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Author: Subject: good rubber solvent
stricnine
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thumbup.gif posted on 21-12-2005 at 07:23
good rubber solvent


Hi there!

Anyone can tell of good rubber solvent/solvents? (Just in case there is misunderstanding, I'm referring to the actual material (vulcanised cautchouc), not condoms!).

Found out that formaldehyde works, and I remember trementine could damage rubber seriously. Pentane/hexane/heptane are also on my list.

Cheers

Stricnine
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[*] posted on 21-12-2005 at 07:32


Try N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), butyrolactone.
Havent tested it, but NMP dissolves PVC flooring, so it might do the job with rubber, too.




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[*] posted on 21-12-2005 at 09:17


Chloroform is also a good solvent for rubber as I found out accidentally.
If chloroform is not available, dichloromethane could be used as a substitute, the solvent properties of the two are roughly the same.
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[*] posted on 21-12-2005 at 14:46


What exactly are you trying to do here? Are you after a solution of rubber in some solvent or are you just trying to get rid of some pesky rubber in an annoying place? If you want the latter, nitric acid might be worth a try.
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stricnine
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 03:48


Yeah, acqua regia is my favourite, but I want to partially dissolve rubber to more or less get a solution of it - but agaion not dissolve it completely
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 08:48


There are hundreds of different kinds of rubber from natural rubber to Kalrez (perfluoroelastomer). The kind of rubber will highly influence the selection of solvent. Please be more specific.



Knowing that I can buy good quality NaOH, HCl, and H2SO4 locally gives me great peace of mind.
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stricnine
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 10:20


It is simple rubber: 'ol natural vulcanised latex or SBR = car tyres broken down into chips. There ain´t no fluorine as far as I know. That's why I mentioned at the beginning "vulcanised caoutchouc".
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 11:53


I missed your reference to cautchouc. I guess I am just too used to questions being asked in English on this forum.

My reference says that "oil, gasoline, kerosene, benzene, toluene, halogenated solvents, and diester lubes" will all attack SBR. I don't know which would be a good solvent, however.




Knowing that I can buy good quality NaOH, HCl, and H2SO4 locally gives me great peace of mind.
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 13:26


Maybe phosphorous oxychloride will work...
If I remember right, it was used in war first of using blistering agents (or similar) to damage the rubber of gas masks
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[*] posted on 22-12-2005 at 22:35


I personally wouldn’t use POCl3 as it is fairly hard to come by, and it’s defiantly not an armature chemist friendly compound. Plus a quick google search didn’t yield anything about it being able to dissolve rubber although I may be wrong about that.



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stricnine
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[*] posted on 27-12-2005 at 18:05


I will be trying with Thioglycolate - permanent hair waving disulphide bond braeaker.

I will report on the results.

Keep on supporting!!

Stricnine




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[*] posted on 16-7-2010 at 23:21


US patent 4465535

Adhering Cured polymers or Prepolymers
To High Natural Rubber Elastomer

Reports that 1,2-Dichloroethane preps the surface well.

.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2010 at 05:04


I've recently learned the hard way, that toluene over 24h does indeed make suba-seal septa swell and soften into sticky messes.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2010 at 05:15


Quote: Originally posted by aonomus  
I've recently learned the hard way, that toluene over 24h does indeed make suba-seal septa swell and soften into sticky messes.



----
Stamp collectors use toluene to remove glue.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2010 at 05:15


Halocarbon solvents like CCl4, CHCl3, CH2Cl2, CH3CCl3, etc., should do the job, although they are mostly more expen$ive and may be liver toxins, and have largely gone out of favor for damaging the ozone layer when their vapors are released to the atmosphere.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2010 at 08:07


Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) is used as a dry cleaning solvent. How hard is that to get OTC, ie. not from a chemical company? Butyl acetate is used as a solvent for rubber cement.
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[*] posted on 17-7-2010 at 10:34


Nonflammable paint strippers can be distilled to get CH2Cl2. They're only around $20 a gallon too.
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[*] posted on 10-6-2011 at 16:10


Quote: Originally posted by Vogelzang  
Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) is used as a dry cleaning solvent. How hard is that to get OTC, ie. not from a chemical company?


Tetrachloroethylene is sold as a grease-remover in electronics. I bought a can of it today in Home Depot for 8 dollars.




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[*] posted on 11-6-2011 at 01:18


is there a way to extract elemental sulfur from rubber?
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[*] posted on 11-6-2011 at 08:27


Quote: Originally posted by Random  
is there a way to extract elemental sulfur from rubber?


Why would you want to do that? :o




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[*] posted on 11-6-2011 at 15:14


Try a search on that poopular search engine using " rubber cement thinner " and see if will give you what you need. It might be best.
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[*] posted on 13-6-2011 at 00:17


Quote: Originally posted by redox  
Quote: Originally posted by Random  
is there a way to extract elemental sulfur from rubber?


Why would you want to do that? :o


I have rubber, but I odn't have enough sulfur.
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[*] posted on 16-6-2011 at 13:02


It is not possible to extract sulfur from vulcanized rubber, as it is crosslinked chemically to the rubber polymer chains. You can buiy sulfur cheap at most drugstores or agrocultural supply stores, as it kills fungus well, and is used as "snake repellent".

Toluene is a common solvent for rubber cement, which is a solution of rubber in solvent. Mixtures of Toluene, Xylene, hexanes, and such are all used. If you want to be able to remove the solvent, like for a glue, that is a good solution. Chloronated solvents also work well, but are very volatile and more hazardous.

NMP and other high boiling solvents will slowly dissolve rubber and many other materials, but the resultant goo is hard to do anything further with.
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[*] posted on 20-6-2011 at 18:28


Quote: Originally posted by Dr.Bob  
It is not possible to extract sulfur from vulcanized rubber..........


Care to rephrase that? lol




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[*] posted on 21-6-2011 at 04:22


I read somewhere that gasoline can be used to make rubber cement, but it was used with "natural rubber". I'm not sure it would dissolve vulcanized rubber as well or at all.
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