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Author: Subject: What is your personal way of storing (short term/long term) and transporting your glassware?
Electra
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[*] posted on 20-5-2014 at 20:48
What is your personal way of storing (short term/long term) and transporting your glassware?


I've thought about this for some time and the only practical yet safe option I can think of is each larger piece having it's own box with padding, and just praying the box doesn't get crushed, but even this is impractical for short term storage, as unpacking everything is a hassle. In any lab scenario I would constantly be looking for some part that is packed away.

Having lab equipment laying around in the open would work but then there runs the risk of the accidental stumble causing much shattering chaos. What do you all suggest? I don't have a whole lot of glassware, but I don't have a small amount either. It could all maybe fit in the back seat of a car if boxed up carefully, yet compactly.

The first time I went to my lab partners house to see their personal lab, I cringed when I saw they kept over 8 different pieces of sensitive glassware all in the same box with no padding between them, condensers, flasks, separatory funnels. And, there were multiple boxes like this. Nothing ever broke, that I know of, at most if the box is handled correctly it makes the classic glass-on-glass noise... but this is far too risky of an option for me. I don't have money to throw around to replace broken glass ware so easily.
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Crowfjord
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[*] posted on 20-5-2014 at 21:33


I store mine similarly to your friend, with my distillation pieces and most of my round bottom flasks, tubing and adapters in the same box. The top and bottom are padded with plastic bags filled with shredded paper, and some pieces are padded from one another with cotton wool that I keep for fractionation insulation. The rest of my glassware is variably distributed in other boxes.

For transport (a rare occasion), glass pieces are more carefully packed in boxes with plenty of wadded newspaper for padding.

Eventually, I want to get one or two or three large hard-shelled suitcases, which I will line with foam padding. A second layer of foam with cut-outs in the shape of the pieces to be held will go inside the first. This would essentially be a homemade recreation of the cases for the glassware kits we had in college o-chem lab, but larger. Someday...


[Edited on 21-5-2014 by Crowfjord]
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prof_genius
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[*] posted on 20-5-2014 at 21:34


I have a plastic box that I can put in the car for transportation. I recommend you get some shelving for your glass. If you're worried that the glass will fall pick up some of those elastic bungee cords and attach them to the shelving, that will keep the glass from falling and I have seen it in use at a professional lab in an earthquake prone area to stop the glass from falling.
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Electra
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[*] posted on 21-5-2014 at 08:09


Quote: Originally posted by Crowfjord  
I store mine similarly to your friend, with my distillation pieces and most of my round bottom flasks, tubing and adapters in the same box. The top and bottom are padded with plastic bags filled with shredded paper, and some pieces are padded from one another with cotton wool that I keep for fractionation insulation. The rest of my glassware is variably distributed in other boxes.

For transport (a rare occasion), glass pieces are more carefully packed in boxes with plenty of wadded newspaper for padding.

Eventually, I want to get one or two or three large hard-shelled suitcases, which I will line with foam padding. A second layer of foam with cut-outs in the shape of the pieces to be held will go inside the first. This would essentially be a homemade recreation of the cases for the glassware kits we had in college o-chem lab, but larger. Someday...


[Edited on 21-5-2014 by Crowfjord]


I have one of those foam cases for that reason. It was a waste of money. I thought I could fit way more glassware in their than I was able to. I fit maybe 10 pieces of small 500ml-1000ml glass ware in there, with a few condensers and fractionating columns, and the entire thing is barely able to fit into the back seat of my car.

Quote: Originally posted by prof_genius  
I have a plastic box that I can put in the car for transportation. I recommend you get some shelving for your glass. If you're worried that the glass will fall pick up some of those elastic bungee cords and attach them to the shelving, that will keep the glass from falling and I have seen it in use at a professional lab in an earthquake prone area to stop the glass from falling.


Good thought. It might be nifty to modify some storage bins with some of those so the glass can be stored in there securely, without it touching, and without the need for a ton of foam. I'm sure it wouldn't be too difficult to create a secure electric type pouch for each piece of sensitive glass. A little bit of stitching and it could turn into a cool little project.
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DrAldehyde
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[*] posted on 21-5-2014 at 08:22


I won a large glass lot at an auction. I had to move it a couple hundred miles at a moments notice. I bought a couple of packs of cotton shop towels from Costco and a dozen plastic containers with built in lids, also from Costco. I wrapped each piece in a towel and nested them when I could. Then packed them in the boxes. The towels are pretty inexpensive, reusable, and much easier to use and offer better protection than paper. Everything made the trip.
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Muffn Man
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[*] posted on 21-5-2014 at 08:22
Foam drawer liner


I saw this and thought that it was a great idea. Make a drawer liner/tray from an old T-shirt and some spray foam. Worth a look.

http://www.howtogeek.com/news/create-custom-tool-drawer-line...
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Rogeryermaw
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[*] posted on 21-5-2014 at 09:12


Quote: Originally posted by Muffn Man  
I saw this and thought that it was a great idea. Make a drawer liner/tray from an old T-shirt and some spray foam. Worth a look.

http://www.howtogeek.com/news/create-custom-tool-drawer-line...


that looks pretty cool but i wouldn't use it for glassware. if it's a tight fit, the foam may crack fragile pieces as it expands. also, if you form it around round parts, you may have to cut them out after the foam sets.

a couple of years ago one could practically choke on the sheer quantity of distillation sets available on ebay that came with the foam lined cases. now, i can't find them. at least not on ebay anymore.
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[*] posted on 22-5-2014 at 15:56


At home, I have all of my glassware in a large cabinet, and I keep my condenser and other fragile pieces wrapped in bubble wrap when I'm not using them. I've never had to transport anything, other than a few tiny little volumetric flasks, but I'd probably use plastic bins with a lot of padding, as some of you have already described, if I needed to transport more of my stuff.
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Oscilllator
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[*] posted on 22-5-2014 at 16:50


I got a large foam mattress and a flat storage box (about 1.2x0.6x0.2m) and filled it with foam. I then cut holes in the foam mattress with a knife so that my glassware fits in there. With careful arrangement you can fit a decent amount of glassware in there



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Rogeryermaw
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[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 06:41


http://www.specialized.net/Specialized/Blow-Molded-Case-FULL...

may have to get a couple of these
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