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Author: Subject: Ammonium Perchlorate - does it get useless or impure with age?
dangerous amateur
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[*] posted on 24-8-2014 at 12:11
Ammonium Perchlorate - does it get useless or impure with age?


Hi guys,

How does AP behave when you store it for along time?

It seems like it decomposes slowly over time, but how fast does that happen?
Is it likely that 10 or 15 year old stuff has degraded in a way that it affects rocket fuels or other compositions?

And how does it degrade just from lying around, does it decompose completely or do I get something like chloride contamination?
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Hennig Brand
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[*] posted on 24-8-2014 at 15:57


This is something that could be found easily with a little help from Google. It is used extensively in military solid rocket propellants, so that speaks volumes about its qualities. I also did a quick Google search and apparently it is very stable in pure form at ordinary temperature, but decomposes when the temperature is increased to 150C and above.



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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 00:33


No.

There is a lot of information about AP being heated, yes, but I'm looking for a decomposition rate at room temperature or something in that range.

I remember reading somewhere that AP decomposes over time, but I cant remember where it was.

[QUOTE]
Ammonium perchlorate, used in solid rocket engine fuels, has a limited shelf life and must periodically be replaced
[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE]
Within DOD, a backlog of perchlorate-based solid propellant rocket and misĀ­siles that have exceeded their perchlorate shelf life are currently in storage.
[/QUOTE]

It says PERCHLORATE shelf life, not propellant shelf life.

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VladimirLem
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 08:41


i have no experience with AP but i have too agree with Henning Brand - Military-Stuff have extremely high savety standards, if they use it (AND THEY DO} then it is definitivly save enough for amateurs like us...
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Loptr
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 09:27


Quote: Originally posted by dangerous amateur  
Hi guys,

How does AP behave when you store it for along time?

It seems like it decomposes slowly over time, but how fast does that happen?
Is it likely that 10 or 15 year old stuff has degraded in a way that it affects rocket fuels or other compositions?

And how does it degrade just from lying around, does it decompose completely or do I get something like chloride contamination?


I would think the EPA would have some nice figures of this since they track these sorts of things, especially with its use in military rockets, and the known effects of perchlorates on the thyroid gland, bone marrow, and muscles. I will see if I can pull up some figures.

I know that biodegradation is one route that is used to cleanup in waste treatment, meaning that is possible it can be attacked by micro-organisms.

[Edited on 25-8-2014 by Loptr]
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 09:59


In no way conclusive, but here is a quote from an environmental report.

http://yosemite.epa.gov/r10/CLEANUP.NSF/PH/Arkema+Technical+...

Quote:

In dilute concentrations typically found in groundwater, perchlorate behaves conservatively, with the center of mass of the plume moving at the same average velocity as the water. Dispersion results in the contaminant front actually moving faster than the average groundwater velocity. Perchlorate is kinetically very stable under environmental conditions and will not react or degrade in solution under ambient conditions. Biodegradation of perchlorate in groundwater will not occur unless significant levels of organic carbon are present, oxygen and nitrate are depleted, and perchlorate-degrading anaerobic bacteria are present.The combination of high solubility, low sorption, and lack of degradation tends to create plumes that are large, persistent, and difficult to remediate.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2014 at 14:46


Pure AP is stable as far as I can remember. Maybe the military disposes of old propellants due to phase transition issues like for AN based propellants? Slow reaction with aluminium, partial breakdown of the binder?
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