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Author: Subject: Lead Picrate
quicksilver
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[*] posted on 12-2-2012 at 07:42


My experience with picrates was interesting even though they are somewhat weak, they can be altered. That's about as dark as I have seen. Did it reflect light via crystalline planes?
I have experimented with microscope-digital cameras and been disappointed twice. I may spend some money to get a decent one because Microscopy has been a 'side-hobby" almost all my life and I still have some decent ones and (IMO) some pretty fine sample slides.




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[*] posted on 12-2-2012 at 18:20


Not in the least bit reflective in any way I assure you. Not one glint!
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[*] posted on 13-2-2012 at 08:55


Well, the only sample I worked with that had any significant energy to it was a basic lead picrate that set up as relativity tough "dark orange" polygons & the variable that MAY have made a difference was the duration of temp (in some thread I have a picture but no magnification: good color however. Most often the synthesis above is followed with a full hour at temperature but it MAY have been cutting that shorter and allowing the solution to come to room temp through an hour made a slight difference (cutting the heat at 40-50min). And realistically, it was not very energetic. I doubt that 0.5 could function as a burst for a little shell. Interestingly I have seen Pb Picrate used as a "bulking agent" in some primer compositions but could find no method to determine if it had a flame spit upon det. like Pb styphnate does.
I had considered other heavy metals such as mercury but could find no literature.

[Edited on 13-2-2012 by quicksilver]




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otonel
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[*] posted on 21-9-2014 at 08:03


I have a question: if I have tetryl (C7H5N5O8) and lead oxide can make lead picrate using that chemicals?
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Hennig Brand
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[*] posted on 24-10-2014 at 15:29


I think there are much better uses for tetryl even if it could work.

I noticed that the old military improvised lead picrate synthesis calls for nearly equal molar amounts of picric acid and lead oxide. If the reaction is taken to completion there would be one mole of lead for each mole of picric acid reacted. Basic lead picrate requires one mole of lead per mole of picric acid. Normal lead picrate requires one molecule of lead for two molecules of picric acid (from what I understand). If the product isn't basic lead picrate then what is it? Lead picrate can form several basic salts, according to Matyas.

I did the following only because I have never tried making lead picrate using lead oxide. Lead monoxide has poor solubility in water and methanol and its reaction with picric acid is slow. I tried the reaction with picric acid and lead monoxide, first in water, which even with a two hour long reaction time at boiling water temperature resulted in a partial reaction. The volume of water was kept to a minimum, a little makeup water was added from time to time during the reaction and magnetic stirring was used. I dried the solids and then added methanol and tried again. The mixture was boiled under partial reflux with magnetic stirring. A small amount of methanol escaped as vapor during the reaction. After 1.5 hours the methanol had boiled down nearly completely at which point the beaker was taken off heat and the reaction products allowed to dry almost completely. The reaction this time appeared to be basically complete, but I am unconvinced of this. The more soluble lead salts are much easier to react with picric acid.

The last 10 or 15 minutes of the reaction a darker orange color was starting to develop, but on drying the lead picrate still looks very yellow.

Lead Picrate from Lead Monoxide and Picric Acid.jpg - 339kB


[Edited on 25-10-2014 by Hennig Brand]




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[*] posted on 7-9-2015 at 11:04


Complex salts of basic lead picrate
US 3293091 A

Basic lead double salts of picric acid and method of preparing such salts
US 3262956 A

Complex crystalline picrate explosive containing entrapped amounts of lead azide
US 3431156 A

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