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Author: Subject: Okey Dokey.
Hermes_Trismegistus
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[*] posted on 19-10-2004 at 17:55
Okey Dokey.


Barium Carbonate is a common chemical used in pottery. It decomposes at ~1300, releasing Carbon Dixide and leaving Barium Oxide. When Barium Oxide is heated strongly in air it forms Barium Peroxide. When Barium Peroxide is dissolved into sulfuric acid, it forms insoluble Barium Sulfate and a strong Hydrogen Peroxide solution.

If the Barium Sulfate was heated strongly would Sulfur Trioxide gas evolve leaving Barium Oxide?

Are there any other ways to relieve the Barium Sulfate of its burdensome Sulfate? (it wants a divorce)

P.S.
(please....no responses about alloying the barium with ununnium and shooting it into the sun with a rocket ship propelled by walnut flavoured jellybeans and used condoms..)

[Edited on 20-10-2004 by Hermes_Trismegistus]




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BromicAcid
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[*] posted on 19-10-2004 at 18:22


I don't think heating barium sulfate to yield sulfur trioxide is possible. My handbook of chemistry and physics gives a melting point for barium sulfate of 1580 C, nothing mentioned of decomposition, and even if it did liberated SO3 later, the temp would be too high and disproportionate it between sulfur dioxide, sulfur, and oxygen.

Heating barium sulfate with carbon yields a mixture of barium oxide and sulfide, sulfur dioxide gas and carbon monoxide exit. A mixture of barium sulfate with aluminum powder should yield barium metal, barium sulfate, barium oxide, and barium peroxide. Of course they would be difficult to separate.

Acidic azide solutions are strong reducing agents, maybe you could give one of those a try ;)




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[*] posted on 19-10-2004 at 19:02


With a 1580C melting point and an even higher temperature of decomposition there is an obvious hurdle to overcome if you wish to decompose with heat.

You may want to try reduction with aluminium. Is it possible? In the free metal it could be separated from the Al oxide via mechanical separation while melted (Ba mp is around 725C).

Industrial reduction follows the below series of overall reactions.

BaSO4 + 2C = BaS + 2CO2
BaS + CO2 + H2O = BaCO3 + H2S

BaSO4 + SiO2 + C = BaSiO3 + SO2 + CO

Both reactions produce an acid soluble product which can be further manipulated.
The temperatures involved however are around 1000C. Still, it allows for a lower temperature than roasting the sulfate independently.

One novel idea if you have lots of time on your hands. Microbial reduction:D!

http://water.usgs.gov/nrp/proj.bib/microbiology/barite.html
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S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 19-10-2004 at 19:04


Heating the sulfate with Na2CO3 will give you BaCO3 in high yield.
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Hermes_Trismegistus
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[*] posted on 19-10-2004 at 19:24
That's the fuckin' ticket!!!


(clap hands)

Edit: Thank you all very much.

[Edited on 20-10-2004 by Hermes_Trismegistus]




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[*] posted on 21-10-2004 at 18:13


Na<sub>2</sub>CO<sub>3</sub> + BaSO<sub>4</sub> =x joule=> Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> + BaCO<sub>3</sub>

=> BaCO3 is suppose to precipitate, filter, heat BaCO3 to release CO and make BaO<sub>2</sub> (just simple Q, what goes up to 1300°C?).

Here's the idea, passing H<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> on BaO<sub>2</sub> on a mesh so the BaSO<sub>4</sub> is automaticly filtered, dripping conc. H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>. Then why not reusing the Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> (previously dehydrated) to clear up some more water in the Peroxide? (is Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> soluble in Peroxide?)

=> Go get your "My First V2 Rocket" at your local x-Mart :cool:
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