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Author: Subject: What do I do with this now?
ChemGrl5
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[*] posted on 23-11-2005 at 17:12
What do I do with this now?


O.K
About a week ago I decided to produce a small sample of nitric acid just for fun. Using pharmacutical grade KNO3, a beautiful very pale yellow, almost clear 3- 4 ml. sample was produced. However my storage methods were not very well thought out. I took a cork which I wraped tightly with electrical tape "for a more snug fit", stuck it in the test tube firmly and then used more electrical tape to tightly hold the cork in place. The sample was then stored in a small section of 3/4" PVC with two end caps to protect it from the light, air ect. Now of course the sample has leaked through the "seal" and although the sample is still clear it has turned a pale green.
So question # 1 Have I inadvertently nitrated the cork into some sort of "high energy" material I should be worried about?
question # 2 What turned it green, Is there now something in the acid I should be worried about or is it now some other unstable compound?
question # 3 Now that I have had my fun, how may I safely and gently neutralize the sample?

Thanks Chemgrl5




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neutrino
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[*] posted on 23-11-2005 at 17:30


Nitrations do not usually proceed this way. You shouldn't have anything to worry about.

The green color is probably from trace metals in the glass or NOx impurities. Again, nothing to worry about.

To neutralize, just pour into baking soda.

[Edited on 24-11-2005 by neutrino]
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ChemGrl5
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biggrin.gif posted on 23-11-2005 at 17:42


Well if the acid is still "safe" then I will probably "fry" a couple of copper pennies with it. Hey will nitric acid harm my antique white pyrex dish?:)



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[*] posted on 23-11-2005 at 17:51


I believe Nitric acid reacts w/ copper to form various Nitrogen oxides. You will probably want some good air circulation.

As for the pyrex dish I don't know. Chances are it will be ok
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[*] posted on 23-11-2005 at 19:16


Of course it will be okay. Any ordinary glass but soda-lime will stand up to nitric acid with no problem.
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