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Author: Subject: Mystery Glassware Identification Thread
S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 25-8-2021 at 13:46


It's a Gooch crucible, and as with cheap Buchners, the Coors version has smaller, nicer holes.



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[*] posted on 17-9-2021 at 07:00


Konduktor,

I guess those glass tubes could be older drying tubes, to be filled with drying media and dry air or gas or protecting a reaction from moisture.
Or maybe some small chromatography columns for separating compounds with silica.

Somebody else know what Konduktor´s tubes could be?
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[*] posted on 20-9-2021 at 18:23


Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  
Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
I don't know what it is but I want one!

I think that it is a part of this apparatus https://youtu.be/fMwFxUQx1PI


Well I'd buy one as long as it makes that sound.


wait till you you hear it in active operation :o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1R8Rx2db9c

We have a couple of pieces like this at work, where there is a sort of drain at the bottom of the container (a barbed hose adaptor for the erlenmeyer flask; a ground glass taper on the other bottle). Not sure, maybe they're tissue culture equipment?

what_is_this_glassware2.jpg - 139kB

Picked this up at the really free market, rather baffled. a decanter that you can add ice to without watering down your wine? A decoration? what???

what_is_this_glassware.jpg - 96kB




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[*] posted on 23-9-2021 at 18:35


I have seen the flasks with two inlet/outlets used as vacuum traps for aspirators, you hook the bottom one to the aspirator, and then the top one to the vacuum line to your experiment, then if water gets in the trap, it is sucked out later and does not get into the lines. But I am sure thet can be used for other uses as well.
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[*] posted on 10-10-2021 at 09:20


Hi guys, I've bought a bulk of glass and one piece which I saw only on a picture mixed with other glass together looked like a condenser, but when I received it and was able to saw it finally it looked like an apparatus for a gas reaction. But the one part is filled with long glass tubes so when thinking further I had an idea that gasses mix well and these tubes are there probably for some liquid so maybe the apparatus is for performing liquid-gas reaction and the tubes just increase the surface of the reaction?
Do you have any suggestion for any reaction which I could perform in the apparatus? I have never did any gas-gas reaction (burning gases in air does not count) and only few times gas-liquid reaction (like addition of hydrogen chloride gas to alfa pinene and absorption of ammonia gas in ethanol using a washing bottle with a sinter on the end of bubbling tube to make smaller bubbles and increase the reaction surface).
Or is it for a gas-gas reaction which produces some liquid?
If feeding the gas through the stopcock I assume the apparatus is positioned like shown in the attached pictures, when feeding through the open joint I assume using some PTFE stopper with a hole through which a gas is fed into the apparatus and the position of the apparatus has to be swapped upside-down?
There are also 2 choices how to feed the gas, under pressure (I suppose) or using sucking through the second opening (less probable)?

IMG_20211010_183908_9_sm.jpg - 32kB IMG_20211010_183925_3_sm.jpg - 29kB




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Ormarion
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[*] posted on 11-11-2021 at 12:28


Hello everyone i hope you are doing great, a friend of me recently found this nice piece of glassware in a old lab, look like some sort of weird extractor, any idea what it is?

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VbGKoDBDIp6ImDMw-7mx...

you can see the pics there

There is also a weird metal vessel linked
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DraconicAcid
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[*] posted on 19-11-2021 at 11:06


This has been hanging around our lab for a while, and my colleague asked me what it was for. I suddenly realized that I didn't actually know.

glassware1.jpg - 1.1MB

ETA: The graduations are not total volume- at the bottom, they start at 1.

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by DraconicAcid]




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SWIM
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[*] posted on 19-11-2021 at 12:06


It's a Babcock bottle.
https://wi101.wisc.edu/2013/12/01/how-does-a-babcock-tester-...

The bulb in the middle threw me off at first as I'd never seen one like that.

For determining cream content I think, but I freely admit I'm too lazy to read the article I linked and am relying on memory.

Edit: So after posting I did read the article.
Looks like you need a centrifuge for those bottles.

Edit: @Mayko: I suspect the third picture may be an oil and vinegar bottle. (A cruet set?)
These come in many different forms, all having one bottle inside the other but differing shapes.
They turn up on Ebay in the labware section now and then.

A dangerous situation since they're probably not suitable for lab use.

Edit: Yup:

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by SWIM]

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by SWIM]

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by SWIM]

labcruet.jpg - 3kB

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by SWIM]

babcockwhirler.jpg - 329kB

[Edited on 19-11-2021 by SWIM]




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[*] posted on 19-11-2021 at 12:27


Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  
It's a Babcock bottle.
https://wi101.wisc.edu/2013/12/01/how-does-a-babcock-tester-...

The bulb in the middle threw me off at first as I'd never seen one like that.


Thanks!




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CarlSagans_RayGuns
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[*] posted on 19-11-2021 at 12:33


This is my favorite thread :)
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[*] posted on 28-12-2021 at 15:36


Fery, that is a part of a gas analysis box, a portable thing that was carried around from gas well to gas well, or from plant to plant to analyze natural gas for different components such as H2S, CO2, some were configured as flue gas analyzers, etc. The ones I’ve seen were made by Burrell, and you can find pictures of them online. I used to have one of those pieces you show, but I broke it trying to clean it up. I’ve got some other pieces from a Burrell analyzer, one called a bubbler. It has a little ground glass ball check valve built into it. Kinda cool, but can’t think of any other use for it.



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[*] posted on 28-12-2021 at 23:21


charley1957 thank you very much !!!



If there is a heaven, it seems not to be materially based. Does chemistry exist there and if yes, how does it look like? Are there good souls well supplied with laboratory equipment, glass, chemicals and information?
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[*] posted on 31-3-2022 at 15:04


So I have this second-hand store in my city which basically gets free material that is not used anymore (by companies for example) and then resells it for pretty cheap. To my surprise they also have quite a big area dedicated to lab-equipment, mainly glassware.
I recently went there and picked up this interesting piece of ground joint glassware and would like to know what it is used for (if anyone here knows).

I am going to try to explain how it's built as best as I can.
So there is 2 Hose adapters. The upper one is leading to the upper chamber which is connected with the middle chamber via a glass tube thats open on the bottom. Under the middle chamber there is a solid glass plate so no connection to the lower chamber (where the ground joint is). But then at the same time the upper chamber is connected to the lower chamber via this glass tube at the outside.

I am really confused since I could not imagine a single possible use for it. Thanks for any help in advance :D

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[*] posted on 17-4-2022 at 09:38
"Continuous flow separator addition funnel drain reactor USA custom airlfree USA"


Anyone have any idea what this thing is actually used for?


The description makes it clear that the seller isn't entirely sure what it's used for either.
Quote:
Custom lab glassware- Not sure if this is a airfree reactor or a continuous separator, but made in USA by SLA (Southeastern Laboratory Apparatus). about 16-inches long with top, top has two ports one with stopcock. Top is removable has ground glass joint approx 60/50, No cracks, no chips ,very good condition. Also has 4 dimples for suspending a screen or packing? or maybe to break up flow? Side port points downward toward stopcock and has a dome over it. assume this is for collecting and holding a lighter fraction liquid or gas to be drawn off.



If I had to guess, I would say maybe it's meant to allow you to bubble gas through a solution from the bottom port, but catch the unreacted gas from the inverted funnel to allow you to recirculate it to optimize the gas absorption - But that doesn't explain what the little indentations above the funnel are for (maybe to hold something in place above the reaction?) or what the stopcock on the top is used for.

Edit: I actually meant to post this in the Mystery Glassware Identification Thread thread. I was drafting it on here, then remembered about that thread and copy/pasted the content into there... But apparently I got distracted and hit submit on the wrong tab >_< Sorry.

[Edited on 17-4-2022 by SuperOxide]
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[*] posted on 17-4-2022 at 20:49


Placerminer is a good guy and often has great deals, but he's often shaky on just what the stuff he's selling is for.

I suspect the gas, if it is a gas bubbler, goes in the side port as this ensures lots of gas to liquid interface.

I think he's got a point about those dimples though. They do look like they would be to suspend a Soxhlet thimble or other filter in there.

I don't really know, but wanted to put in a good word for the seller, who sent me many good things over the years for fair to excellent prices.




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[*] posted on 19-4-2022 at 05:53


Does somebody know what the upper part of this beautiful piece of glassware look like? It should be a part of a column head, probably one that has a magnet controlled reflux or something like that. It's made by the former German glassware manufacture "Normschliff Gerätebau Wertheim". I would love to have the counterpart, maybe someone can help me with that?

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[*] posted on 3-5-2022 at 15:31


Quote: Originally posted by kweiny  
So I have this second-hand store in my city which basically gets free material that is not used anymore (by companies for example) and then resells it for pretty cheap. To my surprise they also have quite a big area dedicated to lab-equipment, mainly glassware.
I recently went there and picked up this interesting piece of ground joint glassware and would like to know what it is used for (if anyone here knows).

I am going to try to explain how it's built as best as I can.
So there is 2 Hose adapters. The upper one is leading to the upper chamber which is connected with the middle chamber via a glass tube thats open on the bottom. Under the middle chamber there is a solid glass plate so no connection to the lower chamber (where the ground joint is). But then at the same time the upper chamber is connected to the lower chamber via this glass tube at the outside.

I am really confused since I could not imagine a single possible use for it. Thanks for any help in advance :D


It looks like it might function to maintain an inert atmosphere at just slightly above atmospheric pressure in a reaction flask.

(Based on an appearance of similarity of function to an inert gas bubbler linked to in a recent thread about LAH reductions By Cooper_Panda.)

This is a guess.




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[*] posted on 4-5-2022 at 02:15


Quote: Originally posted by SWIM  

It looks like it might function to maintain an inert atmosphere at just slightly above atmospheric pressure in a reaction flask.


Hi! First of all thanks, that's what I thought too but I couldn't explain how exactly it works.
Do you think the middle chamber (with the glass rod) is filled with oil and then acts like a bubbler, venting the excess inert gas to the atmosphere, while the upper hose connector is used as a second inert gas inlet?

I may be going a little offtopic, but some time ago I read that some systems use 2 inert gas inlets but I don't understand why. Could you elaborate?


Cheers
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[*] posted on 4-5-2022 at 18:49


I think you are right about how this works, but I have no experience with this kind of equipment and I am not sure I am right.

But it does look like inert gas pumped in at the top fitting could pressurize the flask to just enough pressure to let the excess gas out through the bubbler.
And yes, I am assuming the lower chamber would have oil in it and act as a bubbler.

So the pressure would be equal to that necessary to force the gas out through the bubbler and no more.

I have no personal experience working with inert gas systems like this so I'm afraid I can't be of much help as to how they are used.

Sorry I can't be of more help.




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[*] posted on 20-7-2022 at 10:47


A friend ask me what is these ... i have no idea xP

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VeritasC&E
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[*] posted on 4-8-2022 at 14:14



I can't figure out what this is: A sort of distillate separation stage for higher boiling fraction?

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[*] posted on 4-8-2022 at 14:22


Quote: Originally posted by Chem Science  
A friend ask me what is these ... i have no idea xP



It's hard to see on the picture, but where does the small coil go to? And does the big tube really just go straight up?

It almost looks like it's not even meant for chemistry and a part of it is just decorative while the other part sends steam up to the small glass holder (as using steam as a carrier to disperse molecules from what's in the holder, such as aromatic plants, into the local atmosphere).

Ok, my imagination is going a bit far. Probably one of the many many pieces of glassware I know nothing about...
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[*] posted on 4-8-2022 at 14:30


Quote: Originally posted by electrokinetic  
I recently received a rather large treasure trove of glassware from a friend who is a chem professor. Incredibly, he found all of it in or by the dumpster when he was leaving work!!!

This piece is stuck to the top of a Vigreux column. My friend had no idea what it was other than the obvious: it was part of a distillation setup. I have searched google, and posted it on another forum. Someone finally suggested that it is probably a distillation splash head, and I think he's probably right, but I thought I'd post it here and see what the community here says. After all, as the someone also pointed out, if it is a splash head it would be pretty pointless at the top of a fractionating column.



[Edited on 1-13-2016 by zts16]



Yes and no. It may be very useful up there for when initially tweaking your reflux ratio (sort of allows you to warm up the column very fast without getting a bunch of lower BP fractions in your receiver because the column isn't in proper equilibrium yet: once stuff shoots out up there you turn things a bit down to let the column equilibrate and all the lower BP stuff from what shot out from the top just goes back into the column to slowly get back down to the still).
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[*] posted on 7-8-2022 at 08:36


Quote: Originally posted by VeritasC&E  

I can't figure out what this is: A sort of distillate separation stage for higher boiling fraction?


Or could it be a sort of splash-head?

Whatever it is, it looks completely incomprehensible to me. Let alone it being so big.

[Edited on 7-8-2022 by VeritasC&E]
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