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Author: Subject: Tour My Lab
MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 13-7-2018 at 05:25


Hospital bills are more expensive!
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AlexC
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[*] posted on 13-7-2018 at 06:50


And it's not always about money, but about safety. Safety should be our first concern in chemistry. Everything else is less important. Hospital bills are more expensive if they can help you, if they can't, you know what.
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 13-7-2018 at 07:50


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  


It always seems to me that workable bench space and storage space are always the most difficult things to organise. No matter how much you have you always feel like you could use some more.


I have very little bench space outside of my fume hood. I certainly wish I had more but my garage is only so big. I put everything away as soon as possible during an experiment.

What I want to do is insulate my lab ceiling and walls so I can use it in the really cold days and the hot days, like right now. My attic is full of stuff so this makes it tough to insulate. One wall is a pull up door (double), but I haven't put a car in my garage in 20 years. My wife owns most of our garage.

[Edited on 13-7-2018 by Magpie]




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[*] posted on 13-7-2018 at 09:44


Quote: Originally posted by LaBoom  
Quote: Originally posted by MrHomeScientist  
Well once you get the fume hood running, theoretically you won't need to worry about being near a flame source.



tyvm. I was considering putting dual ventilation fans powered separately on the fume hood exactly for that purpose. both would have to be equal in cfm, and strong enough to serve the necessary cu ft individually. it would be easy to put in a "Y" joiner before they reached the outside exhaust port.


The other failure mode I've considered is a splashed liquid on a heating mantle or hot plate tripping a circuit breaker and knocking out power to the lab - fans and lights included.

I'm not at the stage of being able to outfit a lab but I would definitely consider a UPS for any safety critical equipment.
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MJ101
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[*] posted on 14-7-2018 at 05:32


@streety: Uninterupted power is a good idea. Of course, you'd have to use a UPS that doesn't contribute anything to the working environment (Lead-Acid batteries generate hydrogen while charging, IIRC) Plus the UPS would have to be in a place where none of the reagents can corrode it.

How long do you want the UPS to supply power to the lab? That would be determined by the load your equipment is placing on the UPS.
You'd have to figure that out.

I don't see myself setting up a full lab any time soon (I live in a studio in North Brooklyn, NYC) Too much risk for the people around me.
For now, I'm quite happy learning about safety, and how the basic reactions work.

But I can show pics of my electronics lab if anybody is interested. :)

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Abromination
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[*] posted on 16-7-2018 at 16:34


Well I recently built a fume hood for my lab and it has worked great. It's not ideal for a lot of things but for smoke, odors steams and less dangerous fumes it's perfect. I have seperate shelves for chemicals and equipment and keep salts with acids, acids and bases seperate, and organica away from eachother and everything else. I have no running water but have a jug of distilled water on top of my shelves.

Here is the design for the fumehood:
https://www.instructables.com/id/Fume-Hood-for-Under-30/


IMG_2962.JPG - 1.2MBIMG_2961.JPG - 1.3MBIMG_2960.JPG - 1.3MB




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Sulaiman
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[*] posted on 22-8-2018 at 00:32
Not much chemistry lately but upgraded facilities


Due to home renovations my Al fresco laboratory extension now has more stuff


Alfresco_Lab_right.jpg - 1.2MB

Left-to-right;
A plastic mini-greenhouse, (bought on offer for £20)
Toaster-oven on Microwave oven on Refrigerator (£new items for kitchen)
Dual (1500W & 500W) hotplate (£15 via eBay)
Old pressure cooker (testing with water before actual runs with kerosene)
Hosepipe for water supply
Hosepipe to drain
Workbench with heat exchanger (ex-central heating radiator)

Alfresco_Lab_left.jpg - 1.6MB
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 24-8-2018 at 18:09


Here's a picture of the AC my son and I installed in the wall of my lab. It is good for 350ft^2 floor space and removes 10,000 BTU/hr. This winter I will insulate the roof of the lab. Toggle picture to turn it.





AC for lab.JPG - 1.9MB

[Edited on 25-8-2018 by Magpie]




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[*] posted on 15-9-2018 at 05:09


my cluttered room..boxes of flash columns. six hplc pumps, three detectors, flash, and FTIR

C7B3B158-B8D2-4ADC-B0FD-0C84E51820CB.jpeg - 903kB
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[*] posted on 19-9-2018 at 04:42


Here's a few photos of my basement lab. The hood closes on a piano hinge, in the photo the window is up. I have running water in the form of a hose, but no sink. I drain into buckets. The condenser is cooled from a reservoir under the bench.

The chemistry set on the top shelf in one of the photos is very similar to the one that started me in this hobby. I found it, unopened, at a tag sale. Thirty bucks for the coolest walk into the past I've had in years!




lab_1.jpg - 172kBlab_2.jpg - 117kB
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zenosxr
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[*] posted on 23-9-2018 at 17:13


Impressive JScott!
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[*] posted on 27-9-2018 at 06:31


Thank you,

After seeing other lab postings this is a humble offering to be sure. A good deal that needs to be improved.

Here's a photo of the electronics bench on the other side of the basement. There's also a computer lab across the room. A network of 6 PCs acting as various servers, and experimental goof off boxes. Mac, Windows, Linux.

We also do HAM radio and my wife is a amateur naturalist. There's an area for lapidary and some dissection as well.



elecBench.jpg - 132kB

[Edited on 9-27-2018 by JScott]

[Edited on 9-27-2018 by JScott]
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[*] posted on 5-10-2018 at 11:39


https://vimeo.com/293620635
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[*] posted on 18-10-2018 at 11:02


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
Here's 3 pictures of my homemade fume hood. These have been resized to a maximum dimension of 550 pixels so hopefully Taaie can put away his Dramamine. (Thanks Taaie for the software guidance ;)).

The hood dimensions are 41.5" H x 48"W x 28" D. (1" = 2.54cm). It is made from 14 gauge aluminum (1/16"). Inside is epoxy coated, except for the removable baffles (2 ea). There is a removable stainless steel pan with 1" high sides.

The blower is 120VAC, 1/4HP, 1000 rpm, squirrel cage, open one-end estimated to move 400-500 ft3/min. The ducting is 8" IPS 63 psi irrigation :D PVC with schedule 40 fittings.

The outlet plenum is 16 gauge stainless steel. Both sheet metal pieces were fabricated by local shops to my drawings.

[Edited on 13-11-2005 by Magpie]

The 4' x 7" fluorescent light rests on a tempered glass piece silicone caulked to the aluminum frame.

[Edited on 13-11-2005 by Magpie]


Sorry to dig up this old post but I will need to operate the fume hood I built some years ago according to the dimensions you posted, right now it's a plywood box and baffles coated with 2-3 coats of epoxy, the only thing that is missing is the sliding window. According to what you posted the dimensions are as follows

box face dimensions
4' x 5' = 122 x 152 cm

window dimensions
48" x 41.5"= 122 x 105 cm

so there is a 47 cm bypass at the top or am I mistaken somewhere? Thanks.




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 18-10-2018 at 13:35


Yes, you are correct. The bypass opening is necessary to provide a path for airflow. If you were to completely close off the opening the noxious vapors would just sit there.



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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 08:28


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
Yes, you are correct. The bypass opening is necessary to provide a path for airflow. If you were to completely close off the opening the noxious vapors would just sit there.


Yes I understand that, I am wondering if 47cm is a bit excessive as a bypass, I've used fume hoods in my uni lab and the bypass from what I remember must have been not more than 30 cm and there was a grill in front. Is 47 cm the bypass you've used for your fume hood magpie? Thanks.




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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 09:23


My bypass is 24". Most of the hood face is taken up by the sliding window.



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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 11:56


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
My bypass is 24". Most of the hood face is taken up by the sliding window.


That's 60 cm of open space, so you have an area of 122 x 60 cm as open space(I mean the bypass) when the sliding window is closed, is that right? Have you put any grills in front? I haven't found any photos with the whole front face of your fume hood. I can literally fit myself through this bypass. :D The commercial fume hoods have an extra box in front of the window at the top where the bypass is,

I've noticed that in one of your photos you show a plenum behind the sliding window at the top, is the fume hood you built a box or does it have another shape? Thanks.




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 21-10-2018 at 13:12


It's a box with a baffle offset 2" from the back wall. The baffle then comes out at an angle at the top to allow airflow out the duct. This picture is the best I have. Scroll down to see the frontal picture.

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=47...

The inner frame has no glass. The outer sliding glass can slide up and down as required. In the picture there is a bypass in the bottom but also in the top that can not be seen here. The total of the two bypasses is 24".

[Edited on 21-10-2018 by Magpie]




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[*] posted on 22-10-2018 at 10:19


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
It's a box with a baffle offset 2" from the back wall. The baffle then comes out at an angle at the top to allow airflow out the duct. This picture is the best I have. Scroll down to see the frontal picture.

https://www.sciencemadness.org/whisper/viewthread.php?tid=47...

The inner frame has no glass. The outer sliding glass can slide up and down as required. In the picture there is a bypass in the bottom but also in the top that can not be seen here. The total of the two bypasses is 24".

[Edited on 21-10-2018 by Magpie]


It's this that I don't understand, if the total height is 48" or 41.5" what is the height of X and Y in this picture?
I think I mixed up the height and width.
Can you also tell me what is the bypass at the top and the bottom separately?

hood side view - resized2.bmp - 664kB

Does the box section of the fume hood have: height 105.4 cm = 41.5" and the width 122 cm = 48" and the window 48" width and 59" height? Thanks.

[Edited on 22-10-2018 by gatosgr]




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[*] posted on 22-10-2018 at 15:14




hood dimensions.JPG - 2.3MB




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[*] posted on 23-10-2018 at 12:58


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  




Thanks a lot, can you also tell me what is the dimensions of Z in the picture?

Is these a specific reason for the fume hood to have this shape since I will cut it to fit the exact dimensions you provided, it's some hours of work but I will certainly do it if it improves the airflow, thanks.

hood side view - resized3.bmp - 492kB




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[*] posted on 23-10-2018 at 14:36


First I bought a standard window (except it has only one pane). Then I had the hood made of aluminum. The triangular shape is necessary for the mating of the two pieces. You might ask why I just didn't make the hood bigger to accommodate the window. The answer is: space limitations.

It is a right triangle with short legs of 5.5" and 9.5".




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[*] posted on 24-10-2018 at 22:12


Thanks for the info. The total bypass is 24" but how much bypass do you leave at the bottom and how much at the top? I think I'll make a smaller window to avoid making the triangle do you think I should also make smaller bypass?



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[*] posted on 25-10-2018 at 07:08


There is a sliding window that can slide all the way to the top or all the way to the bottom. So the 2 gaps can be set anyway you want. They total 24" and the bypass area remains constant.



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