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Author: Subject: Thinking of buying this glass kit...
weeksie98
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 09:31
Thinking of buying this glass kit...


This glassware kit looks interesting, but the description appears to have been replaced with that of a Pyrex RB flask. Does anyone have any inkling whether or not this kit will be of good quality? It's borosilicate class b from Cole-Parmer.
http://www.coleparmer.com/buy/product/98261-general-lab-glas...
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Muffn Man
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 10:10


Hi Weeksie,

I looked at the parts in the kit and it looks like a nice assortment of goodies for any new lab. What concerns me, though, is that there are no distillation adapters or condensers listed. I think that you would benefit from these items (almost indispensible) . Class B glassware is just not certified as accurate within Class A standards.

For $135 US, you can order from China (if you are so inclined) and get:
1.500ml round bottom flask
2.250ml round bottom flask
3.100ml round bottom flask
4.50ml round bottom flask
5.25ml round bottom flask
6.Thermometer adapter
7.Hollow glass stopper
8.Bleed tube
9.Distillation column,200mm jacket length
10.West condenser,190mm jacket length
11.Separatory funnel,125ml
12.Vaccum take-off adapter
13.Claisen adapter
14.Distillation adapter,75┬░Angle

Look through the Reagents and Apparatus Acquisition forum and you should find a number of suppliers mentioned.
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chemrox
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 10:52


Since you're probably not doing quantitative analytical chemistry, the class A or B issue is probably not an issue. You will want a still. I think you could all this stuff on ebay for a lot less and have money left over for a still. I'd look at semi-micro kit for standard taper glass size 14/20.



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weeksie98
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 15:05
Still?


Thanks.
I'm just starting out, are you sure a still is the best purchase for me? Prior to your mentioning it, I haven't seen any mention of a still as essential equipment, and I don't have ANY glassware at the moment. Do you think it would be best for me to start with an Erlenmeyer or two, maybe this set and some volumetric glass and distillation apparatus, and work my way up to more advanced pieces of equipment, or should I splash on a still immediately?
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Blackzoid
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 15:56


Quote: Originally posted by weeksie98  
Thanks.
I'm just starting out, are you sure a still is the best purchase for me? Prior to your mentioning it, I haven't seen any mention of a still as essential equipment, and I don't have ANY glassware at the moment. Do you think it would be best for me to start with an Erlenmeyer or two, maybe this set and some volumetric glass and distillation apparatus, and work my way up to more advanced pieces of equipment, or should I splash on a still immediately?


"Still" is a common name for a complete distillation apparatus. Although i'd probably only use the term "still" for things like moonshine setups it is still correct.

[Edited on 15-11-2013 by Blackzoid]
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gravityzero
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 16:25


Quote: Originally posted by weeksie98  
Thanks.
I'm just starting out, are you sure a still is the best purchase for me? Prior to your mentioning it, I haven't seen any mention of a still as essential equipment, and I don't have ANY glassware at the moment. Do you think it would be best for me to start with an Erlenmeyer or two, maybe this set and some volumetric glass and distillation apparatus, and work my way up to more advanced pieces of equipment, or should I splash on a still immediately?


It all depends on what you want to do. The distillation setup, still or whatever, is one of the most useful tools in the lab.
Get a couple boiling flasks, couple different condensers and if I were you I'd go with 24/40 on most of it. That is one of the most common sizes for this type of equipment.

The equipment in the listing is also a good start and much needed items.

As mentioned before, check auction sites for good deals on quality new/used equipment.



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Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 15-11-2013 at 19:38


The glassware listed is mostly basic lab glassware, not an organic kit, which is what Muffn Man is describing. It is not a bad price for new glassware, but if you wanted a basic kit of basic glassware, you can find similar kits on Ebay, Amazon and other places as well. Shipping costs can add a lot, however, so that is one advantage of some kits, depend on the postage costs. But you could get a more complete kit if you buy used glassware on Ebay. I have some of this glassware, but not everything shown. But I sell it for about half their price.

If you want an organic kit, you would want to decide what scale you are thinking of, 14/20 is best for 10-250 ml, 24/40 is best for 100 - 1000+ ml, and 19/22 (which is a little rarer) is between them in scale. The 14/20 kits are not too pricey, for about $100 or more you can get a nice simple used kit or for a little more, a new one. But I would wait to get that once you have done a few simpler basic chemistry experiments, so you can decide what scale you are comfortable with and what equipment you might need.
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weeksie98
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[*] posted on 16-11-2013 at 00:59


Quote: Originally posted by Muffn Man  
Hi Weeksie,

I looked at the parts in the kit and it looks like a nice assortment of goodies for any new lab. What concerns me, though, is that there are no distillation adapters or condensers listed. I think that you would benefit from these items (almost indispensible) . Class B glassware is just not certified as accurate within Class A standards.

For $135 US, you can order from China (if you are so inclined) and get:
1.500ml round bottom flask
2.250ml round bottom flask
3.100ml round bottom flask
4.50ml round bottom flask
5.25ml round bottom flask
6.Thermometer adapter
7.Hollow glass stopper
8.Bleed tube
9.Distillation column,200mm jacket length
10.West condenser,190mm jacket length
11.Separatory funnel,125ml
12.Vaccum take-off adapter
13.Claisen adapter
14.Distillation adapter,75┬░Angle

Look through the Reagents and Apparatus Acquisition forum and you should find a number of suppliers mentioned.


I have found the kit (Laboy) you mention, and have heard mostly good things about them. Thanks for all your advice, everyone, I think I will most probably wait a bit but end up going with the Laboy kit you mention and augmenting it with various other bits of glassware, as I will be able to set up a still rather than just a few flasks. Thanks.
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Muffn Man
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[*] posted on 16-11-2013 at 04:15
Laboy


Their prices are some of the best out there. I have seen suggestions on the forums that you would be better off ordering from Laboy through their eBay store. I ordered some stuff from them through their website, it looks like decent quality. I will echo what others have said and from my personal experience, they were slow to get my stuff shipped. I ended up panicking because I could no longer access their site and opened up a dispute with PayPal. That got their attention and my order was shipped and received within 8 days...
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MichiganMadScientist
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[*] posted on 16-11-2013 at 11:35


If the glassware is of good quality, $136 is not that bad. However, this is a basic glassware kit.

Chemistry is somewhat like a kitchen or woodshop in the sense that what you are going to be able to accomplish will be limited by what you have to work with.

As for the distillation apparatus.........at some point, this will be a must-have item. A good quality distillation setup will allow you to prepare some of your own reagents. Distillation setups are expensive though. Expect to pay at least $100 for quality, mostly-used glassware. And in case it must be mentioned: Retorts don't count.

Here's my First-time Distillation Aparatus Setup Recommendation:

1) Buy the components (eg. condensor, still head, etc) seperately on ebay. If you shop around, you can land these items brand new for good prices. $15-$40 per item if brought brand new. Cheaper if you buy used.

2) If you are going to buy a kit, make sure the glassware is name-brand. Most kits seem to come with Chinex glassware.

3) For fractional distillation, go with a Hemple Column. Avoid the Vigreux Column.

4) For purporses of Reagent production, go with 24/40 Tapered joints. A setup with 14/20 joints will be cheaper, but will not be ideal for producing any large (I call 100ml or more "large") volumes of distillate.

5) Do some SERIOUS self-education of distillation theory. You really need to have an understanding on how the science works to ever be an effective distiller. Ideally, you're a University student who's taken an Organic Chemistry lab class. If not, take the time to read up on distillation theory.
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