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Author: Subject: Mystery Glassware Identification Thread
Dr.Bob
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 18:51


The spring barbs are for holding two pieces tightly together with a small spring (usually 2 or 3 of them around the joint). This was done before Keck clips existed, and is still used in some cases, especially when heating the glassware, as keck's melt easily.

#6 could also be used as a vacuum trap for use with an aspiraor, such that the vacuum hose from the aspirator connects to the inlet tube, which can suck up any water that gets in the trap, and a stopper with a short tube is put in the top, so that it does not pull any water back in case the vacuum weakens. Water aspirators often change the vacuum they pull based on water temp and pressure, and they can sometimes pull water back from the pipe, so using a trap is a good idea. Most people just use a filter flask, but that would work better.
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[*] posted on 5-9-2014 at 17:51


Anybody have any idea what this is? They are all over ebay..think I just bought 6 for $20...


image.jpg - 44kB

Thanks




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[*] posted on 5-9-2014 at 20:23


Quote: Originally posted by NOV:5  
Anybody have any idea what this is? They are all over ebay..think I just bought 6 for $20.


"They are all over ebay"? I searched for "chemistry glassware" in 'Healthcare, Lab & Life Science'. 305 hits, I looked at the images of the auction for all 305. Not one had your item. Can you provide a specific link so we can see?




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[*] posted on 6-9-2014 at 16:27


Well there is the one I posted item #301294363497
The one I bought, item #121420981364
One I was watching, item #121396976090
And I've seen several as part of lots...you might try searching "vintage lab glassware" or some variant with " lot" included as a term. The pic I posted has a clear image of the device, and the helical copper strip is visible...I'd just like to know what they are..

EDIT:
The items I bought include a stopper and short curved tube in the empty side, like it was intended as a gas discharge...

[Edited on 7-9-2014 by NOV:5]




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amazingchemistry
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[*] posted on 21-10-2014 at 22:20
Need help identifying mystery glassware


Hello,
I was doing some inventory at school and found the following pieces of glassware. I have no idea what they are and would appreciate any help figuring that out.

[Edited on 22-10-2014 by amazingchemistry]

20141016_155535.jpg - 2.2MB20141016_155321.jpg - 2.2MB20141021_133946.jpg - 2.1MB20141016_155535.jpg - 2.2MB20141016_155321.jpg - 2.2MB20141021_133946.jpg - 2.1MB20141021_160558.jpg - 1.5MB20141021_165025.jpg - 1.4MB




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[*] posted on 21-10-2014 at 23:01


Here are some more

20141016_110631.jpg - 1.6MB 20141021_165533.jpg - 2MB 20141021_165554.jpg - 2MB 20141021_165652.jpg - 1.6MB 20141021_170014.jpg - 1.6MB 20141021_170401.jpg - 1.2MB 20141021_170852.jpg - 1.4MB




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[*] posted on 21-10-2014 at 23:07


The first one looks like a fractional distillation reflux splitting head. The two bulbs with stopcocks on each end are calibrated gas bulbs, used for charging known volumes of gaseous components to reactions. Not sure about the third item, but the last one looks like a gas washing assembly (dreschel bottles are more common but for bubbling through sulfuric acid or mercury the smaller volume would be advantageous.
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[*] posted on 21-10-2014 at 23:13


Second set of pictures: the first one looks to be a levelling bulb for a gas burette. The second and third is a right angled high vacuum tap, and fourth is a double oblique high vacuum tap. 5 is a gas washing bottle (dreschel), 6 is a vacuum dewar flask that is yet to be silvered, evacuated and sealed. 7 is a guard tube/"calcium chloride tube"
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[*] posted on 22-10-2014 at 04:23


I tried long ago to see if anyone knew what this was. I still don't know so here it is again. Maybe a newer member knows.


1.JPG - 42kB 2.jpg - 49kB 3.jpg - 42kB

Forgot to mention but the 2 ports left, center connect through the center metal portion. Sealed away from inside it appears like a cooling liquid inlet/outlet. The right port allows one to evacuate or fill the inside portion of the glass housing.


[Edited on 10-22-2014 by IrC]




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[*] posted on 22-10-2014 at 07:11


I could not believe my eyes when I saw this apparatus in an old Ind Eng Chem paper (I was browsing online)!

Attachment: Wiley extraction apparatus.pdf (346kB)
This file has been downloaded 556 times

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[*] posted on 22-10-2014 at 09:52


Thank you so very much DJF90!! The third item of the first set seems to be some sort of adapter, the inlet/ outlet obviously connects to a hose of Some kind. I dont know about the fourth item on the first set though. Seems like the dreschel bottles are able to stand on their own, whereas this is not (the "bottom" is rounded, like a test tube's). Would this matter? Am I wrong in a assuming that those two pieces of glassware even go together? I found them in a box, sort of jumbled , so I don't know. For the second set, I have my doubts about the Dewar flask being a Dewar flask, as all other items on the set seem to relate to gas chemistry somehow.



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[*] posted on 22-10-2014 at 11:18


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
I could not believe my eyes when I saw this apparatus in an old Ind Eng Chem paper (I was browsing online)!


Thanks. Now that I know the name I found all kinds of information on it. No idea what I will do with it but at least the mystery is gone.




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[*] posted on 23-10-2014 at 13:13


The first set of pictures, bottom left is a vacuum desiccator vacuum inlet. It sits on top of the lid and can be turned to pull a vacuum, then turned to seal it. Just replaced one of those today, so it jumped out at me.
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[*] posted on 23-10-2014 at 14:45


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
The two bulbs with stopcocks on each end are calibrated gas bulbs, used for charging known volumes of gaseous components to reactions


I have several of these and I have been told they are also used as gas collection bulbs. I bought them years ago to collect Deuterium gas from heavy water and Lithium metal. My goal was dual as I also wanted the Deuteride but never built the setup to react Li at 600C with D2. I did collect the LiOD, Lithium deuteroxide but have never found anything of interest to do with it other than coating the inside of 2 Be half spheres (parts of a very high speed gyro) with Am241 inside in experiments building Neutron sources to test my detectors with. The bulbs with stopcocks worked very well collecting D2 and allowing it to be used in experiments.

I still have no clue what to use the Wiley extraction apparatus for other than something odd to look cool on the shelf.




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[*] posted on 23-10-2014 at 19:23


Thank you very much Dr. Bob. Now I know what most of these are =)



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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 12:27
More mystery glassware


Sorry for relying too much on you guys, but, having never worked with anything other than simple organic an inorganic glassware I'm at a loss as to what these are and don't really even know how to start looking. I will post guesses for the items I can guess at. Thank you very much.

20141028_144645.jpg - 2.1MB20141028_144556.jpg - 1.5MB20141028_144423.jpg - 1.9MB20141028_144334.jpg - 2.1MB20141028_144245.jpg - 1.5MB20141028_144120.jpg - 2MB20141028_143933.jpg - 2.3MB20141028_143912.jpg - 1.8MB20141028_143836.jpg - 2.3MB




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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 12:41


Bottom left I believe is a gas take off adapter, bottom right is just a straight vacuum adapter for distillations instead of the normal bent one.

[Edited on 10-29-2014 by gdflp]
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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 12:43


Top left looks like part of a bubbler; the 2.3 MB in the middle right is a stopcock to be attached to a round-bottom flask with ground glass joints.



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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 12:51


Number 1 is just a tubing inlet/bubbler adapter with a ball joint, #2 is a stirrer bearing, #3 is basically the same as the first one, #4 is an air condenser (unless there are indentations at the bottom; I can't see any in the photo), #5 looks like a stopcock (with the key missing) with a ball joint, #6 is an aspirator (a vacuum pump that runs on water), #7 is just a stopcock adapter, #8 looks like a viscosimeter (or something? At least used for measuring viscosity), and #9 is just a straight vacuum adapter.

And people, keep in mind that using designations such as "in the middle" or "bottom left" is pointless, as the orientation of the pictures depends on your screen resolution.




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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 13:38


"bottom left" ?

Who's bottom ?




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[*] posted on 29-10-2014 at 14:40


I was thinking #5 was a ball jointed connecting tube only, since it doesn't seem to have any sort of special place where a stopcock would go. I'd be at a loss for what to call it other than "weirdly angled connecting tube" though. As far as #6, I didn't know they made glad aspirators, I have only Seen plastic and metal Ones. That's neat. # 5 looked like an air condenser to me but I wanted to make sure (having only worked with 14 /10 and 19/22 glassware it seemed a bit strange to me)

[Edited on 29-10-2014 by amazingchemistry]




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[*] posted on 30-10-2014 at 12:03
hopefully last batch


Here are some more

20141028_143503.jpg - 2.1MB20141028_143132.jpg - 2.3MB20141028_142751.jpg - 2.3MB20141028_142609.jpg - 2.3MB20141028_140846.jpg - 2.1MB20141028_140614.jpg - 2.2MB20141028_140033.jpg - 1.5MB20141028_141041.jpg - 2.1MB




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[*] posted on 11-1-2015 at 15:01


I also had a question on glassware, and although it's not a mystery of what it does, I am unable to find it's name, much less a supplier.

http://41.media.tumblr.com/0699e98d85973620a1ca8ee0de5f4be3/...

The piece all the way on the left with the green stopcock, some kind of addition funnel, but how can I find them, what are they called? This is one of Kristof's photo's and I've U2Ued him but he hasn't been on in a few months.




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[*] posted on 11-1-2015 at 15:14


Here you go! http://www.laboyglass.com/air-tite/tube-storage-high-vacuum-...
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[*] posted on 11-1-2015 at 18:48


30-10-2014

from top left

1) vacuum trap 2) 24/40 sealed tube to dry samples in vials
3) bent adapter (allows connecting several large items to a multineck flask) 4) trap/bubbler
5) ??? 6) three way valve with storage bulb - not sure what it is for
7) vacuum trap 8) manometer (simple vacuum guage) ( I think)
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