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Author: Subject: Mystery Glassware Identification Thread
j_sum1
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[*] posted on 5-3-2017 at 18:59


I don't understand how this works. Is it some kind of cold finger in a gas stream?
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Deathunter88
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[*] posted on 5-3-2017 at 22:43


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
I don't understand how this works. Is it some kind of cold finger in a gas stream?


The idea is you put your compound that you want to dry in the inner class chamber. Then you hook a round bottom flask and a condenser onto the outer chamber. After that you can connect a drying tube or something to the third joint leading into the middle chamber where you placed your compound. After that is all done, you choose a solvent that has a boiling point at the temperature you want to dry at. Say you have a heat sensitive compound that decomposes above 60 degrees. Then a solvent you could use would be acetone, since it has a boiling point of 56 degrees. Since the tube with your chemical is immersed in the vapor stream, it will be kept at a constant temperature (the BP of the solvent you use). Quite ingenious actually.
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j_sum1
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[*] posted on 5-3-2017 at 22:50


Quote: Originally posted by Deathunter88  
Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
I don't understand how this works. Is it some kind of cold finger in a gas stream?


The idea is you put your compound that you want to dry in the inner class chamber. Then you hook a round bottom flask and a condenser onto the outer chamber. After that you can connect a drying tube or something to the third joint leading into the middle chamber where you placed your compound. After that is all done, you choose a solvent that has a boiling point at the temperature you want to dry at. Say you have a heat sensitive compound that decomposes above 60 degrees. Then a solvent you could use would be acetone, since it has a boiling point of 56 degrees. Since the tube with your chemical is immersed in the vapor stream, it will be kept at a constant temperature (the BP of the solvent you use). Quite ingenious actually.


So you need a drying tube with a female joint to make it function properly.
Or you could use a two neck flask, condenser and a thermometer well with a glass wool plug pushed half way down and some CaCl2 on top. :D

i love these ingenious ideas people have come up with and thinking how I could achieve the same or similar result.
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Brom
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[*] posted on 9-3-2017 at 10:55


I found this in a small box labeled special cell B. Any ideas what it is designed for?

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[*] posted on 9-3-2017 at 11:03


If the wire is resistance wire, then the cell could be used in a device like a ketene generator.



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Brom
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[*] posted on 9-3-2017 at 15:09


Now that i think of it, i found some leads in the same drawer that i found the item in. Ill get them next time i go by and maybe it will help to figure out what it is for sure.
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A Halogenated Substance
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[*] posted on 24-3-2017 at 10:14


I bought a piece of glassware from an antique shop that I found interesting today. I originally had thoughts of using it in part as a drying tube or some kind distillation setup piece.

The owner said that to him, it looked like a piece of equipment used to brew moonshine (though I have no such interests).

Anyone know exactly what this is and perhaps some good lab applications for it?

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byko3y
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[*] posted on 24-3-2017 at 10:34


Looks like a burette blank to me.
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