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Author: Subject: Manganese Dioxide from Manganese Sulfate
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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 06:13


Well, if you only use unused batteries, then you get only MnO2, and from there it's simple to clean. I didn't even bother burning off the graphite for what I was doing, because it remained unreacted in the reaction and was easily filterable afterwards.

Afterwards I removed the iron using the hydroxide method mentioned in the Manganese Chloride Crystals thread and used by NurdRage. My end goal was to isolate manganese, and it seemed to work very well. There is no doubt that there was still some iron left, but that doesn't really bother me a whole lot.

[Edited on 5-11-2014 by zts16]
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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 08:13


It is indeed pretty hard to purify and clean-up MnO2 from batteries, it's a mess from beginning to end, but my favorite trick (as mentioned above) is that after extracting Zinc-Carbon battery material, thoroughly rinse the black paste to remove soluble Zinc salts, then mix with hydrochloric acid to make some MnCl2. Lots of nasty gases will be emitted, beware!

Filter the stuff to remove the remaining insoluble impurities, you'll get a dark tea-colored solution, that you can reduce a bit with gentle heating (it will actually get lighter in color), and and when it starts crystallizing, you'll have a fairly clean Mn salt, from which you can make whatever you need.

Even then there are probably still trace impurities of zinc and iron, but it's okay for most purposes...

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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 09:10


Quote: Originally posted by zts16  
Well, if you only use unused batteries, then you get only MnO2, and from there it's simple to clean. I didn't even bother burning off the graphite for what I was doing, because it remained unreacted in the reaction and was easily filterable afterwards.

Afterwards I removed the iron using the hydroxide method mentioned in the Manganese Chloride Crystals thread and used by NurdRage. My end goal was to isolate manganese, and it seemed to work very well. There is no doubt that there was still some iron left, but that doesn't really bother me a whole lot.

[Edited on 5-11-2014 by zts16]


If you're going to dissolve the Mn oxide (to remove the iron), then it doesn't matter one iota whether you start from MnO2 or Mn2O3 because the latter is reduced to Mn(II) anyway, just as MnO2. Might as well use spent batteries, in that case...




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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 09:55


Why not Mn2O3 from percarbonate?

I don't see any reason to slap down battery MnO2 users...it really isn't a big deal to dissolve and convert to CMD, and the mess is limited when most everything is done under water with gloves...and, I doubt much Fe is found in batteries these days as I've said before, certainly not alkaline batteries. With zinc batteries, you get bonus zinc to melt down, and the rods I guess if anyone has found them useful...
http://www.tronox.com/products/electrolytic-manganese-dioxid...




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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 10:03


Mn2O3 from percarbonate? Explain.

There's no 'slapping down' here.

MnO2 and Mn(II) salts are very cheap and not hard to get. Messing with batteries can be fun but hardly economical. Or easy, if you want a decent end product. Many battery peddlers are happy when it's black and tests positive for Mn. But that's too easy.

CMD? What's that?

Under water? Separating the graphite out 100 % is not easy and seriously messy.

Iron: I bet $100 (easy) that I'll find significant amounts of Fe in any randomly selected non-alkaline battery electrolyte. It's always been the outcome in my case.

[Edited on 11-5-2014 by blogfast25]

[Edited on 11-5-2014 by blogfast25]




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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 10:34


Why not Mn2O3? Explain.

Separation of the solution from graphite is achieved by the high-tech method of decantation. Things may be possible that you aren't aware of.

I'd add (again) that the zinc in certain brands of new alkaline batteries will give shiny zinc powder with minimal washing, though others disagree with that too.

What's CMD? Well, the MD is MnO2...
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=26790&...

[Edited on 11-5-2014 by S.C. Wack]




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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 10:39


Quote: Originally posted by S.C. Wack  
Why not Mn2O3? Explain.

Separation of the solution from graphite is achieved by the high-tech method of decantation. Things may be possible that you aren't aware of.



Stop trying to read my mind. Yes, I'm aware of various methods of floatation/decantation than can be used to separate graphite from something else. Do you think any of the battery cutters here have actually tried them? High tech methods?

Now kindly tell me about the connection between Mn2O3 and percarbonate, because that I don't see.

Yes, MD for manganese dioxide. E for electrolytic. C for ? Aaahh, chemical, got it. But ammonium peroxodisulphate? Don't make me giggle.


[Edited on 11-5-2014 by blogfast25]




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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 14:53


Ok so this may be a stupid question, but could one remove iron and zinc from the battery mixture by treating it with sulphuric acid and filtering it?



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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 14:57


Of course much more easier and economical way is to obtain directly the MnO2/MnSO4 from a chemical supply store.

MnSO4 can be mixed with ammonium sulfate and 60% H2SO4, then electrolysed to (III) oxidation state to produce benzaldehyde from toluene. (Hilski's thread: http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=6882 )

Or MnSO4 can be converted to the carbonate and then to manganese(II) acetate, which on oxidation will give the more precious manganese(III) acetate for small scale production of P2P from benzene (Leukemia) and acetone :)
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[*] posted on 11-5-2014 at 16:49


Quote: Originally posted by blogfast25  
C for ? Aaahh, chemical, got it. But ammonium peroxodisulphate? Don't make me giggle.


You not knowing CMD was giggly...I found their whole process and the claim of a particularly active product interesting. Ammonium persulfate is $26.09 a kilo to your door here. Everyone knows about using KMnO4 instead already.

Those interested in organic oxidations are more interested in CMD than the cheap product sold by pottery suppliers.




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[*] posted on 12-5-2014 at 04:43


Quote: Originally posted by S.C. Wack  
You not knowing CMD was giggly...I found their whole process and the claim of a particularly active product interesting. Ammonium persulfate is $26.09 a kilo to your door here. Everyone knows about using KMnO4 instead already.

Those interested in organic oxidations are more interested in CMD than the cheap product sold by pottery suppliers.


Using abbreviations and then giggling at those who don't know them is silly.

There is no a priori reason to suspect that other oxidisers will yield a less active product, for organic oxidations or for whatnot. At that price of oxidiser reclaiming MnO2 from spent batteries can not be economical at all. Form what I understand from a company that produces spent battery electrolyte, finding an economical end use for it is a big problem.

High grade MnO2 ('CMD' or 'EMD' to use your false dichotomy) is inexpensive too.

And I still don't know anything about Mn2O3 and percarbonate... Oh well.

[Edited on 12-5-2014 by blogfast25]




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