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Author: Subject: How do I store I2?
overseer
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[*] posted on 18-6-2005 at 06:24
storing iodine


The crystalline iodine is best stored in tightly closed glass containers, of very small dimensions, such as the one shown in this picture I took. The commercial resublimed iodine (if You happen to own some) is so pure that it should not be removed from original packaging, except for the amounts that You immediately need. Small quantities can, however, always be kept close at hand, in a very small, all glass, tightly closed container (picture). In this manner, although some iodine inevitably evaporates, there's little space for the vapor to fill, so You don't lose much of it. Note that iodine sublimes on the bottle neck, which entirely changed its color to brownish-yellow.

It is not advisable to mix it with water or anyhing else for storage (especially not the resublimed, purified form) as it is usually required pure and dry when measuring its quantities as a reagent.

Plastic bags are super-useless for storage, as they either let iodine through, or can react with it. I've seen a storage site where people used to put a cracked iodine bottle in a ziploc bag - a few months later, the space around the bag was all brownish-yellow and filled with little iodine crystals. So, don't try to use any plastic containers or plastic/rubber stoppers. Some people tend to think rubber makes a good stopper, but this is even less so. I've even seen a bottle of butanol, sealed with a rubber stopper, in which the rubber melted and went down the bottle walls right into the liquid. Good storage practice is generally a serious issue.

Opening a bottle of iodine so small as the one depicted here is fairly easy, even after a while. However, if the stopper won't come out usual techniques can help: hitting the bottle neck lightly against the edge of a wooden table, or gently heating the neck on a flame: the heat warms the exposed neck first, causing it to expand more than the stopper inside, which in turn can help opening the bottle. However, *do not use glycerine* or other agents which are sometimes useful on stuck glass stoppers.

[Edited on 18-6-2005 by overseer]

flask1.jpg - 6kB
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Researcher88
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[*] posted on 15-7-2005 at 00:13
storing


I store my iodine in a small jointed tube with a tight glass stopper. The iodine is then put into the freezer. To observe if any losses is present, I wrapped tissue paper around the container, waiting for few months seeing if any yellow stains appear on the tissue. I have not experienced yellow stains in a month.




[Edited on 15-7-2005 by Researcher88]
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Skitz
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smile.gif posted on 29-7-2005 at 12:26
Storing iodine


Wrap iodine bottle in tissue paper, put inside larger jar, seal & burry outside to keep cool.
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Fleaker
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[*] posted on 29-7-2005 at 18:02


This bottle is great for storing bromine or iodine. Shame they are so expensive.. A bottle like this would hold about 400 grams of iodine maybe more depending on how compressed it is. The PTFE stopper is a nice touch because bromine and iodine destroy rubber and standard issue phenolic stoppers/caps.

http://www.enasco.com/prod/ProductDetail?sku=SB28808M&ti...
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[*] posted on 30-7-2005 at 03:31


Iodine topical solution should be stored in light-resistant containers at a temperature not exceeding 35 °C and iodine tincture should be stored in air-tight containers.
Hence, i recommend that you get an air-tight container and wrapped it yourself with black paper and place it in a dry, cool area.
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MagicJigPipe
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[*] posted on 19-10-2007 at 18:46


Glass vial, glass or teflon stopper + as cold as you can keep it. I have found that to be the best way. I have noticed only minimal sublimation no more than a few milimeters from the I2 sample. Although my freezer goes down to -30*C.

I'm trying to obtain a dry ice freezer. That would be perfect! In theory I could store I2 and solid Br2 with minimal sublimation/evaporation. Although the solid Br2 might be difficult to store as solid... Something to think about though...

One could even store small amounts of liquid NH3 for short periods of time (you won't see me doing this, however). I'm going to ask around the local grocery stores to see if anyone is getting rid of one.
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