Those graphite rods will be great for a furnace!

Cheddite Cheese - I am unsure of the amperage, because I do not have an ammeter. Although it wasn't popping my 20 amp breaker, I am guessing it was pulling 10 - 18 amps. I always thought you would need a step down transformer too until I decided to try this today with a resistive ballast. It works great! I will be building a proper mini-furnace to house the arc sometime in the near future, then I will be able to have a mini steel foundry in my backyard! But for now I am just messing with melting random things.




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testimento
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[*] posted on 15-2-2014 at 17:24


Could one use transformer and dimmer to control the arc power or should a ballast be used anyways? I would first put the dimmer and then through transformer to bring down the voltage to around 40V and then insert the wires into the electrodes.
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[*] posted on 15-2-2014 at 17:58


You need the ballast.
When the arc ignites the plasma has a resistance near zero. This will blow every fuse.

Whats wrong with water and baking soda?
Thats ancient technology but simple and functional.

/ORG

[Edited on 16-2-2014 by Organikum]




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testimento
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[*] posted on 16-2-2014 at 11:37


No, there's nothing wrong with that, actually it sounds just perfect for simple setups I like. :D I was just wondering will it need adjustments and how detrimental is the size of the water tank?
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