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Author: Subject: Sand Blast Cabinet -> Glove Box Conversion
LifeisElemental
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 05:57
Sand Blast Cabinet -> Glove Box Conversion


Hello!

I apologize if this belongs in a different thread - I hope that this potentially may also benefit others if possible as used sand blasting cabinets are (I feel) more readily available then used fume hoods.

I have recently realized I have a significant need for a fume hood. Unfortunately, I have little to no technical experience with construction. I was browsing Craigslist and found the item pictured below. A homemade sand blasting cabinet.

My hope is that, despite my very limited technical knowledge I can convert this into a functional glove box. If you notice a hole is located near the top of the cabinet. Perhaps an exhaust could be placed here? I would likely also place something (an aluminum sheet?) on the bottom of the hood to cover the open hole. Could this hole be enlarged? If so, how? The box is listed as "16 gauge galvanized sheetmetal".

Any thoughts on this? Or potential exhaust blowers?





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DrAldehyde
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 07:07


I think it would make a great fume hood. The top hole could easily be trimmed to 4" to 6" with a cheap pair of tin snips. The bottom could be covered with plywood, plastic, plexiglass. Unless you are using chemicals that would require a glove box, you could use it without the gloves. Inline fans are pretty easy to find.
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Texium
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 07:41


Great find! The only thing that I'd be concerned about is that it's made of galvanized metal. Even using conc. HCl in there would easily corrode that just from the vapors, not to mention other stuff you may be dealing with in there. You should probably paint the inside with some chemical resistant epoxy. That will keep it from being attacked (and also make it look cool).

[Edited on 8-8-2014 by zts16]




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LifeisElemental
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 08:19


Thank you both for the advice! Regarding the top hole and a blower - I have found this type of blower (http://www.grainger.com/product/DAYTON-PSC-Blower-WP15386/_/...) and would like to know which one you recommend? I am worried of chemical erosion yet do not know what to look for to prevent it. If the circular end is the inlet I should leave the top hole in a circular shape correct?



Also zts16, thank you that is exactly the kind of feedback I was hoping to get! Below is something I quickly found that I believe may be used for that purpose?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/940001-Epoxy-Seal-Concrete-And-Garag...


Edit: Also this could be a possible paint? http://www.ebay.com/itm/RUST-OLEUM-5392408-Paint-White-Epoxy...

[Edited on 8-8-2014 by LifeisElemental]
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 10:05


Get a "two-part, catalyzed" product. HOPEFULLY not water based. I base this statement on having used catalyzed paints and water based versus oil based "Kilz" primer.

Quote:
From Benjamin-Moore paints webbie:

Super Spec HP Epoxy
Two component, catalyzed epoxy coatings provide excellent chemical resistance, good solvent resistance, good acid resistance, and very good abrasian resistance. By adjusting the epoxy resin, pigments, and additives they can produced as primers or finish coats with a wide variety of gloss levels. Two component epoxies cure by solvent evaporation plus chemical curing when the two components are combined.


[Edited on 8-8-2014 by arkoma]





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LifeisElemental
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 17:40


Hi all,

I purchased the cabinet for $50, if you can believe it. It is very nice and has been fun to play around with. I have measured the hole on the top to have a diameter of 3" - I'm not sure what diameter I need for a good fan. (Or for that matter, which fan.)

Also, the cabinet came with a light - the light is exposed and does get warm after some time of being left on. Is this a fire/explosion hazard I should worry about?

I will take the advice on the epoxy paint - how significant an improvement would you believe two-part products are from water based?



0808142054a.jpg - 74kB
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pepsimax
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 22:00


Great idea!

Yes I think the light is definitely something to worry about, I'm sure ether would have no reservations igniting on a hot bulb surface, to say the least.

Just in case you didn't know, two pack paints are very toxic, I wouldn't spray it without a booth and full airfed mask.
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[*] posted on 8-8-2014 at 22:04


Great idea!

Yes I think the light is definitely something to worry about, I'm sure ether would have no reservations igniting on a hot bulb surface, to say the least.

Just in case you didn't know, two pack paints are very toxic, I wouldn't spray it without a booth and full airfed mask.
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LifeisElemental
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[*] posted on 24-8-2014 at 07:59


Hi all!

I would like to post my current progress and raise some additional questions.

In an attempt to make this is as safe as possible please let me know if anything in this seems like it may corrode, be a fire hazard, etc.

I have coated the inside with a 2-part chemical-resistant epoxy paint and the outside with just regular white gloss enamel. I have cut a piece of wood to fit the bottom of the box and spray painted it with metallic enamel. (This is temporary and I will upgrade soon, hopefully.) To this piece I drilled 4 1/2" holes and created a wire frame in the box. I may add an additional horizontal rod. These rods are zinc-plated.

I have drilled a 5" hole to the top and secured the blower to the box with zinc-plated screws.

I am not sure of what to use for a light - I do not trust the one it came with as it is very hot and am possibly considering an L.E.D. - any objections to this?


0823142050.jpg - 190kB

I still have to wire the blower - knowing very little about electricity I would appreciate any aid that could be offered here. Pictured below is the blower there is a black wire, a white wire, and a green wire attached to a screw somehow.

0817141743.jpg - 222kB

I'm also stumped by the outlet of the blower as it is rectangular and I need to somehow attach this to ducting which can be thrown out the window - any suggestions here? The blower I purchased is linked below.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221484971338?_trksid=p2059210.m2749....

Now the most important issue (I feel) at the moment. Is this blower safe and what can I do to improve its safety. I would obviously prefer not to have an explosion with volatile solvents.

Thank you all!
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[*] posted on 24-8-2014 at 13:10


the blower should be housed at the end of some ducting.
the green wire attached to the metal by a screw is the Earth wire.
the other two go to live and neutral. likely black=live. should not blow up if you get those two wrong.

i assume that you intend to do seriously hazardous reactions in there.

if so, sacrifice some glass viewing window space and put the lights outside.




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[*] posted on 24-8-2014 at 14:32


Must the blower be housed at the end of ducting? I have it directly attached the box at the moment. The rectangular outlet is actually very close to the window and should only need a small amount of ducting once I figure out how to make it work.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 06:05


The farther the blower is from you, the less chance you have of being hit by shrapnel should it explode. Is the motor in the gas stream? If not, there is no explosion risk. I can't really tell from the pictures and I'm not too familar with blower types.

A benefit to having the blower at the end of the line is that it puts the ducting under negative pressure. So if the ducts develop leaks, air will be sucked in from outside instead of gases 'blowing' out (which would defeat the purpose of the hood). Also the farther away the blower is from you, the quieter it will be.

I think LED lighting is a good idea - no hot surfaces to worry about. Having the light outside the box altogether would be the safest option, really. It all depends on what you plan on working with. Methanol fumes won't do anything, but ether is a real concern.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 08:36


If the fan is electric, especially if it is a brushed motor, you risk sparks igniting whatever nasty gas you just made.

The further away from your head that happens, the better.




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