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Author: Subject: Processing chlorate cell electrolyte
Saerynide
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[*] posted on 22-3-2004 at 06:26


Im curious. If Cl2 and H2 explode when exposed to UV light, then would a chlorate cell explode if it was made of glass or anyother UV penetratable material?
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t_Pyro
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[*] posted on 25-3-2004 at 10:17


Unless the cell is absolutely air-tight, there shouldn't be any problem. Hydrogen, being the lightest gas, diffuses through even the smallest of openings pretty fast. Whatever small quantity of hydrogen gas that does combine with chlorine will immediately get dissolved in the water again. Also, glass is not transparent to UV light.
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Saerynide
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[*] posted on 25-3-2004 at 11:08


Glass is not transparent to UV light?? :o Then why do glasses need anti-UVray coatings and how did I get sun-burned through the window on a 6 hour bus ride? :o
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t_Pyro
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[*] posted on 26-3-2004 at 02:50


No, glass is not enitrely transparent to UV light.
Regarding sunburns, you might be wondering <a href="http://physics.about.com/cs/light/a/010803.htm"> "Can you get Sunburned Thorugh Glass?"</a> That should answer all your questions.

[Edited on 26-3-2004 by t_Pyro]
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needle
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[*] posted on 3-6-2004 at 08:18


Many writes of the dichromate-addition in the cell to raise efficiancy. But what does it do? I've both read that it prevents the reduction of ClO3 to ClO, and that it itself it reduced to Cr(III) as a protecting layer around the cathode. Is this true?

Could one add another, less dangerous, chemical with the same effect? Perhaps KMnO4?

Thanks.
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evilgecko
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[*] posted on 6-1-2005 at 19:32


I know this is an old topic but I have got one hell of an annoying chlorate cell in my shed :(. It firstly consisted on two 100mm long (immersed) carbon rods of 8mm diametre about 15mm apart in a concentrated salt solution. The current was only 0.8A so I added 7 more electrodes, forming a circle, each one 15mm away from the two nearest. Each one has two of the opposing charge beside it eg cathode-anode-cathode all the way around the circle. The current with this setup was 3A but after 5mins dropped back down to around 0.8A. I could have 7A going through this withough succseding the current density of 43mA/cm2. Any suggestions to why the current is so low and how to increase the current?
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hodges
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[*] posted on 7-1-2005 at 17:42


I'm not sure why this would reduce the current but the approach you are using for series cells is not likely to work very well. There should only be two electrodes in each cell; connect cells in separate containers in series to run multiple cells at once. Otherwise the electrodes being in the same cell are going to short each other out.

Also, two carbon rods is not ideal for a cell. You want a carbon rod for the anode, but for the cathode you want a large piece of metal arranged so that the chlorine bubbles from the anode rise and mix with the solution next to the cathode. Otherwise the chlorine will escape and you will end up making sodium hydroxide.
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evilgecko
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[*] posted on 7-1-2005 at 19:24


Well I found the problem with the current, it was to do with the connections between the power supply and the electrodes. I had used clothes pegs with aluminium foil wrapped around them and the wire inside. They just gripped onto the electrode. I discovered this when I though that the problem was the voltage, and increased it to 12V. As you would expect these got very hot and they started melting. So I made some connections similar to the ones for 12V car batteries out of a cat food tin. With these suddenly my current jumped to 7A. I lowered the voltage back down to 5V and now it is working at 4A with 700mL of electrolyite. I heard somewhere that optimum is 2A per 100mL. Anway I'm designing my 5th cell at the moment, using a carbon rod and a stainless steel spoon. If I drill a 12mm hole on the spoon, then I can bend it so that the carbon rod goes through the middle of it, so rising chlorine will hit the spoon and get trapped by its conical shape for a bit. Is this a good idea? Also the cell will be taller and thinner, so that there is only 500mL electrolyte.
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evilgecko
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[*] posted on 9-1-2005 at 01:01


One question, can you use 10A 240V fuses on 5V and still have it blow at 10A? Or is it on power, so that i would need 0.2A 240V fuse to blow when 5V reaches 10A. Or is it something compeltely different which means I'll have to find a 5V fuse. I would of done a practicle to find this out but then I realised all my fuse wire had gone into making electrical ignitors.
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hodges
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[*] posted on 9-1-2005 at 14:13


10A 240V fuse will blow just as well at 5V as at 240V. It will blow at its rated amperage. You can use a fuse at a lower voltage than its rating, but not at a higher voltage (since a higher voltage might arc across the gap left when the fuse blows).
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[*] posted on 9-1-2005 at 15:26


Thanks, hodges. Now I can leave my chlorate cell on all night.
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