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Author: Subject: Favorite element
OctanitroC
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[*] posted on 18-3-2014 at 17:56


Osmium, Cesium, and Xenon! Heavy stuff, explosive stuff, and bright stuff. I've got a soft spot for heavy elements...



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Bezaleel
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[*] posted on 19-3-2014 at 09:09


Molybdenum. I love the large variety of structures it can build.
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[*] posted on 19-3-2014 at 11:43


Quote: Originally posted by Bezaleel  
Molybdenum. I love the large variety of structures it can build.


Oh yeah, this guy gets it.

Holy molybdenum Batman!




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-Johann Joachim Becher
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[*] posted on 20-3-2014 at 16:36


Americium.
USA! USA!

Nah, just kidding. Though it is somewhat special to me, as I chose to make a model of it in 7th grade when everyone had to make a 3-D Bohr model for a project. I chose it because it's the biggest one that still has a practical everyday use (smoke detectors).
Really though I haven't picked a favorite. The periodic table is such a wonderful place with so many unique characters that as soon as I feel like I have a favorite element another one takes its place!
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copperastic
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[*] posted on 20-3-2014 at 16:42


zts16 that happens to me too (were you pick one for your favorite then you like another one).



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[*] posted on 21-3-2014 at 03:18


Gold. But I also like mercury because it can dissolve Gold
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[*] posted on 22-3-2014 at 19:34


Wow GoldGuy, I never would have guessed! (:
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[*] posted on 22-3-2014 at 19:45


All the Halides, but my favorites in-compound are Iron and Copper, so versatile!
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Chemistry_Keegan
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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 07:48


One element that consistently stays one of my favourites is osmium. It's the densest element, being almost two times denser than lead, and it's a blue metal, which is just flat out awesome. It's tetroxide is also a pretty transparent greenish colour, but it's ridiculously toxic. Oh well, osmium is still amazing :D
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Zyklon-A
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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 08:46


I thought that only osmium tetroxide is toxic, and because osmium forms the tetroxide in air, it is always toxic.



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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 09:11


No, the tetroxide only forms in air when the osmium is a finely divided powder. If you have a nice chunk of it it's perfectly harmless. (I would love to have a nice chunk of osmium… that would be really cool)
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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 12:46


Osmium awesomeness:



Heating osmium chunks to 400 degrees C will cause them to start producing the tetroxide. The tetroxide is yellowish because some is reduced back to osmium dioxide.

Silicon is a pretty cool element - it's so light and shiny. It would probably be good for jewelry, but it's too brittle. I'd also like some indium, that way I could bend and scratch metal with my bare hands. Or some europium for its fluorescence: red in the trivalent state, blue in the divalent state. Or some rhodium - because it's rare and I could sell it for a big profit. :P




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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 13:57


Hmmm..

Carbon, bismuth, and silicon. I'm sure this will end up changing eventually but I think carbon will always be my number 1.

Love the way those osmium crystals look. Shame about osmium compounds toxicity I'd love to acquire some of the raw element for a collection.




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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 13:58


Quote: Originally posted by Brain&Force  
Osmium awesomeness:




Alright, I will admit that those are beautiful crystals. But I'll take rhodium, iridium, ruthenium, or even rusty iron over osmium any day.





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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 14:10


Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  





Alright, I will admit that those are beautiful crystals. But I'll take rhodium, iridium, ruthenium, or even rusty iron over osmium any day.


Rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium I can understand. But rusty iron?? Why?

[Edited on 23-3-2014 by Zyklonb]




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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 14:19


Bismuth. I think this was always a foregone conclusion.

Although, rusty iron is also nice.
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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 15:25


Aw man I completely forgot about bismuth. Hopper crystals are awesome. I read that if you leave the iridescent crystals in nitric acid, the iridescent layer disappears. A tin impurity will prevent it from forming at all.

Anyone know any brands of fishing weights that contain bismuth?




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[*] posted on 23-3-2014 at 16:17


Quote: Originally posted by Brain&Force  
Aw man I completely forgot about bismuth. Hopper crystals are awesome. I read that if you leave the iridescent crystals in nitric acid, the iridescent layer disappears. A tin impurity will prevent it from forming at all.

Anyone know any brands of fishing weights that contain bismuth?

Almost all of the "Bio Friendly" ones do.
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[*] posted on 24-3-2014 at 15:14


Gotta go with the big W. It stay's cool no matter how hot it gets.:cool:
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[*] posted on 24-3-2014 at 15:20


Haha, so very true
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smile.gif posted on 24-3-2014 at 20:00
Most all of them...


Sorry, I just can't choose a favorite. I like most all of them for various reasons. Whether it's the super reactivity of F or the inertness of Xe, the rarity of Pt/Au/Pd, the toughness of the transition metals (in alloys), and the uniqueness of just about every one I can see on the periodic chart. Can't say I know much about elements with atomic numbers 105 and up, but when I looked at the chart as a kid they weren't there, so they are all the more mysterious. Nope, can't decide on a favorite, too many lovely elements!



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[*] posted on 25-3-2014 at 03:45


Xe is not inert.

Quote:
Although generally unreactive, xenon can undergo a few chemical reactions such as the formation of xenon hexafluoroplatinate, the first noble gas compound to be synthesized.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon




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[*] posted on 25-3-2014 at 19:41


Everything is relative. Xe is relatively inert, just as I would refer to other noble gases and some elements as "inert". N2 is relatively inert, but there are many N compounds. I had watched that neat old video posted by plante1999 on Xe reactivity before I posted, so I knew some Xe compounds could be formed when I referred to it as inert.

But I still can't decide on a favorite. Maybe silver, iodine, strontium, chlorine, and of course xenon would be near the top of my list.




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[*] posted on 26-3-2014 at 05:53


Quote: Originally posted by Xenon1898  
Everything is relative. Xe is relatively inert, just as I would refer to other noble gases and some elements as "inert". N2 is relatively inert, but there are many N compounds. I had watched that neat old video posted by plante1999 on Xe reactivity before I posted, so I knew some Xe compounds could be formed when I referred to it as inert.

But I still can't decide on a favorite. Maybe silver, iodine, strontium, chlorine, and of course xenon would be near the top of my list.


You tell 'em :)
Yea, strontium is probably one of my favorites too Strontium nitrate was the first oddball chemical I ever got, which triggered me buying way too much barium nitrate later on in life (I hate having large quantities of poisons).




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[*] posted on 26-3-2014 at 06:06


Flourine, because it steals every electron it wants. :cool:



fluorine.jpg - 15kB




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