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Author: Subject: Capsaicin extraction and isolation
ramarao
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[*] posted on 9-9-2006 at 08:15


yOU TRY DRINKING VERY THIN BUTTER MILK ATLEST 300 ML TO DE-HOTIFY OR TO DE-ACTIVATE ITS BURNING SENSATION EFFECT BOTH IN THE MOUTH AND STOMACH.
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[*] posted on 10-9-2006 at 01:55


that`s why most hot curries etc... are served with Riata (a Mint in Yogurt based dip).
sweet things are suposed to help with the mouth side of things too, the indian drink Lassi is a sweet yogurt and fruit based drink and also very good for this, not too disimilar to a Milkshake.




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chemoleo
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[*] posted on 17-9-2006 at 19:03


Please have a look at this thread:
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=5329
See my post on 14-2-2006 at 01:59

Your speculations on the function of 'capsaicin receptors' are simply wrong.
Darn. I am going to merge this. There's no reason this should be a seperate thread.




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roamingnome
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[*] posted on 3-10-2006 at 13:48


thanks for these interesting extractions

trying to work with dry habanerios

want to mill it to a fine powder and compress it into a
non-lethal .357 round, maybye some rock salt too

of course i dont know how to test how effective it will be...
maybe ill send it to the jackass crew... hehehe
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[*] posted on 6-8-2007 at 22:59


I think this counts as some sort of 'synthesis' of capsaicin:D:D

hotazel.JPG - 56kB




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JohnWW
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[*] posted on 7-8-2007 at 01:19


I eat large quantities of chilis and products made from them, especially in winter, including the type shown above.
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12AX7
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[*] posted on 7-8-2007 at 13:35


Some nice red ones there!



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[*] posted on 7-8-2007 at 14:10


Red Savina?

I've tried growing some plants as well but this summer sucked, it just wasn't hot enough. :S




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The_Davster
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[*] posted on 7-8-2007 at 16:58


Hotazel actually. A hybrid for oil extraction, or so says the site I bought the seeds from. Same hotness, thinner flesh supposedly.

My red savina plant is a slower grower, it just started flowering recently and I only have 5 or so peppers on it, all of which are green.

Last summer they failed because I planted the seeds in june or something, this year I planted in january, giving them a long enough growing season.




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Ozone
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[*] posted on 7-8-2007 at 18:09


hot az 'el. Yep.

Great looking plant!


Love from Cajunland,

O3




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Nerro
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[*] posted on 8-8-2007 at 02:22


Any tips for growing them? Do you grow them inside the hosue or outside? How hot are your summers?



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The_Davster
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[*] posted on 8-8-2007 at 16:06


I have a few, some are more what I did that seemed to work, and no control to compare them to.

-Planted in january-not sure if that is necessary in warmer climates, but with a 3-4 month growing season where I am, it was necessary
-Watering the seedlings with diluted 20-20-20 exclusivly makes them have very nice leaves
-Transplant seedlings before they get root bound, I had 2 other red savina seedlings which were transplanted at the same time as the others, and they were root bound at the time and died shortly after.
-After transplanting I watered using 20-20-20 diluted only on the weekends, otherwise they were not flowering
-dont plant in huge pots after transplanting(may be specific to here) so that they do become root bound, and they think they are going to die so they attempt to reproduce by flowering and making peppers, last year I used big pots, and I only ever got flowers, never any peppers, despite the plants being about 4x the size of the one in the picture.

They were kept in pots indoors, last year I don't think they liked the cold and aphids outside. This year they seem to love my hot south facing windowsill. My summer (outside) temperatures range from the high 'teens' to low twenties usually, but there are always a few weeks where the temp goes into the low thirties/high twenties. My windowsil is above 26 most of the time(max temp on one of those floating ball density thermometers).

I roughly followed what was on this site:
htt p://www.fiery-foods.com/dave/containers.asp




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Lambda
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[*] posted on 23-8-2007 at 12:46


Due to the interest that this thread has recieved in respect to viewings, I have managed to Secure a Good Book on the subject of Capsicum:



Posted by @Lambda on 23-8-2007 at 18:22 (Password Protected, please Login first !):
https://sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=7208&...

Enjoy !

Lambda.
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[*] posted on 25-8-2007 at 07:06


Quote:
Originally posted by The_Davster
I think this counts as some sort of 'synthesis' of capsaicin:D:D


I've got the same kind of chilies, but I wasn't aware
they were habanero.
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[*] posted on 27-1-2008 at 11:38


Quote:
Originally posted by Lambda
Due to the interest that this thread has recieved in respect to viewings, I have managed to Secure a Good Book on the subject of Capsicum:



Posted by @Lambda on 23-8-2007 at 18:22 (Password Protected, please Login first !):
https://sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=7208&...

Enjoy !

Lambda.
I'm very interested about capsaicin, but your link it's password-protected.
How can I read it?
NeroCupo
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sparkgap
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[*] posted on 28-1-2008 at 07:03


Without giving you the password, here is what Lambda was referring to:

http://rapidshare.com/files/41765965/De0415299918.rar

Enjoy.

sparky (~_~)




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StevenRS
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[*] posted on 1-2-2008 at 19:38


I have read that capsaicin is actually not very toxic, just painful

"If humans are about as sensitive as mice, the acute fatal toxicity dose for a 150 pound person would be about thirteen grams of pure, crystalline capsaicinoids, which frankly, sounds high to us. I think that less than that would be lethal."

Source: http://www.fiery-foods.com/dave/capsaicin.asp
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[*] posted on 3-2-2008 at 03:37


Quote:
Originally posted by sparkgap
Without giving you the password, here is what Lambda was referring to:

http://rapidshare.com/files/41765965/De0415299918.rar

Enjoy.

sparky (~_~)
Thank you very much, it's very interesting :)
NeroCupo
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loveoforganic
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[*] posted on 9-1-2010 at 02:09


Tried an extraction with ~4 tablespoons cayenne pepper freshly ground in a coffee grinder, extracted with ~150 mL acetone. Bright red liquid was decanted and filtered, leaving a grey solid that had a slight red present as well. Evaporated as well as possible, leaving ~15 mL solution (acetone smell still present). Attempted to triturate with water. Two layers formed (all liquid). Aqueous layer was faintly red and was on bottom. On top of aqueous layer was a deep, deep red oil (color of oxidized blood). Water was pipetted off, then oil was decanted (~1 mL collected). Acetone smell no longer present (extracted into aqueous layer). Smells faintly of the red pepper. Viscosity similar to motor oil, possibly a little thicker. Prior to attempted trituration, a tiny amount (probably ~10 mg) of a white solid would settle on bottom of solution upon extensive sitting. Unsure yet if this will occur with decanted oil. No real burning smell from any of the solutions though. I suppose the vapor pressure of all the capsaicinoids is very low?

Anyone else have any luck?
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[*] posted on 14-1-2010 at 23:43


The levels of capsaicinoids present in cayenne are very low. If you're attempting an extraction, it's far better to start with bhut jolokia, red savina habenaros, or other extremely hot pepper. The main problem here is that all peppers are going to yield a mixture of capsaicinoids that you won't be able to seperate without something as powerful as preparative HPLC. That is of course, after you strip out the carotenoids, plant waxes, and oils.

Alternatively, total synthesis is an option. Placement of the trans double bond with amateur friendly reagents is a problem that has consistently befuddled me. A number of reactions exist to generate trans double bonds, but they all involve air-sensitives, potent mutagens, or reagents that are just difficult to come by.

[Edited on 1-15-10 by UnintentionalChaos]




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[*] posted on 23-3-2010 at 11:53
noted in passing...


http://tinyurl.com/yf59tck

Indian military to weaponize world's hottest chili

Mar 23, 6:19 AM (ET)

By WASBIR HUSSAIN
GAUHATI, India (AP) - The Indian military has a new weapon against terrorism: the world's hottest chili.
After conducting tests, the military has decided to use the thumb-sized "bhut jolokia," or "ghost chili," to make tear gas-like hand grenades to immobilize suspects, defense officials said Tuesday.
The bhut jolokia was accepted by Guinness World Records in 2007 as the world's spiciest chili. It is grown and eaten in India's northeast for its taste, as a cure for stomach troubles and a way to fight the crippling summer heat.
It has more than 1,000,000 Scoville units, the scientific measurement of a chili's spiciness. Classic Tabasco sauce ranges from 2,500 to 5,000 Scoville units, while jalapeno peppers measure anywhere from 2,500 to 8,000.
"The chili grenade has been found fit for use after trials in Indian defense laboratories, a fact confirmed by scientists at the Defense Research and Development Organization," Col. R. Kalia, a defense spokesman in the northeastern state of Assam, told The Associated Press.
"This is definitely going to be an effective nontoxic weapon because its pungent smell can choke terrorists and force them out of their hide-outs," R. B. Srivastava, the director of the Life Sciences Department at the New Delhi headquarters of the DRDO said.
Srivastava, who led a defense research laboratory in Assam, said trials are also on to produce bhut jolokia-based aerosol sprays to be used by women against attackers and for the police to control and disperse mobs.
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[*] posted on 23-3-2010 at 12:47


Non lethal capsaicin based tear gas grenades-been done for a while
Capsaicin based self-defense products for women and men -been done for a while...

Not sure why the writers found it newsworthy, other than the fact it uses the world's hottest chilies.




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[*] posted on 24-3-2010 at 06:50


That is impressively spicy. Capsaicin is 16M scoville, so those are approximately 6% of pure pain!

Tim




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[*] posted on 24-3-2010 at 17:52


I do like the concept of 'weapons grade peppers' though.
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[*] posted on 24-3-2010 at 17:57


I believe I read that despite the excruciating pain capsaicin causes it is almost completely non-toxic, it directly targets pain receptors and doesn't cause cell damage.



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