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thesmug
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sad.gif posted on 20-2-2014 at 21:10
Breathing difficulties


I have absolutely no idea if I'm posting this in the right place but, for the last few days I've been feeling like I can't breathe normally. I find hit hard to inhale and that I never have enough air in my lungs. The last reaction I did was boiling peracetic acid to form crystals. Strangely, my symptoms really first became noticeable when I started doing some work with the uranium I received in the mail about a day after working with the peracetic acid. It is in ore form and I haven't inhaled any of it as far as I can tell. My order also contained lead sheeting but I dot think that has anything to do with it. I have looked online and it seems that there is a chance I might have contracted chemical pneumonitus. I have never had this happen before and it's extremely distressing. Have any of you ever had this happen?

[edit] I forgot to mention that the peracetic acid was made by mixing 75 ml of 5% acetic acid with 75ml of 3% hydrogen peroxide. I was making copper acetate and boiling the solution to form copper acetate crystals.

[Edited on 2/21/14 by thesmug]
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elementcollector1
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[*] posted on 20-2-2014 at 21:18


Honestly, whatever we tell you here isn't likely to be too helpful. Schedule something with your doctor, maybe?



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thesmug
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[*] posted on 20-2-2014 at 21:20


Quote: Originally posted by elementcollector1  
Honestly, whatever we tell you here isn't likely to be too helpful. Schedule something with your doctor, maybe?


I will if it gets worse but I was more looking to see if anyone else had ever experienced this.
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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 02:13


Your lungs are not to be trifled with ─ get it checked out?

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confused
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 03:05


get it checked out by a qualified medical professional
tell the doctor you're concerns along with anything you might have been exposed to recently.
Do check back to let us know if you're ok

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=23427
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plante1999
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 04:02


I had this fealling quite often in the past, sulphur dioxide, bromine and so on will feal like if the lungs where smalled. Hydrazine and its derivative will do the oposite, at least for me.



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AJKOER
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 05:59


The deepest concern I would have is not with the uranium itself, but any oxide dust from it. Apparently, via the lungs it allows the uranium into your system and can reek havoc with your DNA.

My source, a TV special on one researchers work suggesting that burning uranium forming the oxide dust (from depleted uranium shells used to pierce armor in the Gulf War), indicated that it may be the causative factor in the so-called Gulf war syndrome.

You may need not just a doctor, but a specialist.

Good luck.
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 06:28


AJKOER, please don't post unreferenced speculation that'll only promote chemophobia/radiophobia.

> <em>The pyramids were built by ancient aliens. My source, a TV show.</em>

[sarcasm] Yup, <em>really</em> reputable. [/sarcasm] No fear mongering, please.

thesmug, seek proper medical advice from a licensed physician.




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forgottenpassword
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 06:51


Quote: Originally posted by AJKOER  
The deepest concern I would have is not with the uranium itself, but any oxide dust from it. Apparently, via the lungs it allows the uranium into your system and can reek havoc with your DNA.
That's interesting. Since the patient had been working with strong oxidizing agents before inhaling the uranium dust, is it possible that it would have been rapidly oxidized in vivo, leading to breathing difficulties before full Gulf War syndrome symptoms set in?
Injesting fine particles of an airborne alpha source is probably the worst sort of radioactive substance that you could have ingested. A gamma source would not necessarily interact with your lung tissue, but alpha and beta particles will do massive localized damage wherever the fine suspension of uranium oxide has landed in your lungs.
Hope this helps.
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woelen
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 07:02


If I read what you have been working with, I can hardly imagine that these chemicals can cause problems with your lungs. Just 5% acetic acid and 3% H2O2? In no way can these cause pulmonary edema. Uranium salts also cannot do that.

Your symptoms nearly certainly are caused by something else. Think about what else you have done the last few days and I advice you to go to a doctor and have him/her look at it. This forum is not the place for medical advice, we are no experts!




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The_Davster
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[*] posted on 21-2-2014 at 10:31


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
If I read what you have been working with, I can hardly imagine that these chemicals can cause problems with your lungs. Just 5% acetic acid and 3% H2O2? In no way can these cause pulmonary edema. Uranium salts also cannot do that.

Your symptoms nearly certainly are caused by something else. Think about what else you have done the last few days and I advice you to go to a doctor and have him/her look at it. This forum is not the place for medical advice, we are no experts!


This.

Also, 5% acetic and 3% hydrogen peroxide will contain VERY little actual peracetic. The acetic/H2O2/peracetic equilibrium has water on the product side, and you are so dilute that only traces of peracetic will be present.
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testimento
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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 10:52


I have had this feeling sometimes when I worked with nitric acid and cyanides. I have come into conclusion that it was 50% psychological. I get this sort of feeling when I work with hazardous chemicals, and I'm the guy who wears industrial grade gas mask with just about anything that may cause trouble.. :D
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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 12:45


Quote: Originally posted by testimento  
I have had this feeling sometimes when I worked with nitric acid and cyanides. I have come into conclusion that it was 50% psychological. I get this sort of feeling when I work with hazardous chemicals, and I'm the guy who wears industrial grade gas mask with just about anything that may cause trouble.. :D


You and I are pretty much the same. I wear a gas mask when working with pretty much any powder that might cause damage, even slightly.

[Edited on 2/22/14 by thesmug]
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Zyklon-A
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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 15:01


A gas mask for powder? Do you mean a powder respirator? I guess a gas mask would work for powder too.



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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 17:21


Quote: Originally posted by Zyklonb  
A gas mask for powder? Do you mean a powder respirator? I guess a gas mask would work for powder too.


Powders, gasses, fumes. I mostly work with powders, though.
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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 19:35


Quote: Originally posted by bfesser  
The pyramids were built by ancient aliens. My source, a TV show.</em>[sarcasm] Yup, <em>really</em> reputable.


First it was nanobot powered snowmen. Now Pyramids built by UFO people. Would you quit wrecking everything I learned on cable? You leave me with little left to believe in.

OP go see a doctor. End of story. Panic attacks are far more likely to affect heart rate. Unless you have a history of asthma severe breathing difficulty alone especially without constantly racing thoughts sounds more like a physiological problem that needs to be investigated.


To save making another post I'll add this thought: do you use the same device over and over as breathing protection? Is there a chance it has been damp and growing spore releasing molds? You could get an infection in your breathing passages from this, or constriction from an allergic reaction to them.


[Edited on 2-23-2014 by IrC]




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thesmug
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[*] posted on 22-2-2014 at 21:22


Quote: Originally posted by IrC  
Quote: Originally posted by bfesser  
The pyramids were built by ancient aliens. My source, a TV show.</em>[sarcasm] Yup, <em>really</em> reputable.


First it was nanobot powered snowmen. Now Pyramids built by UFO people. Would you quit wrecking everything I learned on cable? You leave me with little left to believe in.

OP go see a doctor. End of story. Panic attacks are far more likely to affect heart rate. Unless you have a history of asthma severe breathing difficulty alone especially without constantly racing thoughts sounds more like a physiological problem that needs to be investigated.


It seems to have gotten slightly better but is still there. I might have just inhaled an irritant of some sort.
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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 05:53


Or it might just be a touch of pleuritis . . . ?

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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 06:55


i happen to go through the exact thing testimento experiences and do think it is me making myself sick.i even develop OCD similiar to hand washing but it is neutralizing chemicals for disposal in my case.i am terrified that someone will be affected by my carelessness and am always thinking of morbid thoughts and that ruins everything.many things have been instilled in us by the ignorant which by the way clinical studies have tied morbid thoughts and feelings of impending doom with onset of depression.yeah! depressing when ignorant people make the rules and cause paranoia.

[Edited on 2-23-2014 by cyanureeves]
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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 07:16


Uranium can bioaccumulate in bone tissue so I would still see a specialist. The damage to your lungs from inhaling uranium oxide may just be the start of the problems. Uranium has a very long half life so don't assume that just because it has moved from your lungs that you are in the clear.
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thesmug
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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 09:22


Quote: Originally posted by forgottenpassword  
Uranium can bioaccumulate in bone tissue so I would still see a specialist. The damage to your lungs from inhaling uranium oxide may just be the start of the problems. Uranium has a very long half life so don't assume that just because it has moved from your lungs that you are in the clear.

I seriously doubt I inhaled any serious amount of the uranium. The sample I have is a mixture of ores that all together probably only contain maybe a gram or two of uranium (judging by other peoples' calculations). That feeling I get when working with the uranium is most likely just mental.
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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 11:06


Quote: Originally posted by Zyklonb  
A gas mask for powder? Do you mean a powder respirator? I guess a gas mask would work for powder too.


I have high quality industrial multi-layer filter which is rated against "everything" and change battery costs about 20 bucks. This contains filter against solid particles and radioactive material as well. Gas mask is quite useful because it provides full face and breathing protection and suits for any environment.

I once had to handle some hydrogen cyanide in such amounts that I purchased a yellow full body suit, gloves and rubber boots and I taped it airtight with duct tape. :P

[Edited on 23-2-2014 by testimento]
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[*] posted on 23-2-2014 at 13:26


Quote: Originally posted by testimento  
Quote: Originally posted by Zyklonb  
A gas mask for powder? Do you mean a powder respirator? I guess a gas mask would work for powder too.


I have high quality industrial multi-layer filter which is rated against "everything" and change battery costs about 20 bucks. This contains filter against solid particles and radioactive material as well. Gas mask is quite useful because it provides full face and breathing protection and suits for any environment.

I once had to handle some hydrogen cyanide in such amounts that I purchased a yellow full body suit, gloves and rubber boots and I taped it airtight with duct tape. :P

[Edited on 23-2-2014 by testimento]

What kind of gas mask is that!? It seems super expensive!
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